• We present a thermal emission spectrum of the bloated hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab from a single eclipse observation made in spatial scan mode with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectrum covers the wavelength regime from 1.123 to 1.644 microns which is binned into 14 eclipse depths measured to an averaged precision of 104 parts-per million. The spectrum is unaffected by a dilution from the close M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B, which was fully resolved. We complemented our spectrum with literature results and performed a comparative forward and retrieval analysis with the 1D radiative-convective ATMO model. Assuming solar abundance of the planet atmosphere, we find that the measured spectrum can best be explained by the spectrum of a blackbody isothermal atmosphere with Tp = 1995 +/- 17K, but can equally-well be described by a spectrum with modest thermal inversion. The retrieved spectrum suggests emission from VO at the WFC3 wavelengths and no evidence of the 1.4 micron water feature. The emission models with temperature profiles decreasing with height are rejected at a high confidence. An isothermal or inverted spectrum can imply a clear atmosphere with an absorber, a dusty cloud deck or a combination of both. We find that the planet can have continuum of values for the albedo and recirculation, ranging from high albedo and poor recirculation to low albedo and efficient recirculation. Optical spectroscopy of the planet's day-side or thermal emission phase curves can potentially resolve the current albedo with recirculation degeneracy.
  • We present the detection of potassium in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b using optical transit narrowband photometry. The results are obtained using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) together with the OSIRIS instrument in tunable filter imaging mode. We observed four transits, two at continuum wavelengths outside the potassium feature, at 6792 {\AA} and 8844 {\AA}, and two probing the potassium feature in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and the line core at 7664.9 {\AA} using a 12 {\AA} filter width (R~650). The planet-to-star radius ratios in the continuum are found to be $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1176 $\pm$ 0.0013 at 6792 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1168 $\pm$ 0.0022 at 8844 {\AA}, significantly lower than the two observations in the potassium line: $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1248 $\pm$ 0.0014 in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1268 $\pm$ 0.0012 in the line core at 7664.9 {\AA}. With a weighted mean of the observations outside the potassium feature $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1174 $\pm$ 0.0010, the potassium is detected as an increase in the radius ratio of {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0073 $\pm$ 0.0017 at 7582.0 {\AA} and {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0094 $\pm$ 0.0016 at 7664.9 {\AA} (a significance of 4.3 and 6.1 $\sigma$ respectively). We hypothesise that the strong detection of potassium is caused by a large scale height, which can be explained by a high-temperature at the base of the upper atmosphere. A lower mean molecular mass caused by the dissociation of molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen by the EUV flux from the host star may also partly explain the amplitude of our detection.
  • The discovery of OI atoms and CII ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet's Roche lobe. The derived ~10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, CII absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by SiIII ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS dataset showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar SiIII and CII emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5 and 3.1% flux variations are large compared to their reported 8.2+/-1.4% and 7.8+/-1.3% transit absorptions. Significant variations also appear in the stellar line shapes, questioning reported velocity signatures. We furthermore present archive STIS G140M transit data consistent with no SiIII absorption, with a negative result of 1.7+/-18.7 including ~15% variability. Silicon may still be present at lower ionization states, in parallel with the recent detection of extended magnesium, as MgI atoms. In this frame, the firm detection of OI and CII implying solar or supersolar abundances contradicts the recent inference of potential x20-125 subsolar metallicity for HD 209458b.
  • Exoplanet science is now in its full expansion, particularly after the CoRoT and Kepler space missions that led us to the discovery of thousands of extra-solar planets. The last decade has taught us that UV observations play a major role in advancing our understanding of planets and of their host stars, but the necessary UV observations can be carried out only by HST, and this is going to be the case for many years to come. It is therefore crucial to build a treasury data archive of UV exoplanet observations formed by a dozen "golden systems" for which observations will be available from the UV to the infrared. Only in this way we will be able to fully exploit JWST observations for exoplanet science, one of the key JWST science case.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-IR transmission spectra of the transiting hot-Jupiter WASP-31b. The spectrum covers 0.3-1.7 $\mu$m at a resolution $R\sim$70, which we combine with Spitzer photometry to cover the full-optical to IR. The spectrum is dominated by a cloud-deck with a flat transmission spectrum which is apparent at wavelengths $>0.52\mu$m. The cloud deck is present at high altitudes and low pressures, as it covers the majority of the expected optical Na line and near-IR H$_2$O features. While Na I absorption is not clearly identified, the resulting spectrum does show a very strong potassium feature detected at the 4.2-$\sigma$ confidence level. Broadened alkali wings are not detected, indicating pressures below $\sim$10 mbar. The lack of Na and strong K is the first indication of a sub-solar Na/K abundance ratio in a planetary atmosphere (ln[Na/K]$=-3.3\pm2.8$), which could potentially be explained by Na condensation on the planet's night side, or primordial abundance variations. A strong Rayleigh scattering signature is detected at short wavelengths, with a 4-$\sigma$ significant slope. Two distinct aerosol size populations can explain the spectra, with a smaller sub-micron size grain population reaching high altitudes producing a blue Rayleigh scattering signature on top of a larger, lower-lying population responsible for the flat cloud deck at longer wavelengths. We estimate that the atmospheric circulation is sufficiently strong to mix micron size particles upward to the required 1-10 mbar pressures, necessary to explain the cloud deck. These results further confirm the importance of clouds in hot-Jupiters, which can potentially dominate the overall spectra and may alter the abundances of key gaseous species.
  • We present narrow-band photometric measurements of the exoplanet GJ 1214b using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the OSIRIS instrument. Using tuneable filters we observed a total of five transits, three of which were observed at two wavelengths nearly simultaneously, producing a total of eight individual light curves, six of these probed the possible existence of a methane absorption feature in the 8770 - 8850 {\AA} region at high resolution. We detect no increase in the planet-to-star radius ratio across the methane feature with a change in radius ratio of $\Delta$R = -0.0007 $\pm$ 0.0017 corresponding to a scale height (H) change of -0.5 $\pm$ 1.2 H across the methane feature, assuming a hydrogen dominated atmosphere. We find a variety of water and cloudy atmospheric models fit the data well, but find that cloud-free models provide poor fits. These observations support a flat transmission spectrum resulting from the presence of a high-altitude haze or a water-rich atmosphere, in agreement with previous studies. In this study the observations are predominantly limited by the photometric quality and the limited number of data points (resulting from a long observing cadence), which make the determination of the systematic noise challenging. With tuneable filters capable of high resolution measurements (R ~ 600 - 750) of narrow absorption features, the interpretation of our results are also limited by the absence of high resolution methane models below 1 $\mu$m.
  • We present an optical to near-infrared transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-1b, based on HST observations, covering the spectral regime from 0.29 to 1.027{\mu}m with STIS, which is coupled with a recent WFC3 transit (1.087 to 1.687{\mu}m). We derive refined physical parameters of the HAT-P-1 system, including an improved orbital ephemeris. The transmission spectrum shows a strong absorption signature shortward of 0.55{\mu}m, with a strong blueward slope into the near-ultraviolet. We detect atmospheric sodium absorption at a 3.3{\sigma} significance level, but find no evidence for the potassium feature. The red data implies a marginally flat spectrum with a tentative absorption enhancement at wavelength longer than ~0.85{\mu}m. The STIS and WFC3 spectra differ significantly in absolute radius level (4.3 +/- 1.6 pressure scale heights), implying strong optical absorption in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b. The optical to near-infrared difference cannot be explained by stellar activity, as simulta- neous stellar activity monitoring of the G0V HAT-P-1b host star and its identical companion show no significant activity that could explain the result. We compare the complete STIS and WFC3 transmission spectrum with theoretical atmospheric mod- els which include haze, sodium and an extra optical absorber. We find that both an optical absorber and a super-solar sodium to water abundance ratio might be a sce- nario explaining the HAT-P-1b observations. Our results suggest that strong optical absorbers may be a dominant atmospheric feature in some hot Jupiter exoplanets.
  • We present HST optical transmission spectra of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b, taken with the STIS instrument. From the transmission spectra, we are able to decisively rule out prominent absorption by TiO in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Strong pressure-broadened Na and K absorption signatures are also excluded, as are significant metal-hydride features. We compare our combined broadband spectrum to a wide variety of existing aerosol-free atmospheric models, though none are satisfactory fits. However, we do find that the full transmission spectrum can be described by models which include significant opacity from aerosols: including Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering, tholin haze, and settling dust profiles. The transmission spectrum follows an effective extinction cross section with a power-law of index alpha, with the slope of the transmission spectrum constraining the quantity alphaT = -3528+/-660 K, where T is the atmospheric temperature. Rayleigh scattering (alpha=-4) is among the best fitting models, though requires low terminator temperatures near 900 K. Sub-micron size aerosol particles can provide equally good fits to the entire transmission spectrum for a wide range of temperatures, and we explore corundum as a plausible dust aerosol. The presence of atmospheric aerosols also helps to explain the modestly bright albedo implied by Spitzer observations, as well as the near black body nature of the emission spectrum. Ti-bearing condensates on the cooler night-side is the most natural explanation for the overall lack of TiO signatures in WASP-12b, indicating the day/night cold-trap is an important effect for very hot Jupiters. These finding indicate that aerosols can play a significant atmospheric role for the entire wide range of hot-Jupiter atmospheres, potentially affecting their overall spectrum and energy balance.(abridged)
  • We measure the transmission spectrum of WASP-19b from 3 transits using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The STIS spectra cover a wavelength range of 0.29-1.03 microns with resolving power R=500. The optical data are combined with archival near-IR data from the HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) G141 grism, covering the wavelength range 1.087-1.687 micron, with resolving power R=130. We obtain the transmission spectrum from 0.53-1.687 microns with S/N levels between 3000 and 11,000 in 0.1 micron bins. WASP-19 is a very active star, with optical stellar flux varying by a few per cent over time. We correct the transit light curves for the effects of stellar activity using ground-based activity monitoring with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). While we were not able to construct a transmission spectrum using the blue optical data due to the presence of large occulted star spots, we were able to use the spot crossings to help constrain the mean stellar spot temperature. To search for predicted features in the hot-Jupiter atmosphere, we also define spectral indices for differential radius measurements to specifically search for the presence of TiO and alkali line features. Our measurements rule out TiO features predicted for a planet of WASP-19b's equilibrium temperature (2050 K) in the transmission spectrum at the 2.7-2.9 sigma confidence level, depending on atmospheric model formalism. The WFC3 transmission spectrum shows strong absorption features due to the presence of H2O, which is detected at the 4 sigma confidence level between 1.1 and 1.4 microns. The results indicate that WASP-19b is a planet with no or low levels of TiO and without a high C/O ratio. The lack of observable TiO features are possibly due to rainout, breakdown from stellar activity or the presence of other absorbers in the optical.
  • We present two transits of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The time series observations were performed using long-slit spectroscopy of XO-2 and a nearby reference star with the OSIRIS instrument, enabling differential specrophotometric transit lightcurves capable of measuring the exoplanet's transmission spectrum. Two optical low-resolution grisms were used to cover the optical wavelength range from 3800 to 9300{\AA}. We find that sub-mmag level slit losses between the target and reference star prevent full optical transmission spectra from being constructed, limiting our analysis to differential absorption depths over ~1000{\AA} regions. Wider long slits or multi-object grism spectroscopy with wide masks will likely prove effective in minimising the observed slit-loss trends. During both transits, we detect significant absorption in the planetary atmosphere of XO-2b using a 50{\AA} bandpass centred on the Na I doublet, with absorption depths of Delta(R_pl/R_star)^2=0.049+/-0.017 % using the R500R grism and 0.047+/-0.011 % using the R500B grism (combined 5.2-sigma significance from both transits). The sodium feature is unresolved in our low-resolution spectra, with detailed modelling also likely ruling out significant line-wing absorption over an ~800{\AA} region surrounding the doublet. Combined with narrowband photometric measurements, XO-2b is the first hot Jupiter with evidence for both sodium and potassium present in the planet's atmosphere.
  • We present Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical transit narrow-band photometry of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the OSIRIS instrument. This unique instrument has the capabilities to deliver high cadence narrow-band photometric lightcurves, allowing us to probe the atmospheric composition of hot Jupiters from the ground. The observations were taken during three transit events which cover four wavelengths at spectral resolutions near 500, necessary for observing atmospheric features, and have near-photon limited sub-mmag precisions. Precision narrow-band photometry on a large aperture telescope allows for atmospheric transmission spectral features to be observed for exoplanets around much fainter stars than those of the well studied targets HD209458b and HD189733b, providing access to the majority of known transiting planets. For XO-2b, we measure planet-to-star radius contrasts of R_pl/R_star=0.10508+/-0.00052 at 6792 Ang, 0.10640+/-0.00058 at 7582 Ang, and 0.10686+/-0.00060 at 7664.9 Ang, and 0.10362+/-0.00051 at 8839 Ang. These measurements reveal significant spectral features at two wavelengths, with an absorption level of 0.067+/-0.016% at 7664.9 Ang due to atmospheric potassium in the line core (a 4.1-sigma significance level), and an absorption level of 0.058+/-0.016% at 7582 Ang, (a 3.6-sigma significance level). When comparing our measurements to hot-Jupiter atmospheric models, we find good agreement with models which are dominated in the optical by alkali metals. This is the first evidence for potassium in an extrasolar planet, an element that has long been theorized along with sodium to be a dominant source of opacity at optical wavelengths for hot Jupiters.
  • We observed three transits of the extrasolar planet HD189733b in HI Lyman-alpha and in a few other lines in the ultraviolet with HST/ACS, in the search for atmospheric signatures. We detect a transit signature in the Lyman-alpha light curve with a transit depth of 5.05 +/- 0.75 %. This depth exceeds the occultation depth produced by the planetary disk alone at the 3.5-sigma level (statistical). Other stellar emission lines are less bright, and, taken individually, they do not show the transit signature, while the whole spectra redward of the Lyman-alpha line has enough photons to show a transit signature consistent with the absorption by the planetary disk alone. The transit depth's upper limits in the emission lines are 11.1% for OI at 1305A and 5.5% for CII at 1335A. The presence of an extended exosphere of atomic hydrogen around HD189733b producing 5% absorption of the full unresolved Lyman-alpha line flux shows that the planet is losing gas. The Lyman-alpha light curve is well-fitted by a numerical simulation of escaping hydrogen in which the planetary atoms are pushed by the stellar radiation pressure. We constrain the escape rate of atomic hydrogen to be between 10^9 and 10^{11} g/s and the ionizing extreme UV flux between 2 and 40 times the solar value (1-sigma), with larger escape rates corresponding to larger EUV flux. The best fit is obtained for dM/dt=10^{10} g/s and an EUV flux F_{EUV}=20 times the solar value. HD189733b is the second extrasolar planet for which atmospheric evaporation has been detected.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared transit photometry of the nearby hot-Jupiter HD189733b. The observations were taken with the NICMOS instrument during five transits, with three transits executed with a narrowband filter at 1.87 microns and two performed with a narrowband filter at 1.66 microns. Our observing strategy using narrowband filters is insensitive to the usual HST intra-orbit and orbit-to-orbit measurement of systematic errors, allowing us to accurately and robustly measure the near-IR wavelength dependance of the planetary radius. Our measurements fail to reproduce the Swain et al. absorption signature of atmospheric water below 2 microns at a 5-sigma confidence level. We measure a planet-to-star radius contrast of 0.15498+/-0.00035 at 1.66 microns and a contrast of 0.15517+/-0.00019 at 1.87 microns. Both of our near-IR planetary radii values are in excellent agreement with the levels expected from Rayleigh scattering by sub-micron haze particles, observed at optical wavelengths, indicating that upper-atmospheric haze still dominates the near-IR transmission spectra over the absorption from gaseous molecular species at least below 2 microns.
  • Following re-analysis of Hubble Space Telescope observations of primary transits of the extrasolar planet HD209458b at Lyman-alpha, Ben-Jaffel (2007, BJ007) claims that no sign of evaporation is observed. Here we show that, in fact, this new analysis is consistent with the one of Vidal-Madjar et al. (2003, VM003) and supports the detection of evaporation. The apparent disagreement is mainly due to the disparate wavelength ranges that are used to derive the transit absorption depth. VM003 derives a (15+/-4)% absorption depth during transit over the core of the stellar Lyman-alpha line (from -130 km/s to +100 km/s), and this result agrees with the (8.9+/-2.1)% absorption depth reported by BJ007 from a slightly expanded dataset but over a larger wavelength range (+/-200 km/s). These measurements agree also with the (5+/-2)% absorption reported by Vidal-Madjar et al. (2004) over the whole Lyman-alpha line from independent, lower-resolution data. We show that stellar Lyman-alpha variability is unlikely to significantly affect those detections. The HI atoms must necessarily have velocities above the escape velocities and/or be outside the Roche lobe, given the lobe shape and orientation. Absorption by HI in HD209458b's atmosphere has thus been detected with different datasets, and now with independent analyses. All these results strengthen the concept of evaporating hot-Jupiters, as well as the modelization of this phenomenon.
  • We present an F606W-F814W color-magnitude diagram for the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images. The luminosity function is well-sampled to 3 magnitudes below the turn-off. We see no evidence for multiple turnoffs and conclude that, at least over the field of the view of the WFPC2, star formation was primarily single-epoch. If the observed number of blue stragglers is due to extended star formation, then roughly 6% (upper limit) of the stars could be half as old as the bulk of the galaxy. The color difference between the red giant branch and the turnoff is consistent with an old population and is very similar to that observed in the old, metal-poor Galactic globular clusters M68 and M92. Despite its red horizontal branch, Draco appears to be older than M68 and M92 by 1.6 +/- 2.5 Gyrs, lending support to the argument that the ``second parameter'' which governs horizontal branch morphology must be something other than age. Draco's observed luminosity function is very similar to that of M68, and the derived initial mass function is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood.