• We analyse cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters to study the X-ray scaling relations between total masses and observable quantities such as X-ray luminosity, gas mass, X-ray temperature, and $Y_{X}$. Three sets of simulations are performed with an improved version of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics GADGET-3 code. These consider the following: non-radiative gas, star formation and stellar feedback, and the addition of feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGN). We select clusters with $M_{500} > 10^{14} M_{\odot} E(z)^{-1}$, mimicking the typical selection of Sunyaev-Zeldovich samples. This permits to have a mass range large enough to enable robust fitting of the relations even at $z \sim 2$. The results of the analysis show a general agreement with observations. The values of the slope of the mass-gas mass and mass-temperature relations at $z=2$ are 10 per cent lower with respect to $z=0$ due to the applied mass selection, in the former case, and to the effect of early merger in the latter. We investigate the impact of the slope variation on the study of the evolution of the normalization. We conclude that cosmological studies through scaling relations should be limited to the redshift range $z=0-1$, where we find that the slope, the scatter, and the covariance matrix of the relations are stable. The scaling between mass and $Y_X$ is confirmed to be the most robust relation, being almost independent of the gas physics. At higher redshifts, the scaling relations are sensitive to the inclusion of AGNs which influences low-mass systems. The detailed study of these objects will be crucial to evaluate the AGN effect on the ICM.
  • A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • We analyze the radial pressure profiles, the ICM clumping factor and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) scaling relations of a sample of simulated galaxy clusters and groups identified in a set of hydrodynamical simulations based on an updated version of the TreePM-SPH GADGET-3 code. Three different sets of simulations are performed: the first assumes non-radiative physics, the others include, among other processes, AGN and/or stellar feedback. Our results are analyzed as a function of redshift, ICM physics, cluster mass and cluster cool-coreness or dynamical state. In general, the mean pressure profiles obtained for our sample of groups and clusters show a good agreement with X-ray and SZ observations. Simulated cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters also show a good match with real data. We obtain in all cases a small (if any) redshift evolution of the pressure profiles of massive clusters, at least back to z=1. We find that the clumpiness of gas density and pressure increases with the distance from the cluster center and with the dynamical activity. The inclusion of AGN feedback in our simulations generates values for the gas clumping ($\sqrt C_{\rho}\sim 1.2$ at $R_{200}$) in good agreement with recent observational estimates. The simulated $Y_{SZ}-M$ scaling relations are in good accordance with several observed samples, especially for massive clusters. As for the scatter of these relations, we obtain a clear dependence on the cluster dynamical state, whereas this distinction is not so evident when looking at the subsamples of CC and NCC clusters.
  • We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and AGN feedback and are based on an improved version of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, the primary diagnostic we used to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and on the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of cool-core systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of non-cool-core systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of objects, we find that they occur in similar proportions in both simulations and in observations. Furthermore, we also find that simulated cool-core clusters have profiles of iron abundance that are steeper than those of NCC clusters, which is also in agreement with observational results. We show that the capability of our simulations to generate a realistic cool-core structure in the cluster population is due to AGN feedback and artificial thermal diffusion: their combined action allows us to naturally distribute the energy extracted from super-massive black holes and to compensate for the radiative losses of low-entropy gas with short cooling time residing in the cluster core.
  • We present a backward approach for the interpretation of the evolution of the near-infrared and the far-infrared luminosity functions across the redshift range 0<z<3. In our method, late-type galaxies are treated by means of a parametric phenomenological method based on PEP/HerMES data up to z~4, whereas spheroids are described by means of a physically motivated backward model. The spectral evolution of spheroids is modelled by means of a single-mass model, associated to a present-day elliptical with K-band luminosity comparable to the break of the local early-type luminosity function. The formation of proto-spheroids is assumed to occurr across the redshift range 1< z < 5. The key parameter is represented by the redshift z_0.5 at which half proto-spheroids are already formed. A statistical study indicates for this parameter values between z_0.5=1.5 and z_0.5=3. We assume as fiducial value z_0.5~2, and show that this assumption allows us to describe accourately the redshift distributions and the source counts. By assuming z_0.5 ~ 2 at the far-IR flux limit of the PEP-COSMOS survey, the PEP-selected sources observed at z>2 can be explained as progenitors of local spheroids caught during their formation. We also test the effects of mass downsizing by dividing the spheroids into three populations of different present-day stellar masses. The results obtained in this case confirm the validity of our approach, i.e. that the bulk of proto-spheroids can be modelled by means of a single model which describes the evolution of galaxies at the break of the present-day early type K-band LF.
