• We present the analysis of four first overtone RR Lyrae stars observed with the Kepler space telescope, based on data obtained over nearly 2.5yr. All four stars are found to be multiperiodic. The strongest secondary mode with frequency f_2 has an amplitude of a few mmag, 20 - 45 times lower than the main radial mode with frequency f_1. The two oscillations have a period ratio of P_2/P_1 = 0.612 - 0.632 that cannot be reproduced by any two radial modes. Thus, the secondary mode is nonradial. Modes yielding similar period ratios have also recently been discovered in other variables of the RRc and RRd types. These objects form a homogenous group and constitute a new class of multimode RR Lyrae pulsators, analogous to a similar class of multimode classical Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds. Because a secondary mode with P_2/P_1 ~ 0.61 is found in almost every RRc and RRd star observed from space, this form of multiperiodicity must be common. In all four Kepler RRc stars studied, we find subharmonics of f_2 at ~1/2 f_2 and at ~3/2 f_2. This is a signature of period doubling of the secondary oscillation, and is the first detection of period doubling in RRc stars. The amplitudes and phases of f_2 and its subharmonics are variable on a timescale of 10 - 200d. The dominant radial mode also shows variations on the same timescale, but with much smaller amplitude. In three Kepler RRc stars we detect additional periodicities, with amplitudes below 1mmag, that must correspond to nonradial g-modes. Such modes never before have been observed in RR Lyrae variables.
  • We present results of a BVI variability survey in the young open cluster NGC 457 based on observations obtained during three separate runs spanning almost 20 years. In total, we found 79 variable stars, of which 66 are new. The BVI photometry was transformed to the standard system and used to derive cluster parameters by means of isochrone fitting. Using the complementary H-alpha photometry carried out in two seasons separated by over 10 years, we find that the cluster is very rich in Be stars. In total, 15 stars in the observed field of which 14 are cluster members showed H-alpha in emission either during our observations or in the past. Most of the Be stars vary in brightness on different time scales including short-period variability related most likely to g-mode pulsations. A single-epoch spectrum of NGC457-6 shows that this Be star is presently in the shell phase. The inventory of variable stars in the observed field consists of a single BCep-type star, NGC457-8, 13 Be stars, 21 slowly pulsating B stars, seven DSct stars, one GDor star, 16 unclassified periodic stars, 8 eclipsing systems and a dozen of stars with irregular variability, of which six are also B-type stars. As many as 45 variable stars are of spectral type B which is the largest number in all open clusters presented in this series of papers. The most interesting is the discovery of a large group of slowly pulsating B stars which occupy the cluster main sequence in the range between V=11 and 14.5 mag, corresponding to spectral types B3 to B8. They all have very low amplitudes and about half show pulsations with frequencies higher than 3 c/d. We argue that these are most likely fast-rotating slowly pulsating B stars, observed also in other open clusters.
  • Detached eclipsing binaries (dEBs) are ideal targets for accurate measurement of masses and radii of ther component stars. If at least one of the stars has evolved off the main sequence (MS), the masses and radii give a strict constraint on the age of the stars. Several dEBs containing a bright K giant and a fainter MS star have been discovered by the Kepler satellite. The mass and radius of a red giant (RG) star can also be derived from its asteroseismic signal. The parameters determined in this way depend on stellar models and may contain systematic errors. It is important to validate the asteroseismically determined mass and radius with independent methods. This can be done when stars are members of stellar clusters or members of dEBs. KIC 8410637 consists of an RG and an MS star. The aim is to derive accurate masses and radii for both components and provide the foundation for a strong test of the asteroseismic method and the accuracy of the deduced mass, radius and age. We analyse high-resolution spectra from three different spectrographs. We also calculate a fit to the Kepler light curve and use ground-based photometry to determine the flux ratios between the component stars in the BVRI passbands. We measured the masses and radii of the stars in the dEB, and the classical parameters Teff, log g and [Fe/H] from the spectra and ground-based photometry. The RG component of KIC 8410637 is most likely in the core helium-burning red clump phase of evolution and has an age and composition very similar to the stars in the open cluster NGC 6819. The mass of the RG in KIC 8410637 should therefore be similar to the mass of RGs in NGC 6819, thus lending support to the most up-to-date version of the asteroseismic scaling relations. This is the first direct measurement of both mass and radius for an RG to be compared with values for RGs from asteroseismic scaling relations.
  • We summarize our ground-based program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of the asteroseismic targets of the Kepler space telescope. We have already determined atmospheric parameters, projected velocity of rotation, and radial velocity of 62 Kepler asteroseismic targets and 33 other stars in the Kepler field of view. We discovered six single-lined and two double-lined spectroscopic binaries, we determined the interstellar reddening for 29 stars in the Kepler field of view, and discovered three delta Sct, two gamma Dor and 14 other variable stars in the field of NGC 6866.
