• GRB 111209A, one of the longest Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) ever observed, is linked to SN 2011kl, the most luminous GRB-Supernova (SN) detected so far, which shows evidence for being powered by a magnetar central engine. We place SN 2011kl into the context of large samples of SNe, addressing in more detail the question of whether it could be radioactively powered, and whether it represents an extreme version of a GRB-SN or an underluminous Superluminous SN (SLSN). We model SN 2011kl using SN 1998bw as a template and derive a bolometric light curve including near-infrared data. We compare the properties of SN 2011kl to literature results on stripped-envelope and superluminous supernovae. Comparison in the k,s context, i.e., comparing it to SN 1998bw templates in terms of luminosity and light-curve stretch, clearly shows SN 2011kl is the most luminous GRB-SN to date, and it is spectrally very dissimilar to other events, being significantly bluer/hotter. Although SN 2011kl does not reach the classical luminosity threshold of SLSNe and evolves faster than any of them, it resembles SLSNe more than the classical GRB-associated broad-lined Type Ic SNe in several aspects. GRB 111209A was a very energetic event, both at early (prompt emission) and at very late (SN) times. We have shown in a further publication that with the exception of the extreme duration, the GRB and afterglow parameters are in agreement with the known distributions for these parameters. SN 2011kl, on the other hand, is exceptional both in luminosity and spectral characteristics, indicating that GRB 111209A was likely not powered by a standard-model collapsar central engine, further supporting our earlier conclusions. Instead, it reveals the possibility of a direct link between GRBs and SLSNe.
  • We investigate the light-curve properties of a sample of 26 spectroscopically confirmed hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) in the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. These events are brighter than SNe Ib/c and SNe Ic-BL, on average, by about 4 and 2~mag, respectively. The peak absolute magnitudes of SLSNe-I in rest-frame $g$ band span $-22\lesssim M_g \lesssim-20$~mag, and these peaks are not powered by radioactive $^{56}$Ni, unless strong asymmetries are at play. The rise timescales are longer for SLSNe than for normal SNe Ib/c, by roughly 10 days, for events with similar decay times. Thus, SLSNe-I can be considered as a separate population based on photometric properties. After peak, SLSNe-I decay with a wide range of slopes, with no obvious gap between rapidly declining and slowly declining events. The latter events show more irregularities (bumps) in the light curves at all times. At late times, the SLSN-I light curves slow down and cluster around the $^{56}$Co radioactive decay rate. Powering the late-time light curves with radioactive decay would require between 1 and 10${\rm M}_\odot$ of Ni masses. Alternatively, a simple magnetar model can reasonably fit the majority of SLSNe-I light curves, with four exceptions, and can mimic the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Co, up to $\sim400$ days from explosion. The resulting spin values do not correlate with the host-galaxy metallicities. Finally, the analysis of our sample cannot strengthen the case for using SLSNe-I for cosmology.
  • Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are simple in the most basic model, but can show many complex features. The ultra-long duration GRB 111209A, one of the longest GRBs ever detected, also has the best-monitored afterglow in this rare class of GRBs. We want to address the question whether GRB 111209A was a special event beyond its extreme duration alone, and whether it is a classical GRB or another kind of high-energy transient. The afterglow may yield significant clues. We present afterglow photometry obtained in seven bands with the GROND imager as well as in further seven bands with the UVOT telescope on-board the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. The light curve is analysed by multi-band modelling and joint fitting with power-laws and broken power-laws, and we use the contemporaneous GROND data to study the evolution of the spectral energy distribution. We compare the optical afterglow to a large ensemble we have analysed in earlier works, and especially to that of another ultra-long event, GRB 130925A. We furthermore undertake a photometric study of the host galaxy. We find a strong, chromatic rebrightening event at approx 0.8 days after the GRB, during which the spectral slope becomes redder. After this, the light curve decays achromatically, with evidence for a break at about 9 days after the trigger. The afterglow luminosity is found to not be exceptional. We find that a double-jet model is able to explain the chromatic rebrightening. The afterglow features have been detected in other events and are not unique. The duration aside, the GRB prompt emission and afterglow parameters of GRB 111209A are in agreement with the known distributions for these parameters. While the central engine of this event may differ from that of classical GRBs, there are multiple lines of evidence pointing to GRB 111209A resulting from the core-collapse of a massive star with a stripped envelope.
  • In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • Wide-field surveys are discovering a growing number of rare transients whose physical origin is not yet well understood. Here, we present optical and UV data and analysis of iPTF16asu, a luminous, rapidly-evolving, high velocity, stripped-envelope supernova. With a rest-frame rise-time of just 4 days and a peak absolute magnitude of $M_{\rm g}=-20.4$ mag, the light curve of iPTF16asu is faster and more luminous than previous rapid transients. The spectra of iPTF16asu show a featureless, blue continuum near peak that develops into a Type Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. We show that while the late-time light curve could plausibly be powered by $^{56}$Ni decay, the early emission requires a different energy source. Non-detections in the X-ray and radio strongly constrain any associated gamma-ray burst to be low-luminosity. We suggest that the early emission may have been powered by either a rapidly spinning-down magnetar, or by shock breakout in an extended envelope of a very energetic explosion. In either scenario a central engine is required, making iPTF16asu an intriguing transition object between superluminous supernovae, Type Ic-BL supernovae, and low-energy gamma-ray bursts.
  • We present two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), namely SN2013hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN2008es are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad Halpha feature during the photospheric phase and also do not show any sign of strong interaction between fast-moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Despite PS15br peak luminosity is fainter than the other two objects, the spectrophotometric evolution is similar to SN2013hx and different than any other supernova in a similar luminosity space. We group all of them as SLSNe II and hence distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a strong, multi-component Halpha emission after 200 days past maximum which we interpret as an indication of interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to type II supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evolve on slower timescales. This is qualitatively similar to how SLSNe I compare with normal type Ic in that the former are brighter and evolve more slowly. We apply a magnetar and an interaction semi-analytical codes to fit the light curves of our two objects and SN2008es. The overall observational dataset would tend to favour the magnetar, or central engine, model as the source of the peak luminosity although the clear signature of late-time interaction indicates that interaction can play a role in the luminosity evolution of SLSNe II at some phases.
  • The progenitors of astronomical transients are linked to a specific stellar population and galactic environment, and observing their host galaxies hence constrains the physical nature of the transient itself. Here, we use imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, and spatially-resolved, medium resolution spectroscopy from the Very Large Telescope obtained with X-Shooter and MUSE to study the host of the very luminous transient ASASSN-15lh. The dominant stellar population at the transient site is old (around 1 to 2 Gyr), without signs of recent star-formation. We also detect emission from ionized gas, originating from three different, time-invariable, narrow components of collisionally-excited metal and Balmer lines. The ratios of emission lines in the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagnostic diagram indicate that the ionization source is a weak Active Galactic Nucleus with a black hole mass of $M_\bullet = 5_{-3}^{+8}\cdot10^{8} M_\odot$, derived through the $M_\bullet$-$\sigma$ relation. The narrow line components show spatial and velocity offsets on scales of 1 kpc and 500 km/s, respectively; these offsets are best explained by gas kinematics in the narrow-line region. The location of the central component, which we argue is also the position of the supermassive black hole, aligns with that of the transient within an uncertainty of 170 pc. Using this positional coincidence as well as other similarities with the hosts of Tidal Disruption Events, we strengthen the argument that the transient emission observed as ASASSN-15lh is related to the disruption of a star around a supermassive black hole, most probably spinning with a Kerr parameter $a_\bullet\gtrsim0.5$.
  • The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES (SUSHIES) survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to $z\sim4$. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star-formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the $B$-band and the far UV luminosity ($3\sigma$ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above $10^{10}~M_\odot$ for both classes of SLSNe. In the case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.4$ solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.8$ solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this sub-class.
  • S. J. Smartt, T.-W. Chen, A. Jerkstrand, M. Coughlin, E. Kankare, S. A. Sim, M. Fraser, C. Inserra, K. Maguire, K. C. Chambers, M. E. Huber, T. Kruhler, G. Leloudas, M. Magee, L. J. Shingles, K. W. Smith, D. R. Young, J. Tonry, R. Kotak, A. Gal-Yam, J. D. Lyman, D. S. Homan, C. Agliozzo, J. P. Anderson, C. R. Angus C. Ashall, C. Barbarino, F. E. Bauer, M. Berton, M. T. Botticella, M. Bulla, J. Bulger, G. Cannizzaro, Z. Cano, R. Cartier, A. Cikota, P. Clark, A. De Cia, M. Della Valle, L. Denneau, M. Dennefeld, L. Dessart, G. Dimitriadis, N. Elias-Rosa, R. E. Firth, H. Flewelling, A. Flors, A. Franckowiak, C. Frohmaier, L. Galbany, S. Gonzalez-Gaitan, J. Greiner, M. Gromadzki, A. Nicuesa Guelbenzu, C. P. Gutierrez, A. Hamanowicz, L. Hanlon, J. Harmanen, K. E. Heintz, A. Heinze, M.-S. Hernandez, S. T. Hodgkin, I. M. Hook, L. Izzo, P. A. James, P. G. Jonker, W. E. Kerzendorf, S. Klose, Z. Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, M. Kowalski, M. Kromer, H. Kuncarayakti, A. Lawrence, T. B. Lowe, E. A. Magnier, I. Manulis, A. Martin-Carrillo, S. Mattila, O. McBrien, A. Muller, J. Nordin, D. O'Neill, F. Onori, J. T. Palmerio, A. Pastorello, F. Patat, G. Pignata, Ph. Podsiadlowski, M. L. Pumo, S. J. Prentice, A. Rau, A. Razza, A. Rest, T. Reynolds, R. Roy, A. J. Ruiter, K. A. Rybicki, L. Salmon, P. Schady, A. S. B. Schultz, T. Schweyer, I. R. Seitenzahl, M. Smith, J. Sollerman, B. Stalder, C. W. Stubbs, M. Sullivan, H. Szegedi, F. Taddia, S. Taubenberger, G. Terreran, B. van Soelen, J. Vos, R. J. Wainscoat, N. A. Walton, C. Waters, H. Weiland, M. Willman, P. Wiseman, D. E. Wright, L. Wyrzykowski, O. Yaron
    Oct. 17, 2017 astro-ph.HE
    Gravitational waves were discovered with the detection of binary black hole mergers and they should also be detectable from lower mass neutron star mergers. These are predicted to eject material rich in heavy radioactive isotopes that can power an electromagnetic signal called a kilonova. The gravitational wave source GW170817 arose from a binary neutron star merger in the nearby Universe with a relatively well confined sky position and distance estimate. Here we report observations and physical modelling of a rapidly fading electromagnetic transient in the galaxy NGC4993, which is spatially coincident with GW170817 and a weak short gamma-ray burst. The transient has physical parameters broadly matching the theoretical predictions of blue kilonovae from neutron star mergers. The emitted electromagnetic radiation can be explained with an ejected mass of 0.04 +/- 0.01 Msol, with an opacity of kappa <= 0.5 cm2/gm at a velocity of 0.2 +/- 0.1c. The power source is constrained to have a power law slope of beta = -1.2 +/- 0.3, consistent with radioactive powering from r-process nuclides. We identify line features in the spectra that are consistent with light r-process elements (90 < A < 140). As it fades, the transient rapidly becomes red, and emission may have contribution by a higher opacity, lanthanide-rich ejecta component. This indicates that neutron star mergers produce gravitational waves, radioactively powered kilonovae, and are a nucleosynthetic source of the r-process elements.
