• We use a suite of cosmological zoom galaxy formation simulations and dust radiative transfer calculations to explore the use of the monochromatic 850 $\mu$m luminosity (L$_{\nu,850}$) as a molecular gas mass (M$_{\rm mol}$) estimator in galaxies between $0 < z < 9.5$ for a broad range of masses. For our fiducial simulations, where we assume the dust mass is linearly related to the metal mass, we find that empirical L$_{\nu,850}$-M$_{\rm mol}$ calibrations accurately recover the molecular gas mass of our model galaxies, and that the L$_{\nu,850}$-dependent calibration is preferred. We argue the major driver of scatter in the L$_{\nu,850}$-M$_{\rm mol}$ relation arises from variations in the molecular gas to dust mass ratio, rather than variations in the dust temperature, in agreement with the previous study of Liang et al. Emulating a realistic measurement strategy with ALMA observing bands that are dependent on the source redshift, we find that estimating S$_{\nu,850}$ from continuum emission at a different frequency contributes 10-20% scatter to the L$_{\nu,850}$-M$_{\rm mol}$ relation. This additional scatter arises from a combination of mismatches in assumed T$_{\rm dust}$ and $\beta$ values, as well as the fact that the SEDs are not single-temperature blackbodies. Finally we explore the impact of a dust prescription in which the dust-to-metals ratio varies with metallicity. Though the resulting mean dust temperatures are $\sim 50\%$ higher, the dust mass is significantly decreased for low-metallicity halos. As a result, the observationally calibrated L$_{\nu,850}$-M$_{\rm mol}$ relation holds for massive galaxies, independent of the dust model, but below L$_{\nu,850}\lesssim10^{28}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (metallicities $\log_{10}({\rm Z}/{\rm Z}_{\odot})\lesssim -0.8$) we expect galaxies will deviate from literature observational calibrations by $\gtrsim0.5$ dex.
  • Theoretical models and numerical simulations have established a framework of galaxy evolution in which galaxies merge and create dual supermassive black holes (with separations of one to ten kiloparsecs), which eventually sink into the centre of the merger remnant, emit gravitational waves and coalesce. The merger also triggers star formation and supermassive black hole growth, and gas outflows regulate the stellar content. Although this theoretical picture is supported by recent observations of starburst-driven and supermassive black hole-driven outflows, it remains unclear how these outflows interact with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, the relative contributions of star formation and black hole activity to galactic feedback remain unknown. Here we report observations of dual outflows in the central region of the prototypical merger NGC 6240. We find a black-hole-driven outflow of [O III] to the northeast and a starburst-driven outflow of H{\alpha} to the northwest. The orientations and positions of the outflows allow us to isolate them spatially and study their properties independently. We estimate mass outflow rates of 10 and 75 solar masses per year for the H{\alpha} bubble and the [O III] cone, respectively. Their combined mass outflow is comparable to the star formation rate, suggesting that negative feedback on star formation is occurring.
  • Modeling of the spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the CO molecule can reveal the physical conditions (temperature, density) of molecular gas in Galactic clouds and other galaxies. Recently, the Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA have offered, for the first time, a comprehensive view of the rotational J = 4-3 through J = 13-12 lines, which arise from a complex, diverse range of physical conditions that must be simplified to one, two, or three components when modeled. Here we investigate the recoverability of physical conditions from SLEDs produced by galaxy evolution simulations containing a large dynamical range in physical properties. These simulated SLEDs were generally fit well by one component of gas whose properties largely resemble or slightly underestimate the luminosity-weighted properties of the simulations when clumping due to non-thermal velocity dispersion is taken into account. If only modeling the first three rotational lines, the median values of the marginalized parameter distributions better represent the luminosity-weighted properties of the simulations, but the uncertainties in the fitted parameters are nearly an order of magnitude, compared to approximately 0.2 dex in the "best-case" scenario of a fully sampled SLED through J = 10-9. This study demonstrates that while common CO SLED modeling techniques cannot reveal the underlying complexities of the molecular gas, they can distinguish bulk luminosity-weighted properties that vary with star formation surface densities and galaxy evolution, if a sufficient number of lines are detected and modeled.