  • We introduce a new model for the spectral energy distribution of galaxies, GRASIL-3D, which includes a careful modelling of the dust component of the interstellar medium. GRASIL-3D is an entirely new model based on the formalism of an existing and widely applied spectrophotometric model, GRASIL, but specifically designed to be interfaced with galaxies with any arbitrarily given geometry, such as galaxies calculated by theoretical hydrodynamical galaxy formation codes. GRASIL-3D is designed to separately treat radiative transfer in molecular clouds and in the diffuse cirrus component. The code has a general applicability to the outputs of simulated galaxies, either from Lagrangian or Eulerian hydrodynamic codes. As an application, the new model has been interfaced to the P-DEVA and GASOLINE smoothed-particle hydrodynamic codes, and has been used to calculate the spectral energy distribution for a variety of simulated galaxies from UV to sub-millimeter wavelengths, whose comparison with observational data gives encouraging results. In addition, GRASIL-3D allows 2D images of such galaxies to be obtained, at several angles and in different bands.
  • We empirically test the relation between the SFR(LIR) derived from the infrared luminosity, LIR, and the SFR(Ha) derived from the Ha emission line luminosity using simple conversion relations. We use a sample of 474 galaxies at z = 0.06 - 0.46 with both Ha detection (from 20k zCOSMOS survey) and new far-IR Herschel data (100 and 160 {\mu}m). We derive SFR(Ha) from the Ha extinction corrected emission line luminosity. We find a very clear trend between E(B - V) and LIR that allows to estimate extinction values for each galaxy even if the Ha emission line measurement is not reliable. We calculate the LIR by integrating from 8 up to 1000 {\mu}m the SED that is best fitting our data. We compare SFR(Ha) with the SFR(LIR). We find a very good agreement between the two SFR estimates, with a slope of m = 1.01 \pm 0.03 in the SFR(LIR) vs SFR(Ha) diagram, a normalization constant of a = -0.08 \pm 0.03 and a dispersion of sigma = 0.28 dex.We study the effect of some intrinsic properties of the galaxies in the SFR(LIR)-SFR(Ha) relation, such as the redshift, the mass, the SSFR or the metallicity. The metallicity is the parameter that affects most the SFR comparison. The mean ratio of the two SFR estimators log[SFR(LIR)/SFR(Ha)] varies by approx. 0.6 dex from metal-poor to metal-rich galaxies (8.1 < log(O/H) + 12 < 9.2). This effect is consistent with the prediction of a theoretical model for the dust evolution in spiral galaxies. Considering different morphological types, we find a very good agreement between the two SFR indicators for the Sa, Sb and Sc morphologically classified galaxies, both in slope and normalization. For the Sd, irregular sample (Sd/Irr), the formal best-fit slope becomes much steeper (m = 1.62 \pm 0.43), but it is still consistent with 1 at the 1.5 sigma level, because of the reduced statistics of this sub-sample.
  • We present the analysis of Spitzer-IRS spectra of four early-type galaxies, NGC 1297, NGC 5044, NGC 6868, and NGC 7079, all classified as LINERs in the optical bands. Their IRS spectra present the full series of H2 rotational emission lines in the range 5--38 microns, atomic lines, and prominent PAH features. We investigate the nature and origin of the PAH emission, characterized by unusually low 6 -- 9/11.3 microns inter-band ratios. After the subtraction of a passive early type galaxy template, we find that the 7 -- 9 microns spectral region requires dust features not normally present in star forming galaxies. Each spectrum is then analyzed with the aim of identifying their components and origin. In contrast to normal star forming galaxies, where cationic PAH emission prevails, our 6--14 microns spectra seem to be dominated by large and neutral PAH emission, responsible for the low 6 -- 9/11.3 microns ratios, plus two broad dust emission features peaking at 8.2 microns and 12 microns. Theses broad components, observed until now mainly in evolved carbon stars and usually attributed to pristine material, contribute approximately 30-50% of the total PAH flux in the 6--14 microns region. We propose that the PAH molecules in our ETGs arise from fresh carbonaceous material which is continuously released by a population of carbon stars, formed in a rejuvenation episode which occurred within the last few Gyr. The analysis of the MIR spectra allows us to infer that, in order to maintain the peculiar size and charge distributions biased to large and neutral PAHs, this material must be shocked, and excited by the weak UV interstellar radiation field of our ETG.
