• The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present low resolution Spitzer spectra covering 5-38um and provide a basic analysis of the mid-IR spectral properties for nearby LIRGs. In a companion paper, we discuss detailed fits to the spectra. The GOALS sample of 244 nuclei in 180 luminous and 22 ultraluminous IR galaxies represents a complete subset of the IRAS RBGS and covers a range of merger stages, morphologies and spectral types. The majority (>60%) of GOALS LIRGs have high 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EQW > 0.4um) and low levels of silicate absorption (s_9.7um >-1.0). There is a general trend among the U/LIRGs for silicate depth and MIR slope to increase with LIR. U/LIRGs in the late stages of a merger also have on average steeper MIR slopes and higher levels of dust obscuration. Together these trends suggest that as gas & dust is funneled towards the center of a coalescing merger, the nuclei become more compact and obscured. The sources that depart from these correlations have very low PAH EQW (EQW < 0.1um) consistent with their MIR emission being dominated by an AGN. The most heavily dust obscured sources are the most compact in their MIR emission, suggesting that the obscuring (cool) dust is associated with the outer regions of the starburst. As the merger progresses a marked decline is seen for the fraction of high EQW (star formation dominated) sources while the fraction of composite sources increases but the fraction of AGN-dominated sources remains low. When compared to the MIR spectra of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z~2, the average GOALS LIRG is more absorbed at 9.7um and has more PAH emission. However, when the AGN contributions to both the local LIRGs and the high-z SMGs are removed, the average local starbursting LIRG closely resembles the starbursting SMGs.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • We present 21 cm HI line observations of 5x1 square degrees centered on the local Abell cluster 1367 obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. One hundred sources are detected (79 new HI measurements and 50 new redshifts), more than half belonging to the cluster core and its infalling region. Combining the HI data with SDSS optical imaging we show that our HI selected sample follows scaling relations similar to the ones usually observed in optically selected samples. Interestingly all galaxies in our sample appear to have nearly the same baryon fraction independently of their size, surface brightness and luminosity. The most striking difference between HI and optically selected samples resides in their large scale distribution: whereas optical and X-ray observations trace the cluster core very well, in HI there is almost no evidence of the presence of the cluster. Some implications on the determination of the cluster luminosity function and HI distribution for samples selected at different wavelength are also discussed.
  • We present B, R, and Halpha imaging data of 19 large disk galaxies whose properties are intermediate between classical low surface brightness galaxies and ordinary high surface brightness galaxies. We use data taken from the Lowell 1.8m Perkins telescope to determine the galaxies' overall morphology, color, and star formation properties. Morphologically, the galaxies range from Sb through Irr and include galaxies with and without nuclear bars. The colors of the galaxies vary from B-R = 0.3 - 1.9, and most show at least a slight bluing of the colors with increasing radius. The Halpha images of these galaxies show an average star formation rate lower than is found for similar samples with higher surface brightness disks. Additionally, the galaxies studied have both higher gas mass-to-luminosity and diffuse Halpha emission than is found in higher surface brightness samples.
  • Using both the Arecibo 305m and the Nancay decimetric 100-m class radio telescopes, we have observed the HI line of 116 Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies from the Bothun et al. 1985 subset of LSB galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalog. The observations had a detection rate of 70%, resulting in the new determination of HI properties for 81 galaxies. Surprisingly, roughly half of the detected objects (38) have M_HI >= 10^10 M_sol, placing them into the category of massive LSB galaxies. As previously only ~18 of these `Malin 1 cousins' were known, our results have more than tripled the number of these fascinating and enigmatic systems known. Combining our results with previous studies done on the Bothun et al. catalog results in a well-defined catalog of HI properties of 526 LSB galaxies ranging in redshift space from 0 <= z <= 0.1. With this catalog in hand, we have been able to explore the parameter space occupied by LSB galaxies more completely than has been previously possible. In agreement with previous studies, our results show LSB galaxies with some of the most extreme properties of disk galaxies, including M_HI/L_B ratios often exceeding 10 M_sol/L_sol,B.
  • [annotated] HST WFPC2 images were taken of three LSB dwarf elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The intent of the observations was to determine the small scale structure in these enigmatic galaxies, and to attempt to learn something about the nature of their giant branch through the detection of luminosity fluctuations. In two of the three studied galaxies, V7L3 and V1L4, the luminosity fluctuations were unambiguously detected, yielding a density of 2 - 10 red giants/pixel. Using the observed B-V and V-I colors as a constraint, we could find no model that would reproduce the observed fluctuation signal and blue colors if there was a significant population of M-giants in these systems. The third system, V2L8, did not have a detectable fluctuation signal which possibly implies it is not in the Virgo cluster. Interestingly, this system is highly nucleated. Our observations have resolved this nucleus and if V2L8 is in Virgo, then we have discovered what is likely the smallest bulge measured to date, having an effective radius of only 50 pc. This bulge is quite red (as red as giant ellipticals) and its entirely possible that this nucleated dE galaxy, in fact, is a very large galaxy located in the background. As such, it is highly reminiscent of the manner in which Malin-1 was discovered. Finally, we find no evidence for small scale clumping of stars in any of the studied systems at this much improved spatial resolution. This implies these systems are dynamically well-relaxed and that the physical cause of their observed low surface brightnesses is their low density. When imaged at the high spatial resolution of the WFPC2 (~6 pc per pixel), the galaxies are easy to look right through without evening knowing they are present in the very middle of the WFPC2 frame. They appear only as elevated ``sky noise''.