• We explore, both experimentally and theoretically, the response of an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate to modulated interactions. We identify two distinct regimes differing in modulation frequency and modulation strength. Longitudinal surface waves are generated either resonantly or parametrically for modulation frequencies near the radial trap frequency or twice the trap frequency, respectively. The dispersion of these waves, the latter being a Faraday wave, is well-reproduced by a mean-field theory that accounts for the 3D nature of the elongated condensate. In contrast, in the regime of lower modulation frequencies we find that no clear resonances occur, but with increased modulation strength, the condensate forms an irregular granulated distribution that is outside the scope of a mean-field approach. We find that the granulated condensate is characterized by large quantum fluctuations and correlations, which are well-described with single-shot simulations obtained from wavefunctions computed by a beyond mean-field theory at zero temperature, the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons method.
  • We present an alternative method for determining the sound velocity in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, based on thermodynamic global variables. The total number of trapped atoms was as a function of temperature carefully studied across the phase transition, at constant volume. It allowed us to evaluate the sound velocity resulting in consistent values from the quantum to classical regime, in good agreement with previous results found in literature. We also provide some insight about the dominant sound mode (thermal or superfluid) across a wide temperature range.
  • The vortex nucleation and the emergence of quantum turbulence induced by oscillating magnetic fields, introduced by Henn E A L, et al. 2009 (Phys. Rev. A 79, 043619) and Henn E A L, et al. 2009 (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045301), left a few open questions concerning the basic mechanisms causing those interesting phenomena. Here, we report the experimental observation of the slosh dynamics of a magnetically trapped $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) under the influence of a time-varying magnetic field. We observed a clear relative displacement in between the condensed and the thermal fraction center-of-mass. We have identified this relative counter move as an out-of-phase oscillation mode, which is able to produce ripples on the condensed/thermal fractions interface. The out-of-phase mode can be included as a possible mechanism involved in the vortex nucleation and further evolution when excited by time dependent magnetic fields.
  • We investigate the evolution of the momentum distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate subjected to an external small oscillatory perturbation as a function of the in-trap evolution of the condensate after the external perturbation is switched-off. Besides changing its momentum distribution, we observe that the cloud distributes the input energy among its normal collective modes, displaying center-of-mass dipolar mode and quadrupolar mode. While the dipolar mode can be easily disregarded, we show that the momentum distribution is closely tied to the quadrupolar oscillation mode. This convolution hinders the actual momentum distribution.
  • A novel concept of quantum turbulence in finite size superfluids, such as trapped bosonic atoms, is discussed. We have used an atomic $^{87}\mathrm{Rb}$ BEC to study the emergence of this phenomenon. In our experiment, the transition to the quantum turbulent regime is characterized by a tangled vortex lines formation, controlled by the amplitude and time duration of the excitation produced by an external oscillating field. A simple model is suggested to account for the experimental observations. The transition from the non-turbulent to the turbulent regime is a rather gradual crossover. But it takes place in a sharp enough way, allowing for the definition of an effective critical line separating the regimes. Quantum turbulence emerging in a finite-size superfluid may be a new idea helpful for revealing important features associated to turbulence, a more general and broad phenomenon.