• The so-called "optimal filter" analysis of a microcalorimeter's x-ray pulses is statistically optimal only if all pulses have the same shape, regardless of energy. The shapes of pulses from a nonlinear detector can and do depend on the pulse energy, however. A pulse-fitting procedure that we call "tangent filtering" accounts for the energy dependence of the shape and should therefore achieve superior energy resolution. We take a geometric view of the pulse-fitting problem and give expressions to predict how much the energy resolution stands to benefit from such a procedure. We also demonstrate the method with a case study of K-line fluorescence from several 3d transition metals. The method improves the resolution from 4.9 eV to 4.2 eV at the Cu K$\alpha$ line (8.0keV).
  • High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.
  • The analysis of data from x-ray microcalorimeters requires great care; their excellent intrinsic energy resolution cannot usually be achieved in practice without a statistically near-optimal pulse analysis and corrections for important systematic errors. We describe the essential parts of a pulse-analysis pipeline for data from x-ray microcalorimeters, including steps taken to reduce systematic gain variation and the unwelcome dependence of filtered pulse heights on the exact pulse-arrival time. We find these steps collectively to be essential tools for getting the best results from a microcalorimeter-based x-ray spectrometer.
  • Transition edge sensor microcalorimeters can measure x-ray and gamma-ray energies with very high energy resolution and high photon-collection efficiency. For this technology to reach its full potential in future x-ray observatories, each sensor must be able to measure hundreds or even thousands of photon energies per second. Current "optimal filtering" approaches to achieve the best possible energy resolution work only for photons well isolated in time, a requirement in direct conflict with the need for high-rate measurements. We describe a new analysis procedure to allow fitting for the pulse height of all photons even in the presence of heavy pulse pile-up. In the limit of isolated pulses, the technique reduces to the standard optimal filtering with long records. We employ reasonable approximations to the noise covariance function in order to render multi-pulse fitting computationally viable even for very long data records. The technique is employed to analyze x-ray emission spectra at 600 eV and 6 keV at rates up to 250 counts per second in microcalorimeters having exponential signal decay times of approximately 1.2 ms.