• We cross-correlate the largest available Mid-Infrared (WISE), X-ray (3XMM) and Radio (FIRST+NVSS) catalogues to define the MIXR sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies. We pre-classify the sources based on their positions on the WISE colour/colour plot, showing that the MIXR triple selection is extremely effective to diagnose the star formation and AGN activity of individual populations, even on a flux/magnitude basis, extending the diagnostics to objects with luminosities and redshifts from SDSS DR12. We recover the radio/mid-IR star formation correlation with great accuracy, and use it to classify our sources, based on their activity, as radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN, LERGs/LINERs, and non-AGN galaxies. These diagnostics can prove extremely useful for large AGN and galaxy samples, and help develop ways to efficiently triage sources when data from the next generation of instruments becomes available. We study bias in detail, and show that while the widely-used WISE colour selections for AGN are very successful at cleanly selecting samples of luminous AGN, they miss or misclassify a substantial fraction of AGN at lower luminosities and/or higher redshifts. MIXR also allows us to test the relation between radiative and kinetic (jet) power in radio-loud AGN, for which a tight correlation is expected due to a mutual dependence on accretion. Our results highlight that long-term AGN variability, jet regulation, and other factors affecting the $Q/L$$_{bol}$ relation, are introducing a vast amount of scatter in this relation, with dramatic potential consequences on our current understanding of AGN feedback and its effect on star formation.
  • We create broadband SEDs of 761 type 1 AGN. The Scott et al. sample, created by a cross-correlation of the optical SDSS DR5 quasar catalogue and the 2XMMi catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources, is further matched with the FIRST catalogue of radio sources, the WISE MIR all-sky data release, the 2MASS NIR point source catalogue, the UKIDSS DR9 Large Area Survey and the GALEX all-sky and medium UV imaging surveys. This allows broadband SEDs covering log(nu)~9.2-18.1 to be created. We investigate variations in the SED shape by binning a subsample of 237 AGN with the best quality SEDs according to their X-ray spectral parameters, their AGN sub-type and their luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio. The AGN sub-populations show some significant differences in their SEDs; X-ray absorbed AGN show a deficit of emission at X-ray/UV frequencies and an excess in the MIR consistent with absorption and re-emission, radio-loud AGN show increased radio and X-ray emission, consistent with the presence of a jet component in addition to the emission seen from radio-quiet AGN and the SEDs of NLS1s only differ from other type 1s in the X-ray regime, suggesting any physical differences are limited to their X-ray emitting region. Binning the AGN according to underlying physical parameters reveals more subtle differences in the SEDs. The X-ray spectral slope does not appear to have any influence or dependence on the multiwavelength emission in the rest of the SED. The contribution of X-rays to Lbol is lower in higher luminosity sources, and relatively more emission in the optical/UV is seen in AGN with higher Lx. Variations in the relative flux and peak frequency of the BBB are observed and may suggest higher inner disc temperatures with increasing accretion rates. Overall, we find that the diversity in the SED shapes is relatively small, and we find no apparent single driver for the variations.
  • In this paper we examine the percentage of type 1 AGN which require the inclusion of a soft excess component and/or significant cold absorption in the modelling of their X-ray spectra obtained by XMM-Newton. We do this by simulating spectra which mimic typical spectral shapes in order to find the maximum detectability expected at different count levels. We then apply a correction to the observed percentages found for the Scott et al. (2011) sample of 761 sources. We estimate the true percentage of AGN with a soft excess component to be 75+/-23%, suggesting that soft excesses are ubiquitous in the X-ray spectra of type 1 AGN. By carrying out joint fits on groups of low count spectra in narrow z bins in which additional spectral components were not originally detected, we show that the soft excess feature is recovered with a mean temperature kT and blackbody to power-law normalisation ratio consistent with those of components detected in individual high count spectra. Cold absorption with nH values broadly consistent with those reported in individual spectra are also recovered. We suggest such intrinsic cold absorption is found in a minimum of ~5% of type 1 AGN and may be present in up to ~10%.
  • We present the angular correlation function of the X-ray population of 1063 XMM-Newton observations at high Galactic latitudes, comprising up to ~30000 sources over a sky area of ~125 sq. degrees in the energy bands: soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV). This is the largest sample of serendipitous X-ray sources ever used for clustering analysis purposes to date and the results have been determined with unprecedented accuracy. We detect significant clustering signals in the soft and hard bands (~10 sigma and ~5 sigma, respectively). We deproject the angular correlation function via Limber's equation and calculate the typical spatial lengths. We infer that AGN at redshifts ~1 are embedded in dark matter halos with typical masses of log M ~ 12.6/h Msol and lifetimes in the range ~3-5 x 10^8 years, which indicates that AGN activity is a transient phase in the life of galaxies.
  • In this paper we present the two-point angular correlation function of the X-ray source population of 1063 XMM-Newton observations at high Galactic latitudes, comprising up to ~30000 sources over a sky area of 125.5 sq. deg, in three energy bands: 0.5-2 (soft), 2-10 (hard), and 4.5-10 (ultrahard) keV. We have measured the angular clustering of our survey and find significant positive clustering signals in the soft and hard bands, and a marginal clustering detection in the ultrahard band. We find dependency of the clustering strength on the flux limit and no significant differences in the clustering properties between sources with high hardness ratios and those with low hardness ratios. Our results show that obscured and unobscured objects share similar clustering properties and therefore they both reside in similar environments, in agreement with the unified model of AGN. We deprojected the angular clustering parameters via Limber's equation to compute their typical spatial lengths. From that we have inferred the typical mass of the dark matter haloes in which AGN at redshifts of ~1 are embedded. The short AGN lifetimes derived suggest that AGN activity might be a transient phase that can be experienced several times by a large fraction of galaxies throughout their lives.
  • We present the XMM-Newton Medium sensitivity Survey (XMS), including a total of 318 X-ray sources found among the serendipitous content of 25 XMM-Newton target fields. The XMS comprises four largely overlapping source samples selected at soft (0.5-2 keV), intermediate (0.5-4.5 keV), hard (2-10 keV) and ultra-hard (4.5-7.5 keV) bands, the first three of them being flux-limited. We report on the optical identification of the XMS samples, complete to 85-95%. At the intermediate flux levels sampled by the XMS we find that the X-ray sky is largely dominated by Active Galactic Nuclei. The fraction of stars in soft X-ray selected samples is below 10%, and only a few per cent for hard selected samples. We find that the fraction of optically obscured objects in the AGN population stays constant at around 15-20% for soft and intermediate band selected X-ray sources, over 2 decades of flux. The fraction of obscured objects amongst the AGN population is larger (~35-45%) in the hard or ultra-hard selected samples, and constant across a similarly wide flux range. The distribution in X-ray-to-optical flux ratio is a strong function of the selection band, with a larger fraction of sources with high values in hard selected samples. Sources with X-ray-to-optical flux ratios in excess of 10 are dominated by obscured AGN, but with a significant contribution from unobscured AGN.
  • We present the results from a shallow (2-10 ksec) XMM/2dF survey. Our survey covers 18 XMM fields ($\sim 5 {\rm deg}^2$) previously spectroscopically followed up with the Anglo-Australian telescope 2-degree field facility. About half of the fields are also covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We are searching for extended sources using the XMM SAS maximum likelihood algorithm in the 0.3-2 keV band and we have detected 14 candidate clusters down to a flux of $\sim2\times10^{-14} cgs$. Our preliminary results show that: i) the redshift distribution peaks at relatively high redshifts ($\sim0.4$) as expected from the Rosati et al. $\Phi(L)$, ii) some of our X-ray clusters appear to have optical counterparts.