  • We use deep observations taken with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), on board the Herschel satellite as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) guaranteed project along with submm ground-based observations to measure the dust mass of a sample of high-z submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We investigate their dust content relative to their stellar and gas masses, and compare them with local star-forming galaxies. High-z SMGs are dust rich, i.e. they have higher dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to local spiral galaxies (by a factor of 30) and also compared to local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, by a factor of 6). This indicates that the large masses of gas typically hosted in SMGs have already been highly enriched with metals and dust. Indeed, for those SMGs whose gas mass is measured, we infer dust-to-gas ratios similar or higher than local spirals and ULIRGs. However, similarly to other strongly star-forming galaxies in the local Universe and at high-z, SMGs are characterized by gas metalicities lower (by a factor of a few) than local spirals, as inferred from their optical nebular lines, which are generally ascribed to infall of metal-poor gas. This is in contrast with the large dust content inferred from the far-IR and submm data. In short, the metalicity inferred from the dust mass is much higher (by more than an order of magnitude) than that inferred from the optical nebular lines. We discuss the possible explanations of this discrepancy and the possible implications for the investigation of the metalicity evolution at high-z.
  • We study in detail the mid-infrared Spitzer-IRS spectrum of M 87 in the range 5 to 20 micron. Thanks to the high sensitivity of our Spitzer-IRS spectra we can disentangle the stellar and nuclear components of this active galaxy. To this end we have properly subtracted from the M 87 spectrum, the contribution of the underlying stellar continuum, derived from passive Virgo galaxies in our sample. The residual is a clear power-law, without any additional thermal component, with a zero point consistent with that obtained by high spatial resolution, ground based observations. The residual is independent of the adopted passive template. This indicates that the 10 micron silicate emission shown in spectra of M 87 can be entirely accounted for by the underlying old stellar population, leaving little room for a possible torus contribution. The MIR power-law has a slope alpha ~ 0.77-0.82 (S$_\nu\propto\nu^{-\alpha}$), consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission.
  • As a constraint for new starburst/AGN models of IRAS bright galaxies we determine the radio spectra of 31 luminous and ultraluminous IRAS galaxies (LIRGs/ULIRGs). We construct the radio spectra using both new and archival data. From our sample of radio spectra we find that very few have a straight power-law slope. Although some sources show a flattening of the radio spectral slope at high frequencies the average spectrum shows a steepening of the radio spectrum from 1.4 to 22.5 GHz. This is unexpected because in sources with high rates of star formation we expect flat spectrum, free-free emission to make a significant contribution to the radio flux at higher radio frequencies. Despite this trend the radio spectral indices between 8.4 and 22.5 GHz are flatter for sources with higher values of the FIR-radio flux density ratio q, when this is calculated at 8.4 GHz. Therefore, sources that are deficient in radio emission relative to FIR emission (presumably younger sources) have a larger thermal component to their radio emission. However, we find no correlation between the radio spectral index between 1.4 and 4.8 GHz and q at 8.4 GHz. Because the low frequency spectral index is affected by free-free absorption, and this is a function of source size for a given mass of ionized gas, this is evidence that the ionized gas in ULIRGs shows a range of densities. The youngest LIRGs and ULIRGs are characterized by a larger contribution to their high-frequency radio spectra from free-free emission. However, the youngest sources are not those that have the greatest free-free absorption at low radio frequencies. The sources in which the effects of free-free absorption are strongest are instead the most compact sources. Although these have the warmest FIR colours, they are not necessarily the youngest sources.
  • We have studied the submillimetre (submm) properties of the following classes of near-infrared (NIR)-selected massive galaxies at high redshifts: BzK-selected star-forming galaxies (BzKs); distant red galaxies (DRGs); and extremely red objects (EROs). We used the SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES), the largest uniform submm survey to date. Partial overlap of SIRIUS/NIR images and SHADES in SXDF has allowed us to identify 4 submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies, which are detected in the mid-infrared, 24 micron, and the radio, 1.4 GHz. We find that all of our submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies satisfy the BzK selection criteria, except for one galaxy whose B-z and z-K colours are however close to the BzK colour boundary. Two of the submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies satisfy all of the selection criteria we considered, i.e. they belong to the BzK-DRG-ERO overlapping population, or `extremely red' BzKs. Although these extremely red BzKs are rare (0.25 arcmin^{-2}), up to 20 % of this population could be submm galaxies. This fraction is significantly higher than that found for other galaxy populations studied here. Via a stacking analysis, we have detected the 850 micron flux of submm-faint BzKs and EROs in our SCUBA maps. While the contribution of z~2 BzKs to the submm background is about 10--15 % and similar to that from EROs typically at z~1, BzKs have a higher fraction (~30 %) of submm flux in resolved sources compared with EROs and submm sources as a whole. From the SED fitting analysis for both submm-bright and submm-faint BzKs, we found no clear signature that submm-bright BzKs are experiencing a specifically luminous evolutionary phase, compared with submm-faint BzKs. An alternative explanation might be that submm-bright BzKs are more massive than submm-faint ones.