  • We present observations of two new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I), iPTF15esb and iPTF16bad, showing late-time H-alpha emission with line luminosities of (1-3)e+41 erg/s and velocity widths of (4000-6000) km/s. Including the previously published iPTF13ehe, this makes up a total of three such events to date. iPTF13ehe is one of the most luminous and the slowest evolving SLSNe-I, whereas the other two are less luminous and fast decliners. We interpret this as a result of the ejecta running into a neutral H-shell located at a radius of ~ 1.0e+16cm. This implies that violent mass loss must have occurred several decades before the supernova explosion. Such a short time interval suggests that eruptive mass loss could be common shortly prior to the death of a massive star as a SLSN. And more importantly, helium is unlikely to be completely stripped off the progenitor stars and could be present in the ejecta. It is a mystery why helium features are not detected, even though non-thermal energy sources, capable of ionizing He atoms, may exist as suggested by the O II absorption series in the early time spectra. At late times (+240d), our spectra appear to have intrinsically lower [O I]6300A luminosities than that of SN2015bn and SN2007bi, possibly an indication of smaller oxygen masses (<10-30Msun). The blue-shifted H-alpha emission relative to the hosts for all three events may be in tension with the binary star model proposed for iPTF13ehe. Finally, iPTF15esb has a peculiar light curve with three peaks separated from one another by ~ 22 days. The LC undulation is higher in bluer bands. One possible explanation is eject-CSM interaction.
  • The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
  • We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
  • We present the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the type Ic supernova LSQ14efd, discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and followed by PESSTO. LSQ14efd was discovered few days after explosion and the observations cover up to ~100 days. The early photometric points show the signature of the cooling of the shock break-out event experienced by the progenitor at the time of the supernova explosion, one of the first for a type Ic supernova. A comparison with type Ic supernova spectra shows that LSQ14efd is quite similar to the type Ic SN 2004aw. These two supernovae have kinetic energies that are intermediate between standard Ic explosions and those which are the most energetic explosions known (e.g. SN 1998bw). We computed an analytical model for the light-curve peak and estimated the mass of the ejecta 6.3 +/- 0.5 Msun, a synthesized nickel mass of 0.25 Msun and a kinetic energy of Ekin = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10^51 erg. No connection between LSQ14efd and a GRB event could be established. However we point out that the supernova shows some spectroscopic similarities with the peculiar SN-Ia 1999ac and the SN-Iax SN 2008A. A core-collapse origin is most probable considering the spectroscopic, photometric evolution and the detection of the cooling of the shock break-out.
  • SN 2002cx-like Type Ia supernovae (also known as SNe Iax) represent one of the most numerous peculiar SN classes. They differ from normal SNe Ia by having fainter peak magnitudes, faster decline rates and lower photospheric velocities, displaying a wide diversity in these properties. We present both integral-field and long-slit visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the host galaxies and explosion sites of SNe Iax to provide constraints on their progenitor formation scenarios. The SN Iax explosion site metallicity distribution is similar to that of core-collapse (CC) SNe and metal-poor compared to normal SNe Ia. Fainter members, speculated to form distinctly from brighter SN Iax, are found at a range of metallicities, extending to very metal-poor environments. Although the SN Iax explosion sites' ages and star-formation rates are comparatively older and less intense than the distribution of star forming regions across their host galaxies, we confirm the presence of young stellar populations (SP) at explosion environments for most SNe Iax, expanded here to a larger sample. Ages of the young SP (several $\times 10^{7}$ to $10^8$~yrs) are consistent with predictions for young thermonuclear and electron-capture SN progenitors. The lack of extremely young SP at the explosion sites disfavours very massive progenitors such as Wolf-Rayet explosions with significant fall-back. We find weak ionised gas in the only SN Iax host without obvious signs of star-formation. The source of the ionisation remains ambiguous but appears unlikely to be mainly due to young, massive stars.
  • We present ground-based and \textit{Swift} observations of iPTF16fnl, a likely tidal disruption event (TDE) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) survey at 66.6 Mpc. The lightcurve of the object peaked at absolute $M_g=-17.2$ mag. The maximum bolometric luminosity (from optical and UV) was $L_p~\simeq~(1.0\,\pm\,0.15) \times 10^{43}$ erg/s, an order of magnitude fainter than any other optical TDE discovered so far. The luminosity in the first 60 days is consistent with an exponential decay, with $L \propto e^{-(t-t_0)/\tau}$, where $t_0$=~57631.0 (MJD) and $\tau\simeq 15$ days. The X-ray shows a marginal detection at $L_X=2.4^{1.9}_{-1.1}\times 10^{39}$ erg/s (\textit{Swift} X-ray Telescope). No radio counterpart was detected down to 3$\sigma$, providing upper limits for monochromatic radio luminosity of $\nu L_{\nu} < 2.3\times10^{36}$ erg/s and $\nu L_{\nu}<1.7\times 10^{37}$ erg/s (VLA, 6.1 and 22 GHz). The blackbody temperature, obtained from combined \textit{Swift} UV and optical photometry, shows a constant value of 19,000 K. The transient spectrum at peak is characterized by broad He II and H$\alpha$ emission lines, with an FWHM of about 14,000 km/s and 10,000 km/s respectively. He I lines are also detected at $\lambda\lambda$ 5875 and 6678. The spectrum of the host is dominated by strong Balmer absorption lines, which are consistent with a post-starburst (E+A) galaxy with an age of $\sim$650 Myr and solar metallicity. The characteristics of iPTF16fnl make it an outlier on both luminosity and decay timescales, as compared to other optically selected TDEs. The discovery of such a faint optical event suggests a higher rate of tidal disruptions, as low luminosity events may have gone unnoticed in previous searches.
  • When a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole, it will be torn apart. For a star with the mass of the Sun ($M_\odot$) and a non-spinning black hole with a mass $<10^8 M_\odot$, the tidal radius lies outside the black hole event horizon and the disruption results in a luminous flare. Here we report observations over a period of 10 months of a transient, hitherto interpreted as a superluminous supernova. Our data show that the transient rebrightened substantially in the ultraviolet and that the spectrum went through three different spectroscopic phases without ever becoming nebular. Our observations are more consistent with a tidal disruption event than a superluminous supernova because of the temperature evolution, the presence of highly ionised CNO gas in the line of sight and our improved localisation of the transient in the nucleus of a passive galaxy, where the presence of massive stars is highly unlikely. While the supermassive black hole has a mass $> 10^8 M_\odot$, a star with the same mass as the Sun could be disrupted outside the event horizon if the black hole were spinning rapidly. The rapid spin and high black hole mass can explain the high luminosity of this event.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts are a rare subclass of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae that launch collimated relativistic outflows (jets). All gamma-ray-burst-associated supernovae are spectroscopically of Type Ic with broad lines, but the fraction of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae harboring low-luminosity gamma-ray-burst remains largely unconstrained. Some supernovae should be accompanied by off-axis $\gamma$-ray burst jets that remain invisible initially, but then emerge as strong radio sources (as the jets decelerate). However, this critical prediction of the jet model for gamma-ray bursts has yet to be verified observationally. Here, we present K. G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of 15 broad-lined supernovae of Type Ic discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory in an untargeted manner. Most of the supernovae in our sample exclude radio emission observationally similar to that of the radio-loud, relativistic SN\,1998bw. We constrain the fraction of 1998bw-like broad-lined Type Ic supernovae to be <~ 41% (99.865% confidence). Most of the events in our sample also exclude off-axis jets similar to GRB 031203 and GRB 030329, but we cannot rule out off-axis gamma-ray-bursts expanding in a low-density wind environment. Three supernovae in our sample are detected in the radio. PTF11qcj and PTF14dby show late-time radio emission with average ejecta speeds of ~(0.3-0.4)c, on the dividing line between relativistic and "ordinary" supernovae. The speed of PTF11cmh radio ejecta is poorly constrained. We estimate that <~ 85% (99.865% confidence) of the broad-lined Type Ic supernovae in our sample may harbor off-axis $\gamma$-ray-bursts expanding in media with densities in the range probed by this study.
  • Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6x10^-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.
  • Very massive stars in the final phases of their lives often show unpredictable outbursts that can mimic supernovae, so-called, "SN impostors", but the distinction is not always straigthforward. Here we present observations of a luminous blue variable (LBV) in NGC 2770 in outburst over more than 20 years that experienced a possible terminal explosion as type IIn SN in 2015, named SN 2015bh. This possible SN or "main event" was preceded by a precursor peaking $\sim$ 40 days before maximum. The total energy release of the main event is $\sim$1.8$\times$10$^{49}$ erg, which can be modeled by a $<$ 0.5 M$_\odot$ shell plunging into a dense CSM. All emission lines show a single narrow P-Cygni profile during the LBV phase and a double P-Cygni profile post maximum suggesting an association of this second component with the possible SN. Since 1994 the star has been redder than during a typical S-Dor like outburst. SN 2015bh lies within a spiral arm of NGC 2770 next to a number of small star-forming regions with a metallicity of $\sim$ 0.5 solar and a stellar population age of 7-10 Myr. SN 2015bh shares many similarities with SN 2009ip, which, together with other examples may form a new class of objects that exhibit outbursts a few decades prior to "hyper-eruption" or final core-collapse. If the star survives this event it is undoubtedly altered, and we suggest that these "zombie stars" may evolve from an LBV to a Wolf Rayet star over a very short timescale of only a few years. The final fate of these types of massive stars can only be determined with observations years after the possible SN.
  • iPTF14atg, a subluminous peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) similar to SN 2002es, is the first SN Ia for which a strong UV flash was observed in the early-time light curves. This has been interpreted as evidence for a single-degenerate (SD) progenitor system where such a signal is expected from interactions between the SN ejecta and the non-degenerate companion star. Here, we compare synthetic observables of multi-dimensional state-of-the-art explosion models for different progenitor scenarios to the light curves and spectra of iPTF14atg. From our models, we have difficulties explaining the spectral evolution of iPTF14atg within the SD progenitor channel. In contrast, we find that a violent merger of two carbon-oxygen white dwarfs with 0.9 and 0.76 solar masses, respectively, provides an excellent match to the spectral evolution of iPTF14atg from 10d before to several weeks after maximum light. Our merger model does not naturally explain the initial UV flash of iPTF14atg. We discuss several possibilities like interactions of the SN ejecta with the circum-stellar medium and surface radioactivity from a He ignited merger that may be able to account for the early UV emission in violent merger models.
  • Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) have recently been proposed as metallicity ($Z$) probes. The spectral models of Dessart et al. (2014) showed that the pseudo-equivalent width of Fe II $\lambda$5018 (pEW$_{5018}$) during the plateau phase depends on the primordial $Z$, but there was a paucity of SNe IIP exhibiting pEW$_{5018}$ that were compatible with $Z < 0.4$ ${\rm Z}_{\odot}$. This lack might be due to some physical property of the SN II population or to the fact that those SNe have been discovered in luminous, metal-rich targeted galaxies. Here we use SN II observations from the untargeted (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory [(i)PTF] survey, aiming to investigate the pEW$_{5018}$ distribution of this SN population and, in particular, to look for the presence of SNe II at lower $Z$. We perform pEW$_{5018}$ measurements on the spectra of a sample of 39 (i)PTF SNe II, selected to have well-constrained explosion epochs and light-curve properties. Based on the comparison with the pEW$_{5018}$ spectral models, we subgrouped our SNe into four $Z$ bins from $Z \approx 0.1$ $Z_{\odot}$ up to $Z \approx 2$ $Z_{\odot}$. We also independently investigated the $Z$ of the hosts by using their absolute magnitudes and colors and, in a few cases, using strong-line diagnostics from spectra. We searched for possible correlations between SN observables, such as their peak magnitudes and the $Z$ inferred from pEW$_{5018}$. We found 11 events with pEW$_{5018}$ that were small enough to indicate $Z \approx 0.1$ $Z_{\odot}$. The trend of pEW$_{5018}$ with $Z$ matches the $Z$ estimates obtained from the host-galaxy photometry, although the significance of the correlation is weak. We also found that SNe with brighter peak magnitudes have smaller pEW$_{5018}$ and occur at lower $Z$.
  • Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar H-rich event with a long-rising (LR) light curve (LC), stemming from a compact blue supergiant star (BSG). Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature. We present new data for a sample of 6 LR Type II SNe (SNe II), 3 of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and 3 observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge the family of LR SNe II, characterizing their properties. Spectra, LCs, and host-galaxies (HG) of these SNe are presented. Comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events are shown, with emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and HG metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband LC. By modeling the early-time LCs with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these SNe and other progenitor parameters. We present PTF12kso, a LR SN II with the largest amount of 56Ni mass for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest HG metallicities for this SN group. The variety of early LC luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii, from a few tens of solar radii (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with intermediate cases between 100 (PTF09gpn) and 300 solar radii (SN 2004em). We confirm that LR SNe II with LC shapes closely resembling that of SN 1987A generally arise from BSGs. However, some of them likely have progenitors with larger radii (~300 solar radii, typical of yellow supergiants) and can thus be regarded as intermediate cases between normal SNe IIP and SN 1987A-like SNe. Some extended red supergiant (RSG) stars such as the progenitor of SN 2004ek can also produce LR SNe II if they synthesized a large amount of 56Ni. Low HG metallicity is confirmed as a characteristic of BSG SNe.
  • We assemble a sample of 24 hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). Parameterizing the light curve shape through rise and decline timescales shows that the two are highly correlated. Magnetar-powered models can reproduce the correlation, with the diversity in rise and decline rates driven by the diffusion timescale. Circumstellar interaction models can exhibit a similar rise-decline relation, but only for a narrow range of densities, which may be problematic for these models. We find that SLSNe are approximately 3.5 magnitudes brighter and have light curves 3 times broader than SNe Ibc, but that the intrinsic shapes are similar. There are a number of SLSNe with particularly broad light curves, possibly indicating two progenitor channels, but statistical tests do not cleanly separate two populations. The general spectral evolution is also presented. Velocities measured from Fe II are similar for SLSNe and SNe Ibc, suggesting that diffusion time differences are dominated by mass or opacity. Flat velocity evolution in most SLSNe suggests a dense shell of ejecta. If opacities in SLSNe are similar to other SNe Ibc, the average ejected mass is higher by a factor 2-3. Assuming $\kappa=0.1\,$cm$^2\,$g$^{-1}$, we estimate a mean (median) SLSN ejecta mass of 10$\,$M$_\odot$ (6$\,$M$_\odot$), with a range of 3-30$\,$M$_\odot$. Doubling the assumed opacity brings the masses closer to normal SNe Ibc, but with a high-mass tail. The most probable mechanism for generating SLSNe seems to be the core-collapse of a very massive hydrogen-poor star, forming a millisecond magnetar.
  • [Abridged] We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.6, the largest sample of GRB host spectroscopy available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5<z<2.5 with a median z~1.6. Based on Balmer and/or forbidden lines of oxygen, nitrogen, and neon, we measure systemic redshifts, star formation rates (SFRs), visual attenuations, oxygen abundances (12+log(O/H)), and emission-line widths. We find a strong change of the typical physical properties of GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallicities is around 20% at z<1 in the adopted metallicity scale. This is significantly less than the fraction of star formation in similar galaxies, illustrating that GRBs are scarce in high-metallicity environments. At z~3, sensitivity limits us to probing only the most luminous GRB hosts for which we derive metallicities of Z ~< 0.5 Z_sun. Together with a high incidence of galaxies with similar metallicity in our sample at z~1.5, this indicates that the metallicity dependence observed at low redshift will not be dominant at z~3.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\sim50\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects which point to a similar diversity, currently not accounted for in the analyses when SNe~Ia are used for studying the expansion history of the universe.