• We report on an optical setup generating more than one bit of randomness from one entangled bit (i.e. a maximally entangled state of two-qubits). The amount of randomness is certified through the observation of Bell non-local correlations. To attain this result we implemented a high-purity entanglement source and a non-projective three-outcome measurement. Our implementation achieves a gain of 27$\%$ of randomness as compared with the standard methods using projective measurements. Additionally we estimate the amount of randomness certified in a one-sided device independent scenario, through the observation of EPR steering. Our results prove that non-projective quantum measurements allows extending the limits for nonlocality-based certified randomness generation using current technology.
  • Recently, a protocol for quantum state discrimination (QSD) in a multi-party scenario has been introduced [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 100501 (2013)]. In this protocol, Alice generates a quantum system in one of two pre-defined non-orthogonal qubit states, and the goal is to send the generated state information to different parties without classical communication exchanged between them during the protocol's session. The interesting feature is that, by resorting to sequential generalized measurements onto this single system, there is a non-vanishing probability that all observers identify the state prepared by Alice. Here, we present the experimental implementation of this protocol based on polarization single-photon states. Our scheme works over an optical network, and since QSD lies in the core of many protocols, it represents a step towards experimental multi-party quantum information processing.
  • Multiplexing is a strategy to augment the transmission capacity of a communication system. It consists of combining multiple signals over the same data channel and it has been very successful in classical communications. However, the use of enhanced channels has only reached limited practicality in quantum communications (QC) as it requires the complex manipulation of quantum systems of higher dimensions. Considerable effort is being made towards QC using high-dimensional quantum systems encoded into the transverse momentum of single photons but, so far, no approach has been proven to be fully compatible with the existing telecommunication infrastructure. Here, we overcome such a technological challenge and demonstrate a stable and secure high-dimensional decoy-state quantum key distribution session over a 0.3 km long multicore optical fiber. The high-dimensional quantum states are defined in terms of the multiple core modes available for the photon transmission over the fiber, and the decoy-state analysis demonstrates that our technique enables a positive secret key generation rate up to 25 km of fiber propagation. Finally, we show how our results build up towards a high-dimensional quantum network composed of free-space and fiber based links
  • Side-channel attacks currently constitute the main challenge for quantum key distribution (QKD) to bridge theory with practice. So far two main approaches have been introduced to address this problem, (full) device-independent QKD and measurement-device-independent QKD. Here we present a third solution that might exceed the performance and practicality of the previous two in circumventing detector side-channel attacks, which arguably is the most hazardous part of QKD implementations. Our proposal has, however, one main requirement: the legitimate users of the system need to ensure that their labs do not leak any unwanted information to the outside. The security in the low-loss regime is guaranteed, while in the high-loss regime we already prove its robustness against some eavesdropping strategies.
  • A long standing problem in quantum mechanics is the minimum number of observables required for the characterisation of unknown pure quantum states. The solution to this problem is specially important for the developing field of high-dimensional quantum information processing. In this work we demonstrate that any pure d-dimensional state is unambiguously reconstructed by measuring 5 observables, that is, via projective measurements onto the states of 5 orthonormal bases. Thus, in our method the total number of different measurement outcomes (5d) scales linearly with d. The state reconstruction is robust against experimental errors and requires simple post-processing, regardless of d. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of our scheme through the reconstruction of 8-dimensional quantum states, encoded in the momentum of single photons.
  • Due to practical reasons, experimental and theoretical continuous-variable (CV) quantum information (QI) has been heavily based on Gaussian states. Nevertheless, many CV-QI protocols require the use of non-Gaussian states and operations. Here, we show that the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering inequality can be used to obtain a practical witness for the generation of pure bipartite non-Gaussian states. While the scenario require pure states, we show its broad relevance by reporting the experimental observation of the non-Gaussianity of the CV two-photon state generated in the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). The observed non-Gaussianity is due only to the intrinsic phase-matching conditions of SPDC
  • Any practical realization of entanglement-based quantum communication must be intrinsically secure and able to span long distances avoiding the need of a straight line between the communicating parties. The violation of Bell's inequality offers a method for the certification of quantum links without knowing the inner workings of the devices. Energy-time entanglement quantum communication satisfies all these requirements. However, currently there is a fundamental obstacle with the standard configuration adopted: an intrinsic geometrical loophole that can be exploited to break the security of the communication, in addition to other loopholes. Here we show the first experimental Bell violation with energy-time entanglement distributed over 1 km of optical fibers that is free of this geometrical loophole. This is achieved by adopting a new experimental design, and by using an actively stabilized fiber-based long interferometer. Our results represent an important step towards long-distance secure quantum communication in optical fibers.