  • We present results of a search for variable stars in the intermediate-age open cluster NGC 7044. We found 23 variable stars in the observed field. One star turned out to be of the delta Sct type with two pulsational modes excited. From the position in the color-magnitude diagram we conclude that this star is a member of the cluster. Moreover, we found 13 eclipsing systems, of which five are W UMa stars, one is a beta Lyr variable, six are beta Per binaries showing detached configuration, and the last one is another probable beta Per system. Using the period-luminosity-color relation for W UMa stars we established the membership of the contact binaries, finding four of them to be very probable cluster members. We estimated from these four stars an apparent distance modulus (m-M)_V of NGC 7044 to be 14.2 +/- 0.4 mag, which is smaller than previous determinations of this parameter. We were able to derive orbital period for only four beta Per systems. For the remaining ones we observed only two or three eclipses. Finally, nine stars we found to show irregular light changes. Most of them are red stars not belonging to the cluster. For the cluster core we determined a reddening map, which allowed us to construct a dereddened color-magnitude diagram of NGC 7044 with a narrow main-sequence. By fitting a theoretical isochrone to this diagram we derived E(V-I_C) = 0.92 mag, (m-M)_V = 14.45 mag and log(age/yr) = 9.2.
  • We present preliminary results of the photometric variability search in the field of view of the young open cluster NGC 457. We find over 60 variable stars in the field, including 25 pulsating or candidate pulsating stars.
  • Two observational campaigns were carried out during the eclipses of EE Cep in 2003 and 2008/9 to verify whether the eclipsing body in the system is indeed a dark disk and to understand the observed changes in the depth and durations of the eclipses. Multicolour photometric data and spectroscopic observations at both low and high resolution were collected. We numerically modelled the variations in brightness and colour during the eclipses. We tested models with different disk structure. We considered the possibility of disk precession. The complete set of observational data collected during the last three eclipses are made available to the astronomical community. Two blue maxima in the colour indices were detected during these two eclipses, one before and one after the photometric minimum. The first (stronger) blue maximum is simultaneous with a "bump" that is very clear in all the UBVRI light curves. Variations in the spectral line profiles seem to be recurrent during each cycle. NaI lines always show at least three absorption components during the eclipse minimum and strong absorption is superimposed on the H_alpha emission. These observations confirm that the eclipsing object in EE Cep system is indeed a dark, dusty disk around a low luminosity object. The primary appears to be a rapidly rotating Be star that is strongly darkened at the equator and brightened at the poles. Some of the conclusions of this work require verification in future studies: (i) a complex, possibly multi-ring structure of the disk in EE Cep; (ii) our explanation of the "bump" observed during the last two eclipses in terms of the different times of obscuration of the hot polar regions of the Be star by the disk; and (iii) our suggested period of the disk precession (~11-12 P_orb) and predicted depth of about 2 mag the forthcoming eclipse in 2014.
  • We analyzed the Long Cadence photometry of 4 first overtone RR Lyr-type stars (RRc stars) observed by the KEPLER telescope. All studied variables are multiperiodic. The strongest secondary peak appears for f_2/f_1 = 1.58-1.63, or P_2/P_1 = 0.61-0.63. In each star we detect at least one subharmonic of f_2, either at ~1/2 f_2 or at ~3/2 f_2. The presence of subharmonics is a characteristic signature of a period doubling.
  • We present results of a CCD variability search in the field of the young open cluster NGC 6834. We discover 15 stars to be variable in light. The brightest, a multiperiodic Gamma Doradus-type variable is a foreground star. The eight fainter ones, including a Gamma Cassiopeiae-type variable, two Lambda Eridani-type variables, an ellipsoidal variable, an EB-type eclipsing binary, and three variable stars we could not classify, all have E(B-V) within proper range, thus fulfilling the necessary condition to be members. One of the three unclassified variables may be a non-member on account of its large angular distance from the center of the cluster. Four of the six faintest variable stars, which include two eclipsing binaries and two very red stars showing year-to-year variations, are certain non-members. One of the remaining two faintest variable stars, an EA-type eclipsing binary may be a member, while the faintest one, a W Ursae Majoris-type variable, is probably a non-member. For 6937 stars we provide the V magnitudes and (V-I)_C color indices on the standard system. Because of nonuniform reddening over the cluster's face, a direct comparison of these data with theoretical isochrones is not possible. We therefore obtain E(B-V) from available UBV photometry, determine the lower and upper bound of E(B-V) for NGC 6834, and then fit properly reddened Padova isochrones to the data. Assuming HDE 332843, an early-F supergiant, to be a member we get log (age/yr) = 7.70, V_0 - M_V = 12.10 mag. For 103 brightest stars in our field we obtained the alpha index, a measure of the equivalent widths of the Halpha line. We find Halpha emission in five stars, including the Gamma Cas-type variable and the two Lambda Eri-type variables.
  • We present our analysis of the long cadence Kepler data for the well-studied Blazhko star RR Lyr, gathered during the first two quarters of the satellite's observations and covering a total of 127d. Besides being of great importance for our understanding of RR Lyrae stars in general, these RR Lyr data can be regarded as a case study for observations of bright stars with Kepler. Kepler can perform high-precision photometry on targets like RR Lyr, as the saturated flux is conserved to a very high degree. The Kepler data on RR Lyr are revolutionary in several respects. Even with long-cadence sampling (one measurement per 29.4 min), the unprecedented precision (< mmag) of the Kepler photometry allows the study of the star's extreme light curve variations in detail. The multiplet structures at the main frequency and its harmonics, typical for Blazhko stars, are clearly detected up to the quintuplets. For the first time, photometric data of RR Lyr reveal the presence of half-integer frequencies, linked to a period doubling effect. This phenomenon may be connected to the still unexplained Blazhko modulation. Moreover, with three observed Blazhko cycles at our disposal, we observe that there is no exact repetition in the light curve changes from one modulation cycle to the next for RR Lyr. This may be due to additional periodicities in the star, or to transient or quasi-periodic changes.
  • We present our analysis of Kepler observations of 29 RR Lyrae stars, based on 138-d of observation. We report precise pulsation periods for all stars. Nine of these stars had incorrect or unknown periods in the literature. Fourteen of the stars exhibit both amplitude and phase Blazhko modulations, with Blazhko periods ranging from 27.7 to more than 200 days. For V445 Lyr, a longer secondary variation is also observed in addition to its 53.2-d Blazhko period. The unprecedented precision of the Kepler photometry has led to the discovery of the the smallest modulations detected so far. Moreover, additional frequencies beyond the well-known harmonics and Blazhko multiplets have been found. These frequencies are located around the half-integer multiples of the main pulsation frequency for at least three stars. In four stars, these frequencies are close to the first and/or second overtone modes. The amplitudes of these periodicities seem to vary over the Blazhko cycle. V350 Lyr, a non-Blazhko star in our sample, is the first example of a double mode RR Lyrae star that pulsates in its fundamental and second overtone modes.
  • We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 36 different instruments at 31 telescopes on 23 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Mt Wilson, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observatoire de Haute Provence, and Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman at Calar Alto. Based on data from the AAVSO International Database.)
  • CONTEXT: Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field beta Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. AIMS: To improve our comprehension of the beta Cep stars, we studied the young open cluster NGC 884 to discover new B-type pulsators, besides the two known beta Cep stars, and other variable stars. METHODS: An extensive multi-site campaign was set up to gather accurate CCD photometry time series in four filters (U, B, V, I) of a field of NGC884. Fifteen different instruments collected almost 77500 CCD images in 1286 hours. The images were calibrated and reduced to transform the CCD frames into interpretable differential light curves. Various variability indicators and frequency analyses were applied to detect variable stars in the field. Absolute photometry was taken to deduce some general cluster and stellar properties. RESULTS: We achieved an accuracy for the brightest stars of 5.7 mmag in V, 6.9 mmag in B, 5.0 mmag in I and 5.3 mmag in U. The noise level in the amplitude spectra is 50 micromag in the V band. Our campaign confirms the previously known pulsators, and we report more than one hundred new multi- and mono-periodic B-, A- and F-type stars. Their interpretation in terms of classical instability domains is not straightforward, pointing to imperfections in theoretical instability computations. In addition, we have discovered six new eclipsing binaries and four candidates as well as other irregular variable stars in the observed field.
  • We present the first results of our analyses of selected RR Lyrae stars for which data have been obtained by the Kepler Mission. As expected, we find a significant fraction of the RRab stars to show the Blazhko effect, a still unexplained phenomenon that manifests itself as periodic amplitude and phase modulations of the light curve, on time scales of typically tens to hundreds of days. The long time span of the Kepler Mission of 3.5 yrs, and the unprecedentedly high precision of its data provide a unique opportunity for the study of RR Lyrae stars. Using data of a modulated star observed in the first roll as a showcase, we discuss the data, our analyses, findings, and their implications for our understanding of RR Lyrae stars and the Blazhko effect. With at least 40% of the RR Lyrae stars in our sample showing modulation, we confirm the high incidence rate that was only found in recent high-precision studies. Moreover, we report the occurrence of additional frequencies, beyond the main pulsation mode and its modulation components. Their half-integer ratio to the main frequency is reminiscent of a period doubling effect caused by resonances, observed for the first time in RR Lyrae stars.