  • We present new HI observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 3741. This galaxy has an extremely extended HI disk, which allows us to trace the rotation curve out to unprecedented distances in terms of the optical disk: we reach 42 B-band exponential scale lengths or about 7 kpc. The HI disk is strongly warped, but the warp is very symmetric. The distribution and kinematics are accurately derived by building model data cubes, which closely reproduce the observations. In order to account for the observed features in the data cube, radial motions of the order of 5-13 km/s are needed. They are consistent with an inner bar of several hundreds of pc and accretion of material in the outer regions. The observed rotation curve was decomposed into its stellar, gaseous and dark components. The Burkert dark halo (with a central constant density core) provides very good fits. The dark halo density distribution predicted by the LambdaCDM theory fails to fit the data, unless NGC 3741 is a 2.5-sigma exception to the predicted relation between concentration parameter and virial mass and has at the same time a high value of the virial mass (though poorly constrained) of 10$^{11}$ solar masses. Noticeably, MOND seems to be consistent with the observed rotation curve. Scaling up the contribution of the gaseous disk also gives a good fit.
  • We present high signal to noise ratio Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of 17 Virgo early-type galaxies. The galaxies were selected from those that define the colour-magnitude relation of the cluster, with the aim of detecting the silicate emission of their dusty, mass-losing evolved stars. To flux calibrate these extended sources we have devised a new procedure that allows us to obtain the intrinsic spectral energy distribution and to disentangle resolved and unresolved emission within the same object. We have found that thirteen objects of the sample (76%) are passively evolving galaxies with a pronounced broad silicate feature which is spatially extended and likely of stellar origin, in agreement with model predictions. The other 4 objects (24%) are characterized by different levels of activity. In NGC 4486 (M 87) the line emission and the broad silicate emission are evidently unresolved and, given also the typical shape of the continuum, they likely originate in the nuclear torus. NGC 4636 shows emission lines superimposed on extended (i.e. stellar) silicate emission, thus pushing the percentage of galaxies with silicate emission to 82%. Finally, NGC 4550 and NGC 4435 are characterized by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and line emission, arising from a central unresolved region. A more detailed analysis of our sample, with updated models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.
  • In this paper we analyze the evolution of actively star forming galaxies in the mid-infrared (MIR). This spectral region, characterized by continuum emission by hot dust and by the presence of strong emission features generally ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, is the most strongly affected by the heating processes associated with star formation and/or active galactic nuclei (AGN). Following the detailed observational characterization of galaxies in the MIR by ISO, we have updated the modelling of this spectral region in our spectro-photometric model GRASIL (Silva et al. 1998). In the diffuse component we have updated the treatment of PAHs according to the model by Li & Draine (2001). As for the dense phase of the ISM associated with the star forming regions, the molecular clouds, we strongly decrease the abundance of PAHs as compared to that in the cirrus, basing on the observational evidences of the lack or weakness of PAH bands close to the newly formed stars, possibly due to the destruction of the molecules in strong UV fields. The robustness of the model is checked by fitting near infrared to radio broad band spectra and the corresponding detailed MIR spectra of a large sample of galaxies (Lu et al. 2003), at once. With this model, we have analyzed the larger sample of actively star forming galaxies by Dale et al. (2000). We show that the observed trends of galaxies in the ISO-IRAS-Radio color-color plots can be interpreted in terms of different evolutionary phases of star formation activity, and the consequent different dominance in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the diffuse or dense phase of the ISM.
  • We examine the tight correlation observed between the far infrared (FIR) and radio emission in normal and star burst galaxies. We show that significant deviations from the average relation are to be expected in young star burst or post star burst galaxies, due to the different fading times of FIR and Radio power.
  • We have investigated the spectro-photometric properties of the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and their contribution to the integrated infrared emission in simple stellar populations (SSP). Adopting analytical relations describing the evolution of these stars in the HR diagram and empirical relations for the mass-loss rate and the wind terminal velocity, we were able to model the effects of the dusty envelope around these stars, with a minimal number of parameters. We computed isochrones at different age and initial metal content. We compare our models with existing infrared colors of M giants and Mira stars and with IRAS PSC data. Contrary to previous models, in the new isochrones the mass-loss rate, which establishes the duration of the AGB phase, also determines the spectral properties of the stars. The contribution of these stars to the integrated light of the population is thus obtained in a consistent way. We find that the emission in the mid infrared is about one order of magnitude larger when dust is taken into account in an intermediate age population, irrespective of the particular mixture adopted. The dependence of the integrated colors on the metallicity and age is discussed, with particular emphasis on the problem of age-metallicity degeneracy. We show that, contrary to the case of optical or near infrared colors, the adoption of a suitable pass-band in the mid infrared allows a fair separation of the two effects. We suggest intermediate redshift elliptical galaxies as possible targets of this method of solving the age-metallicity dilemma. The new SSP models constitute a first step in a more extended study aimed at modelling the spectral properties of the galaxies from the ultraviolet to the far infrared.