  • Feedback in the form of mass outflows driven by star formation or active galactic nuclei is a key component of galaxy evolution. The luminous infrared galaxy Zw 049.057 harbours a compact obscured nucleus with a possible far-IR signature of outflowing molecular gas. Due to the high optical depths at far-IR wavelengths, the interpretation of the outflow signature is uncertain. At mm and radio wavelengths, the radiation is better able to penetrate the large columns of gas and dust. We used high resolution observations from the SMA, ALMA, and the VLA to image the CO 2-1 and 6-5 emission, the 690 GHz continuum, the radio cm continuum, and absorptions by rotationally excited OH. The CO line profiles exhibit wings extending 300 km/s beyond the systemic velocity. At cm wavelengths, we find a compact (40 pc) continuum component in the nucleus, with weaker emission extending several 100 pc approximately along the major and minor axes of the galaxy. In the OH absorption lines toward the compact continuum, wings extending to a similar velocity as for the CO are seen on the blue side of the profile. The weak cm continuum emission along the minor axis is aligned with a highly collimated, jet-like dust feature previously seen in near-IR images of the galaxy. Comparison of the apparent optical depths in the OH lines indicate that the excitation conditions in Zw 049.057 differ from those in other OH megamaser galaxies. We interpret the wings in the spectral lines as signatures of a molecular outflow. A relation between this outflow and the minor axis radio feature is possible, although further studies are required to investigate this possible association and understand the connection between the outflow and the nuclear activity. Finally, we suggest that the differing OH excitation conditions are further evidence that Zw 049.057 is in a transition phase between megamaser and kilomaser activity.
  • Interactions between pairs of isolated dwarf galaxies provide a critical window into low-mass hierarchical, gas-dominated galaxy assembly and the buildup of stellar mass in low-metallicity systems. We present the first VLT/MUSE optical IFU observations of the interacting dwarf pair dm1647+21, selected from the TiNy Titans survey. The H$\alpha$ emission is widespread and corresponds to a total unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of 0.44 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, 2.7 times higher than the SFR inferred from SDSS data. The implied specific SFR (sSFR) for the system is elevated by more than an order of magnitude above non-interacting dwarfs in the same mass range. This increase is dominated by the lower-mass galaxy, which has a sSFR enhancement of $>$ 50. Examining the spatially-resolved maps of classic optical line diagnostics, we find the ISM excitation can be fully explained by star formation. The velocity field of the ionized gas is not consistent with simple rotation. Dynamical simulations indicate that the irregular velocity field and the stellar structure is consistent with the identification of this system as an ongoing interaction between two dwarf galaxies. The widespread, clumpy enhancements in star formation in this system point to important differences in the effect of mergers on dwarf galaxies, compared to massive galaxies: rather than the funneling of gas to the nucleus and giving rise to a nuclear starburst, starbursts in low-mass galaxy mergers may be triggered by large-scale ISM compression, and thus be more distributed.
  • We present an analysis of [OI]63, [OIII]88, [NII]122 and [CII]158 far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line observations obtained with Herschel/PACS, for ~240 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We find pronounced declines -deficits- of line-to-FIR-continuum emission for [NII]122, [OI]63 and [CII]158 as a function of FIR color and infrared luminosity surface density, $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$. The median electron density of the ionized gas in LIRGs, based on the [NII]122/[NII]205 ratio, is $n_{\rm e}$ = 41 cm$^{-3}$. We find that the dispersion in the [CII]158 deficit of LIRGs is attributed to a varying fractional contribution of photo-dissociation-regions (PDRs) to the observed [CII]158 emission, f([CII]PDR) = [CII]PDR/[CII], which increases from ~60% to ~95% in the warmest LIRGs. The [OI]63/[CII]158PDR ratio is tightly correlated with the PDR gas kinetic temperature in sources where [OI]63 is not optically-thick or self-absorbed. For each galaxy, we derive the average PDR hydrogen density, $n_{\rm H}$, and intensity of the interstellar radiation field, in units of G$_0$, and find G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ ratios ~0.1-50 cm$^3$, with ULIRGs populating the upper end of the distribution. There is a relation between G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ and $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$, showing a critical break at $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$ ~ 5 x 10$^{10}$ Lsun/kpc$^2$. Below $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$, G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ remains constant, ~0.32 cm$^3$, and variations in $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$ are driven by the number density of star-forming regions within a galaxy, with no change in their PDR properties. Above $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$, G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ increases rapidly with $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$, signaling a departure from the typical PDR conditions found in normal star-forming galaxies towards more intense/harder radiation fields and compact geometries typical of starbursting sources.
  • We present Very Large Array observations of the 33 GHz radio continuum emission from 22 local ultraluminous and luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (U/LIRGs). These observations have spatial (angular) resolutions of 30--720 pc (0.07"-0.67") in a part of the spectrum that is likely to be optically thin. This allows us to estimate the size of the energetically dominant regions. We find half-light radii from 30 pc to 1.7 kpc. The 33 GHz flux density correlates well with the IR emission, and we take these sizes as indicative of the size of the region that produces most of the energy. Combining our 33 GHz sizes with unresolved measurements, we estimate the IR luminosity and star formation rate per area, and the molecular gas surface and volume densities. These quantities span a wide range (4 dex) and include some of the highest values measured for any galaxy (e.g., $\mathrm{\Sigma_{SFR}^{33GHz} \leq 10^{4.1} M_{\odot} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}}$). At least $13$ sources appear Compton thick ($\mathrm{N_{H}^{33GHz} \geq 10^{24} cm^{-2}}$). Consistent with previous work, contrasting these data with observations of normal disk galaxies suggests a nonlinear and likely multi-valued relation between SFR and molecular gas surface density, though this result depends on the adopted CO-to-H$_{2}$ conversion factor and the assumption that our 33 GHz sizes apply to the gas. 11 sources appear to exceed the luminosity surface density predicted for starbursts supported by radiation pressure and supernovae feedback, however we note the need for more detailed observations of the inner disk structure. U/LIRGs with higher surface brightness exhibit stronger [{\sc Cii}] 158$\mu$m deficits, consistent with the suggestion that high energy densities drive this phenomenon.
  • We present the results of a {\it Hubble Space Telescope} ACS/HRC FUV, ACS/WFC optical study into the cluster populations of a sample of 22 Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. Through integrated broadband photometry we have derived ages and masses for a total of 484 star clusters contained within these systems. This allows us to examine the properties of star clusters found in the extreme environments of LIRGs relative to lower luminosity star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. We find that by adopting a Bruzual \& Charlot simple stellar population (SSP) model and Salpeter initial mass function, the age distribution of clusters declines as $dN/d\tau = \tau^{-0.9 +/- 0.3}$, consistent with the age distribution derived for the Antennae Galaxies, and interpreted as evidence for rapid cluster disruption occuring in the strong tidal fields of merging galaxies. The large number of $10^{6} M_{\odot}$ young clusters identified in the sample also suggests that LIRGs are capable of producing more high-mass clusters than what is observed to date in any lower luminosity star-forming galaxy in the local Universe. The observed cluster mass distribution of $dN/dM = M^{-1.95 +/- 0.11}$ is consistent with the canonical -2 power law used to describe the underlying initial cluster mass function (ICMF) for a wide range of galactic environments. We interpret this as evidence against mass-dependent cluster disruption, which would flatten the observed CMF relative to the underlying ICMF distribution.