  • We show that for two-qubit chained Bell inequalities with an arbitrary number of measurement settings, nonlocality and entanglement are not only different properties but are inversely related. Specifically, we analytically prove that in absence of noise, robustness of nonlocality, defined as the maximum fraction of detection events that can be lost such that the remaining ones still do not admit a local model, and concurrence are inversely related for any chained Bell inequality with an arbitrary number of settings. The closer quantum states are to product states, the harder it is to reproduce quantum correlations with local models. We also show that, in presence of noise, nonlocality and entanglement are simultaneously maximized only when the noise level is equal to the maximum level tolerated by the inequality; in any other case, a more nonlocal state is always obtained by reducing the entanglement. In addition, we observed that robustness of nonlocality and concurrence are also inversely related for the Bell scenarios defined by the tight two-qubit three-setting $I_{3322}$ inequality, and the tight two-qutrit inequality $I_3$.
  • The secure transfer of information is an important problem in modern telecommunications. Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides a solution to this problem by using individual quantum systems to generate correlated bits between remote parties, that can be used to extract a secret key. QKD with D-dimensional quantum channels provides security advantages that grow with increasing D. However, the vast majority of QKD implementations has been restricted to two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher dimensions for real-world quantum cryptography by performing, for the first time, a fully automated QKD session based on the BB84 protocol with 16-dimensional quantum states. Information is encoded in the single-photon transverse momentum and the required states are dynamically generated with programmable spatial light modulators. Our setup paves the way for future developments in the field of experimental high-dimensional QKD.
  • Recently, V\'{e}rtesi and Bene [Phys. Rev. A. {\bf 82}, 062115 (2010)] derived a two-qubit Bell inequality, $I_{CH3}$, which they show to be maximally violated only when more general positive operator valued measures (POVMs) are used instead of the usual von Neumann measurements. Here we consider a general parametrization for the three-element-POVM involved in the Bell test and obtain a higher quantum bound for the $I_{CH3}$-inequality. With a higher quantum bound for $I_{CH3}$, we investigate if there is an experimental setup that can be used for observing that POVMs give higher violations in Bell tests based on this inequality. We analyze the maximum errors supported by the inequality to identify a source of entangled photons that can be used for the test. Then, we study if POVMs are also relevant in the more realistic case that partially entangled states are used in the experiment. Finally, we investigate which are the required efficiencies of the $I_{CH3}$-inequality, and the type of measurements involved, for closing the detection loophole. We obtain that POVMs allow for the lowest threshold detection efficiency, and that it is comparable to the minimal (in the case of two-qubits) required detection efficiency of the Clauser-Horne-Bell-inequality.
  • The Hardy test of nonlocality can be seen as a particular case of the Bell tests based on the Clauser-Horne (CH) inequality. Here we stress this connection when we analyze the relation between the CH-inequality violation, its threshold detection efficiency, and the measurement settings adopted in the test. It is well known that the threshold efficiencies decrease when one considers partially entangled states and that the use of these states, unfortunately, generates a reduction in the CH violation. Nevertheless, these quantities are both dependent on the measurement settings considered, and in this paper we show that there are measurement bases which allow for an optimal situation in this trade-off relation. These bases are given as a generalization of the Hardy measurement bases, and they will be relevant for future Bell tests relying on pairs of entangled qubits.
  • The state of the spatially correlated down-converted photons is usually treated as a two-mode Gaussian entangled state. While intuitively this seems to be reasonable, it is known that new structures in the spatial distributions of these photons can be observed when the phase-matching conditions are properly taken into account. Here, we study how the variances of the near- and far-field conditional probabilities are affected by the phase-matching functions, and we analyze the role of the EPR-criterion regarding the non-Gaussianity and entanglement detection of the spatial two-photon state of spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). Then we introduce a statistical measure, based on the negentropy of the joint distributions at the near- and far-field planes, which allows for the quantification of the non-Gaussianity of this state. This measure of non-Gaussianity requires only the measurement of the autocorrelation covariance sub-matrices, and will be relevant for new applications of the spatial correlation of SPDC in CV quantum information processing.
  • The theoretical approach to describe the defocusing microscopy technique by U. Agero et al. [Phys. Rev. E {\bf 67}, 051904 (2003)] assumes that the size of the objective lens aperture is infinite. This treatment gives that the intensity at the image plane depends on the laplacian of the phase introduced in the field by a pure phase object. In the present paper, we consider an arbitrary size for the aperture of the objective lens and we conclude that the intensity at the image plane depends also on the gradient of the phase introduced by the object and the phase itself. In this case, even an object that introduces only linear variations in the phase can be detected. Furthermore, we show that the contrast of the image of the phase object increases with the use of smaller objective apertures.
  • We present the experimental quantum tomography of 7- and 8-dimensional quantum systems based on projective measurements in the mutually unbiased basis (MUB-QT). One of the advantages of MUB-QT is that it requires projections from a minimal number of bases to be performed. In our scheme, the higher dimensional quantum systems are encoded using the propagation modes of single photons, and we take advantage of the capabilities of amplitude- and phase-modulation of programmable spatial light modulators to implement the MUB-QT.
  • We show two experimental realizations of Hardy ladder test of quantum nonlocality using energy-time correlated photons, following the scheme proposed by A. Cabello \emph{et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{102}, 040401 (2009)]. Unlike, previous energy-time Bell experiments, these tests require precise tailored nonmaximally entangled states. One of them is equivalent to the two-setting two-outcome Bell test requiring a minimum detection efficiency. The reported experiments are still affected by the locality and detection loopholes, but are free of the post-selection loophole of previous energy-time and time-bin Bell tests.
  • In this work we generate two-photon hybrid entangled states (HES), where the polarization of one photon is entangled with the transverse spatial degree of freedom of the second photon. The photon pair is created by parametric down-conversion in a polarization-entangled state. A birefringent double-slit couples the polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of these photons and finally, suitable spatial and polarization projections generate the HES. We investigate some interesting aspects of the two-photon hybrid interference, and present this study in the context of the complementarity relation that exists between the visibilities of the one- and two-photon interference patterns.
  • We investigate the practicality of the method proposed by Maciel et al. [Phys. Rev. A. 80, 032325(2009)] for detecting the entanglement of two spatial qutrits (3-dimensional quantum systems), which are encoded in the discrete transverse momentum of single photons transmitted through a multi-slit aperture. The method is based on the acquisition of partial information of the quantum state through projective measurements, and a data processing analysis done with semi-definite programs. This analysis relies on generating gradually an optimal entanglement witness operator, and numerical investigations have shown that it allows for the entanglement detection of unknown states with a cost much lower than full state tomography.
  • We study and experimentally implement a double-slit quantum eraser in the presence of a controlled decoherence mechanism. A two-photon state, produced in a spontaneous parametric down conversion process, is prepared in a maximally entangled polarization state. A birefringent double-slit is illuminated by one of the down-converted photons, and it acts as a single-photon two-qubits controlled not gate that couples the polarization with the transversal momentum of these photons. The other photon, that acts as a which-path marker, is sent through a Mach-Zehnder-like interferometer. When the interferometer is partially unbalanced, it behaves as a controlled source of decoherence for polarization states of down-converted photons. We show the transition from wave-like to particle-like behavior of the signal photons crossing the double-slit as a function of the decoherence parameter, which depends on the length path difference at the interferometer.
  • C. Adloff, Y. Karyotakis, J. Repond, A. Brandt, H. Brown, K. De, C. Medina, J. Smith, J. Li, M. Sosebee, A. White, J. Yu, T. Buanes, G. Eigen, Y. Mikami, O. Miller, N. K.Watson, J. A. Wilson, T. Goto, G.Mavromanolakis, M. A. Thomson, D. R.Ward, W. Yan, D. Benchekroun, A. Hoummada, Y. Khoulaki, M. Oreglia, M. Benyamna, C. Cârloganu, P. Gay, J. Ha, G. C. Blazey, D. Chakraborty, A. Dyshkant, K. Francis, D. Hedin, G. Lima, V. Zutshi, V. A. Babkin, S. N. Bazylev, Yu. I. Fedotov, V. M. Slepnev, I. A. Tiapkin, S. V.Volgin, J. -Y. Hostachy, L. Morin, N. D?Ascenzo, U. Cornett, D. David, R. Fabbri, G. Falley, N. Feege, K. Gadow, E. Garutti, P. Göttlicher, T. Jung, S. Karstensen, V.Korbel, A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce, B. Lutz, N.Meyer, V. Morgunov, M. Reinecke, S. Schätzel, S. Schmidt, F. Sefkow, P. Smirnov, A. Vargas-Trevino, N.Wattimena, O.Wendt, M. Groll, R. -D. Heuer, S. Richter, J. Samson, A. Kaplan, H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon, W. Shen, A. Tadday, B. Bilki, E. Norbeck, Y. Onel, E. J. Kim, G. Kim, D-W. Kim, K. Lee, S. C. Lee, K. Kawagoe, Y. Tamura, J. A. Ballin, P.D. Dauncey, A. -M.Magnan, H. Yilmaz, O. Zorba, V. