• In this work we experimentally demonstrate for the first time spontaneous generation of two-dimensional exciton-polariton X-waves. X-waves belong to the family of localized packets, which are capable of sustaining their shape with no spreading even in the linear regime. This allows to keep the packet shape and size for very low densities and very long times compared, for instance, to soliton waves, which always necessitate a nonlinearity to compensate the diffusion. Here we exploit the polariton nonlinearity and unique structured dispersion, comprising both positive- and negative-mass curvatures, to trigger an asymmetric four wave mixing in the momentum space. This ultimately enables self-formation of a spatial X-wave front. By means of ultrafast imaging experiments we observe the early reshaping of the initial Gaussian packet into the X-pulse and its propagation even for vanishing small densities. This allows us to outline the crucial effects and parameters driving the phenomena and to tune the degree of peak superluminal propagation, which we found to be in a good agreement with numerical simulations.
  • The Hanbury Brown--Twiss effect is one of the celebrated phenomenologies of modern physics that accommodates equally well classical (interferences of waves) and quantum (correlations between indistinguishable particles) interpretations. The effect was discovered in the late thirties with a basic observation of Hanbury Brown that radio-pulses from two distinct antennas generate signals on the oscilloscope that wiggle similarly to the naked eye. When Hanbury Brown and his mathematician colleague Twiss took the obvious step to propose bringing the effect in the optical range, they met with considerable opposition as single-photon interferences were deemed impossible. The Hanbury Brown--Twiss effect is nowadays universally accepted and, being so fundamental, embodies many subtleties of our understanding of the wave/particle dual nature of light. Thanks to a novel experimental technique, we report here a generalized version of the Hanbury Brown--Twiss effect to include the frequency of the detected light, or, from the particle point of view, the energy of the detected photons. In addition to the known tendencies of indistinguishable photons to arrive together on the detector, we find that photons of different colors present the opposite characteristic of avoiding each others. We postulate that fermions can be similarly brought to exhibit positive (boson-like) correlations by frequency filtering.
  • A collection of more than 1800 carbonized Greek and Latin papyri, discovered in the Roman Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum in the middle of 18th century, is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These ancient-Herculaneum-papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains valuable work by Greek philosophers, such as Epicurus, Chrysippus and Philodemus, in particular an impressive amount of extensive treatises by Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean philosopher of the 1st century BC. The aim of the present study is to read extended and hitherto unknown portions of text hidden inside carbonized-Herculaneum-papyri using enhanced X-ray-phase-contrast-tomography (XPCT) non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for virtual-unrolling. This paper documents our success in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of texts have been decoded and the 'voice' of Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from rolled-up carbonized Herculaneum-papyri.
  • Spinorial or multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates may sustain fractional quanta of circulation, vorticant topological excitations with half integer windings of phase and polarization. Matter-light quantum fluids, such as microcavity polaritons, represent a unique test bed for realising strongly interacting and out-of-equilibrium condensates. The direct access to the phase of their wavefunction enables us to pursue the quest of whether half vortices ---rather than full integer vortices--- are the fundamental topological excitations of a spinor polariton fluid. Here, we are able to directly generate by resonant pulsed excitations, a polariton fluid carrying either the half or full vortex states as initial condition, and to follow their coherent evolution using ultrafast holography. Surprisingly we observe a rich phenomenology that shows a stable evolution of a phase singularity in a single component as well as in the full vortex state, spiraling, splitting and branching of the initial cores under different regimes and the proliferation of many vortex anti-vortex pairs in self generated circular ripples. This allows us to devise the interplay of nonlinearity and sample disorder in shaping the fluid and driving the phase singularities dynamics
  • Polaritons in microcavities are versatile quasi-2D bosonic particles with a high degree of coherence and strong nonlinearities, thanks to their hybrid light-matter character. In their condensed form, they display striking quantum hydrodynamic features analogous to atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, such as long-range order coherence, superfluidity and quantized vorticity. Their variegated dispersive and dissipative properties, however, set significant differences from their atomic counterpart. In this work, we report the unique phenomenology that is observed when a pulse of light impacts the polariton vacuum: the condensate that is instantaneously formed does not splash in real space but instead coheres into an enigmatic structure, featuring concentric rings and, most notably, a sharp and bright peak at the center. Using a state-of-the-art ultrafast imaging with 50 fs time steps, we are able to track the dynamics of the polariton mean-field wavefunction in both real and reciprocal space. The observation of the real-space collapse of the condensate into an extremely localized---resolution limited---peak is at odd with the repulsive interactions of polaritons and their positive effective mass. An unconventional mechanism is therefore at play to account for our observations. Our modeling suggests that self-trapping due to a local heating of the crystal lattice---that can be described as a collective polaron formed by a polariton condensate---could be involved. These observations hint at the fascinating fluid dynamics of polaritons in conditions of extreme intensities and ultrafast times.
  • Superfluidity, the ability of a liquid or gas to flow with zero viscosity, is one of the most remarkable implications of collective quantum coherence. In equilibrium systems like liquid 4He and ultracold atomic gases, superfluid behaviour conjugates diverse yet related phenomena, such as persistency of metastable flow in multiply connected geometries and the existence of a critical velocity for frictionless flow when hitting a static defect. The link between these different aspects of superfluid behaviour is far less clear in driven-dissipative systems displaying collective coherence, such as microcavity polaritons, which raises important questions about their concurrency. With a joint theoretical and experimental study, we show that the scenario is particularly rich for polaritons driven in a three-fluid collective coherent regime so-called optical parametric oscillator. On the one hand, the spontaneous macroscopic coherence following the phase locking of the signal and idler fluids has been shown to be responsible for their simultaneous quantized flow metastability. On the other hand, we show here that pump, signal and idler have distinct responses when hitting a static defect; while the signal displays hardly appreciable modulations, the ones appearing in pump and idler are determined by their mutual coupling due to nonlinear and parametric processes.
  • Spin-glass theory is one of the leading paradigms of complex physics and describes condensed matter, neural networks and biological systems, ultracold atoms, random photonics, and many other research fields. According to this theory, identical systems under identical conditions may reach different states and provide different values for observable quantities. This effect is known as Replica Symmetry Breaking and is revealed by the shape of the probability distribution function of an order parameter named the Parisi overlap. However, a direct experimental evidence in any field of research is still missing. Here we investigate pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in random lasers, we introduce and measure the analogue of the Parisi overlap in independent experimental realizations of the same disordered sample, and we find that the distribution function yields evidence of a transition to a glassy light phase compatible with a replica symmetry breaking.
  • We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally a generation of light pulses whose polarization varies temporally to cover selected areas of the Poincar\'e sphere with tunable swirling speed and total duration (1 ps and 10 ps respectively in our implementation). The effect relies on the Rabi oscillations of two polarized fields in the strong coupling regime, excited by two counter-polarized and delayed pulses. The interferences of the oscillating fields result in the precession of the Stokes vector of the emitted light while polariton lifetime imbalance results in its drift from a circle on the sphere of controllable radius to a single point at long times. The positioning of the initial and final states allows to engineer the type of polarization spanning, including a full sweeping of the Poincar\'e sphere. The universality and simplicity of the scheme should allow for the deployment of time varying polarization fields at a technologically exploitable level.
  • We report the experimental observation and control of space and time-resolved light-matter Rabi oscillations in a microcavity. Our setup precision and the system coherence are so high that coherent control can be implemented with amplification or switching off of the oscillations and even erasing of the polariton density by optical pulses. The data is reproduced by a fundamental quantum optical model with excellent accuracy, providing new insights on the key components that rule the polariton dynamics.
  • We report on a novel kind of transition in random lasers induced by the geometrical confinement of the emitting material. Different dye doped paper devices with controlled geometry are fabricated by soft-lithography and show two distinguished behaviors in the stimulated emission: in the absence of boundary constraints the energy threshold decreases for larger laser volumes showing the typical trend of diffusive {\it non-resonant} random lasers, while when the same material in lithographed into channels, the walls act as cavity and the {\it resonant} behavior typical of standard lasers is observed. The experimental results are consistent with the general theories of random and standard lasers and a clear phase diagram of the transition is reported.
  • We investigate the cross-interactions in a two-component polariton quantum fluid coherently driven by two independent pumping lasers tuned at different energies and momenta. We show that both the hysteresis cycles and the ON/OFF threshold of one polariton signal can be entirely controlled by a second polariton fluid. Furthermore, we study the ultrafast switching dynamics of a driven polariton state, demonstrating the ability to control the polariton population with an external laser pulse, in less than a few picoseconds.
  • The random laser emission from the functionalized thienyl-S,S-dioxide quinquethiophene (T5OCx) in confined patterns with different shapes is demonstrated. Functional patterning of the light emitter organic material in well defined features is obtained by spontaneous molecular self-assembly guided by surface tension driven (STD) lithography. Such controlled supramolecular nano-aggregates act as scattering centers allowing the fabrication of one-component organic lasers with no external resonator and with desired shape and efficiency. Atomic force microscopy shows that different geometric pattern with different supramolecular organization obtained by the lithographic process tailors the coherent emission properties by controlling the distribution and the size of the random scatterers.
  • While photons in vacuum are massless particles that do not interact with each other, significant photon-photon interactions appear in suitable nonlinear media, leading to novel hydrodynamic behaviors typical of quantum fluids. Here we show the formation of vortex-antivortex pairs in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton-polaritons -a coherent gas of strongly dressed photons- flowing at supersonic speed against an artificial potential barrier created and controlled by a light beam in a planar semiconductor microcavity. The observed hydrodynamical phenomenology is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, recently generalized to the polariton context. However, in contrast to this theoretical work, we show how the initial position and the subsequent trajectory of the vortices crucially depend on the strength and size of the artificial barrier. Additionally, we demonstrate how a suitably tailored optical beam can be used to permanently trap and store the vortices that are hydrodynamically created in the wake of a natural defect. These observations are borne out by time-dependent theoretical simulations.