  • We have carried out a systematic search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBH) using the Chandra Source and SDSS Cross Matched Catalog. From the survey, we have detected a potential rSMBH, 'CXO J101527.2+625911' at z=0.3504. The CXO J101527.2+625911 has a spatially offset (1.26$\pm$0.05 kpc) active SMBH and kinematically offset broad emission lines (175$\pm$25 km s$^{\rm -1}$ relative to systemic velocity). The observed spatial and velocity offsets suggest this galaxy could be a rSMBH, but we also have considered a possibility of dual SMBH scenario. The column density towards the galaxy center was found to be Compton thin, but no X-ray source was detected. The non-detection of the X-ray source in the nucleus suggests either there is no obscured actively accreting SMBH, or there exists an SMBH but has a low accretion rate (i.e. low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN)). The possibility of the LLAGN was investigated and found to be unlikely based on the H$\alpha$ luminosity, radio power, and kinematic arguments. This, along with the null detection of X-ray source in the nucleus supports our hypothesis that the CXO J101527.2+625911 is a rSMBH. Our GALFIT analysis shows the host galaxy to be a bulge-dominated elliptical. The weak morphological disturbance and small spatial and velocity offsets suggest that CXO J101527.2+625911 could be in the final stage of merging process and about to turn into a normal elliptical galaxy.
  • Mergers of galaxies are thought to cause significant gas inflows to the inner parsecs, which can activate rapid accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), giving rise to Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). During a significant fraction of this process, SMBHs are predicted to be enshrouded by gas and dust. Studying 52 galactic nuclei in infrared-selected local Luminous and Ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages in the hard X-ray band, where radiation is less affected by absorption, we find that the amount of material around SMBHs increases during the last phases of the merger. We find that the fraction of Compton-thick (CT, $N_{\rm\,H}\geq 10^{24}\rm\,cm^{-2}$) AGN in late merger galaxies is higher ($f_{\rm\,CT}=65^{+12}_{-13}\%$) than in local hard X-ray selected AGN ($f_{\rm\,CT}=27\pm 4\%$), and that obscuration reaches its maximum when the nuclei of the two merging galaxies are at a projected distance of $D_{12}\simeq0.4-10.8$ kiloparsecs ($f_{\rm\,CT}=77_{-17}^{+13}\%$). We also find that all AGN of our sample in late merger galaxies have $N_{\rm\,H}> 10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$, which implies that the obscuring material covers $95^{+4}_{-8}\%$ of the X-ray source. These observations show that the material is most effectively funnelled from the galactic scale to the inner tens of parsecs during the late stages of galaxy mergers, and that the close environment of SMBHs in advanced mergers is richer in gas and dust with respect to that of SMBHs in isolated galaxies, and cannot be explained by the classical AGN unification model in which the torus is responsible for the obscuration.
  • Far-infrared (FIR) images and photometry are presented for 201 Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies [LIRGs: log$(L_{\rm IR}/L_\odot) = 11.00 - 11.99$, ULIRGs: log$(L_{\rm IR}/L_\odot) = 12.00 - 12.99$], in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) based on observations with the $Herschel$ $Space$ $Observatory$ Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments. The image atlas displays each GOALS target in the three PACS bands (70, 100, and 160 $\mu$m) and the three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m), optimized to reveal structures at both high and low surface brightness levels, with images scaled to simplify comparison of structures in the same physical areas of $\sim$$100\times100$ kpc$^2$. Flux densities of companion galaxies in merging systems are provided where possible, depending on their angular separation and the spatial resolution in each passband, along with integrated system fluxes (sum of components). This dataset constitutes the imaging and photometric component of the GOALS Herschel OT1 observing program, and is complementary to atlases presented for the Hubble Space Telescope (Evans et al. 2017, in prep.), Spitzer Space Telescope (Mazzarella et al. 2017, in prep.), and Chandra X-ray Observatory (Iwasawa et al. 2011, 2017, in prep.). Collectively these data will enable a wide range of detailed studies of AGN and starburst activity within the most luminous infrared galaxies in the local Universe.
  • We present new ALMA Band 7 ($\sim340$ GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120-5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4-3) emission, relative to HCO$^+$ (4-3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of $\sim1.2$ yr$^{-1}$, the high HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high $\Sigma_{IR}$ of $4.7\times10^{12}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H$_2$O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of $\sim40$ K. IRAS 13120-5453 has a lower dust temperature and $\Sigma_{IR}$ than is inferred for the systems termed "compact obscured nuclei" (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120-5453 has undergone a compact obscured nucleus phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/AGN core.
  • We present new IRAM 30m spectroscopic observations of the $\sim88$ GHz band, including emission from the CCH (n=1-0) multiplet, HCN (1-0), HCO+ (1-0), and HNC (1-0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems ($\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\rangle=1.84$), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems ($\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\rangle=1.14$, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}$ ratios comparable to those of AGN, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely associated with energetically dominant AGN. After removing AGN-dominated systems from the sample, we find a linear relationship (within the uncertainties) between $\log_{10}$(L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$) and $\log_{10}$(L$_{IR}$), consistent with most previous findings. L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L$_{IR}$, typically interpreted as the dense gas depletion time, appears to have no systematic trend with L$_{IR}$ for our sample of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and has significant scatter. The galaxy-integrated HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) emission do not appear to have a simple interpretation, in terms of the AGN dominance or the star formation rate, and are likely determined by multiple processes, including density and radiative effects.
  • We have performed a spectral decomposition to search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBH) in the SDSS QSOs with $z<0.25$. Out of 1271 QSOs, we have identified 26 rSMBH candidates that are recoiling toward us. The projected recoil velocities range from $-76\ \kms$ to $-307\ \kms$ with a mean of $-149\pm58\ \kms$. Most of the rSMBH candidates are hosted by gas-rich LIRGs/ULIRGs, but only 23\% of them shows signs of tidal features suggesting majority of them are advanced mergers. We find that the black hole masses $M_{BH}$ of the rSMBH candidates are on average $\sim$5 times smaller than that of their stationary counterparts and cause a scatter in $M_{BH}-\sigma_*$ relation. The Eddington ratios of all of the rSMBH candidates are larger than 0.1, with mean of 0.52$\pm$0.27, suggesting they are actively accreting mass. Velocity shifts in high-excitation coronal lines suggest that the rSMBH candidates are recoiling with an average velocity of about $-265\ \kms$. Electron density in the narrow line region of the H II rSMBH candidates is about 1/10 of that in AGN rSMBH candidates probably because AGN in the former was more spatially offset than that in the latter. The estimated spatial offsets between the rSMBH candidate and center of host galaxy range from 0.21\as \ to 1.97\as \ and need to be confirmed spatially with high-resolution adaptive optics imaging observations.
  • We report the detection of a heavily obscured Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) in the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 6286, identified in a 17.5 ks NuSTAR observation. The source is in an early merging stage, and was targeted as part of our ongoing NuSTAR campaign observing local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages. NGC 6286 is clearly detected above 10 keV and, by including the quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT and archival XMM-Newton and Chandra data, we find that the source is heavily obscured [$N_{\rm\,H}\simeq (0.95-1.32)\times 10^{24}\rm\,cm^{-2}$], with a column density consistent with being Compton-thick [CT, $\log (N_{\rm\,H}/\rm cm^{-2})\geq 24$]. The AGN in NGC 6286 has a low absorption-corrected luminosity ($L_{2-10\rm\,keV}\sim 3-20\times 10^{41}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$) and contributes $\lesssim$1\% to the energetics of the system. Because of its low-luminosity, previous observations carried out in the soft X-ray band ($<10$ keV) and in the infrared did not notice the presence of a buried AGN. NGC 6286 has multi-wavelength characteristics typical of objects with the same infrared luminosity and in the same merger stage, which might imply that there is a significant population of obscured low-luminosity AGN in LIRGs that can only be detected by sensitive hard X-ray observations.
  • Luminous infrared galaxies are systems enshrouded in dust, which absorbs most of their optical/UV emission and re-radiates it in the mid- and far-infrared. Radio observations are largely unaffected by dust obscuration, enabling us to study the central regions of LIRGs in an unbiased manner. The main goal of this project is to examine how the radio properties of local LIRGs relate to their infrared spectral characteristics. Here we present an analysis of the radio continuum properties of a subset of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which consists of 202 nearby systems (z<0.088). Our radio sample consists of 35 systems, or 46 individual galaxies, that were observed at both 1.49 and 8.44 GHz with the VLA with a resolution of about 1 arcsec (FWHM). The aim of the project is to use the radio imagery to probe the central kpc of these LIRGs in search of active galactic nuclei. We used the archival data at 1.49 and 8.44 GHz to create radio-spectral-index maps using the standard relation between flux density Sv and frequency v, S~v^-a, where a is the radio spectral index. By studying the spatial variations in a, we classified the objects as radio-AGN, radio-SB, and AGN/SB (a mixture). We identified the presence of an active nucleus using the radio morphology, deviations from the radio/infrared correlation, and spatially resolved spectral index maps, and then correlated this to the usual mid-infrared ([NeV]/[NeII] and [OIV]/[NeII] line ratios and EQW of the 6.2 um PAH feature) and optical (BPT diagram) AGN diagnostics. We find that 21 out of the 46 objects in our sample are radio-AGN, 9 are classified as starbursts (SB), and 16 are AGN/SB. After comparing to other AGN diagnostics we find 3 objects out of the 46 that are identified as AGN based on the radio analysis, but are not classified as such based on the mid-infrared and optical AGN diagnostics presented in this study.
  • We present dynamical models of four interacting systems: NGC 5257/8, The Mice, the Antennae, and NGC 2623. The parameter space of the encounters are constrained using the Identikit model-matching and visualization tool. Identikit utilizes hybrid N-body and test particle simulations to enable rapid exploration of the parameter space of galaxy mergers. The Identikit-derived matches of these systems are reproduced with self-consistent collisionless simulations which show very similar results. The models generally reproduce the observed morphology and \HI\ kinematics of the tidal tails in these systems with reasonable properties inferred for the progenitor galaxies. The models presented here are the first to appear in the literature for NGC 5257/8 and NGC 2623, and The Mice and the Antennae are compared with previously published models. Based on the assumed mass model and our derived initial conditions, the models indicate the four systems are currently being viewed 175-260 Myr after first passage and cover a wide range of merger stages. In some instances there are mismatches between the models and the data (e.g., in the length of a tail); these are likely due to our adoption of a single mass model for all galaxies. Despite the use of a single mass model, these results demonstrate the utility of Identikit in constraining the parameter space for galaxy mergers when applied to real data.
  • A {\it Hubble Space Telescope} ({\it HST}) / Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) study of the structural properties of 85 luminous and ultraluminous ($L_{\rm IR} > 10^{11.4}$ L$_\odot$) infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample is presented. Two-dimensional GALFIT analysis has been performed on F814W "{\it I}-band" images to decompose each galaxy, as appropriate, into bulge, disk, central PSF and stellar bar components. The fraction of bulge-less disk systems is observed to be higher in LIRGs (35%) than in ULIRGs (20%), with the disk+bulge systems making up the dominant fraction of both LIRGs (55%) and ULIRGs (45%). Further, bulge+disk systems are the dominant late-stage merger galaxy type and are the dominant type for LIRGs and ULIRGs at almost every stage of galaxy-galaxy nuclear separation. The mean {\it I}-band host absolute magnitude of the GOALS galaxies is $-22.64\pm$0.62 mag (1.8$^{+1.4}_{-0.4}$ L$^*_I$), and the mean bulge absolute magnitude in GOALS galaxies is about 1.1 magnitude fainter than the mean host magnitude. Almost all ULIRGs have bulge magnitudes at the high end (-20.6 to - 23.5 mag) of the GOALS bulge magnitude range. Mass ratios in the GOALS binary systems are consistent with most of the galaxies being the result of major mergers, and an examination of the residual-to-host intensity ratios in GOALS binary systems suggests that smaller companions suffer more tidal distortion than the larger companions. We find approximately twice as many bars in GOALS disk+bulge systems (32.8%) than in pure-disk mergers (15.9%) but most of the disk+bulge systems that contain bars are disk-dominated with small bulges. The bar-to-host intensity ratio, bar half-light radius, and bar ellipticity in GOALS galaxies are similar to those found in nearby spiral galaxies.(abridged)
  • We present new Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of Cygnus A, one of the most luminous radio sources in the local universe. Data on the inner 20" are combined with new reductions of MIPS and IRAC photometry as well as data from the literature to form a radio through mid-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). This SED is then modeled as a combination of torus reprocessed active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation, dust enshrouded starburst, and a synchrotron jet. This combination of physically motivated components successfully reproduces the observed emission over almost 5 dex in frequency. The bolometric AGN luminosity is found to be 10^12 L_\odot (90% of LIR), with a clumpy AGN-heated dust medium extending to \sim130 pc from the supermassive black hole. Evidence is seen for a break or cutoff in the core synchrotron emission. The associated population of relativistic electrons could in principle be responsible for some of the observed X-ray emission though the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism. The SED requires a cool dust component, consistent with dust-reprocessed radiation from ongoing star formation. Star formation contributes at least 6 \times 10^10 L_\odot to the bolometric output of Cygnus A, corresponding to a star formation rate of \sim10 M_\odot yr-1.
  • The Spitzer Space Telescope provides a unique view of the Universe at infrared wavelengths. Improved sensitivity and angular resolution over previous missions enable detailed studies of astrophysical objects, both in imaging and spectroscopic modes. Spitzer observations of active galactic nuclei can help shed light on the physical conditions of the central regions of these active glalaxies. The nearby radio galaxy Cygnus A is one of the most luminous radio sources in the local Universe. In addition to the high radio power, it is also very luminous in the infrared. New Spitzer spectroscopy and photometry of Cygnus A is combined with data from the literature at radio and sub-mm wavelengths. The resulting complication is modeled with a combination of: a synchrotron emitting jet, a burst of star formation, and emission from an AGN torus. The infrared emission in Cyngus A shows contributions from all three processes and the models are able to reproduce the observed emission over almost 5 dex in frequency. The bolometric AGN luminosity is found to be ~10^45 erg s^-1, with a clumpy torus size of ~7 pc. Evidence is seen for a break in the synchrotron spectrum in the mid-infrared. The relevant component of the infrared emission suggests Cygnus A has a star formation rate of ~20 M_sun yr^-1. Even in the absence of the AGN, it would still be a luminous infrared source.
  • We present HST/WFPC2 Linear Ramp Filter images of high surface brightness emission lines (either [OII], [OIII], or H-alpha+[NII]) in 80 3CR radio sources. We overlay the emission line images on high resolution VLA radio images (eight of which are new reductions of archival data) in order to examine the spatial relationship between the optical and radio emission. We confirm that the radio and optical emission line structures are consistent with weak alignment at low redshift (z < 0.6) except in the Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies where both the radio source and the emission line nebulae are on galactic scales and strong alignment is seen at all redshifts. There are weak trends for the aligned emission line nebulae to be more luminous, and for the emission line nebula size to increase with redshift and/or radio power. The combination of these results suggests that there is a limited but real capacity for the radio source to influence the properties of the emission line nebulae at these low redshifts (z < 0.6). Our results are consistent with previous suggestions that both mechanical and radiant energy are responsible for generating alignment between the radio source and emission line gas.