  • The photometric and spectroscopic observational campaign organized for the 2008/9 eclipse of EE Cep revealed features, which indicate that the eclipsing disk in the EE Cep system has a multi-ring structure. We suggest that the gaps in the disk can be related to the possible planet formation.
  • We report the discovery of 19 variable stars and two blue-stragglers in the field of the open cluster NGC6866. Three of the variable stars we classify as delta Sct, two, as gamma Dor, four, as WUMa, two, as ellipsoidal variables, and one, as an eclipsing binary. Seven stars show irregular variability. Two of the pulsators, a delta Sct star NGC 6866-29 and a gamma Dor star NGC6866-21, are multiperiodic. From an analysis of proper motions, we conclude that the delta Sct stars, one of the gamma Dor stars and both blue-stragglers are very probable members of the cluster. The position on the color-magnitude diagram of seven other variables suggests that they also belong to the cluster. The eclipsing binary, which we discover to be a new high-velocity star, and the seven irregular variables are non-members. Then, we discuss in detail the age and metallicity of open clusters that host gamma Dor stars and we show that none of these parameters is correlated with the number of gamma Dor stars in cluster.
  • To expand the range in the colour-magnitude diagram where asteroseismology can be applied, we organized a photometry campaign to find evidence for solar-like oscillations in giant stars in the globular cluster M4. The aim was to detect the comb-like p-mode structure characteristic for solar-like oscillations in the amplitude spectra. The two dozen main target stars are in the region of the bump stars and have luminosities in the range 50-140 Lsun. We collected 6160 CCD frames and light curves for about 14000 stars were extracted. We obtain high quality light curves for the K giants, but no clear oscillation signal is detected. High precision differential photometry is possible even in very crowded regions like the core of M4. Solar-like oscillations are probably present in K giants, but the amplitudes are lower than classical scaling laws predict.
  • As a result of the reanalysis of the OGLE-I observations by means of the image subtraction method, we present the first part of a catalog, consisting of the data for variable stars in four Galactic fields observed by the OGLE-I, viz. MM1-A, MM1-B, MM7-A, and MM7-B. In total, 2016 variable stars have been found. This increased the number of known variable in these fields stars more than twofold. We comment on the detectability of the variable stars in previous studies. Some interesting findings are also discussed. Among others, we found 45 Delta Scuti stars (38 are new) including several multiperiodic objects. Detailed analysis of the light curves of 47 RR Lyrae stars (24 are new detections) allowed us to find five stars which exhibit nonradial pulsations and one RRd star. Three RRab stars are members of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph). We also find four objects which are probably galactic RV Tauri stars and one W Virginis star which seems to belong to Sgr dSph. This is the first Population II Cepheid found in this satellite galaxy and dSph other than the Fornax one. For eclipsing EW-type binaries, which are the most abundant variables in our catalog, we investigate the amplitude and period distributions. A comparison with the previous OGLE-I catalogs indicates that we found more stars with smaller amplitudes. Finally, in addition to the two microlensing events discovered previously in these fields, we find five more.
  • Results of a search for variable stars in the central region of the globular cluster M13 are presented. Prior to this study, 36 variable and suspected variable stars were known in this cluster (Osborn 2000; Clement et al. 2001). Of these stars, five were not observed by us. We find v3, v4, v10, v12, and v13 to be constant in light. Surprisingly, only two out of the ten variable star candidates of Kadla et al. (1980) appear to be variable. Both are RRc variables. Additionally, three RR Lyrae stars and one SX Phoenicis variable are discovered. Three close frequencies are detected for an RRc star v36. It appears that this variable is another multi-periodic RR Lyrae star pulsating in non-radial modes. Light curves of the three known BL Herculis stars and all known RR Lyrae stars are presented. The total number of known RR Lyrae stars in M13 is now nine. Only one is an RRab star. The mean period of RRc variables amounts to 0.36 +/- 0.05 d, suggesting that M13 should be included in the group of Oosterhoff type II globular clusters. Mean V magnitudes and ranges of variation are derived for seven RR Lyrae and three BL Herculis variables. Almost all observed bright giants show some degree of variability. In particular, we confirm the variability of two red giants announced to be variable by Osborn (2000) and in addition find five new cases.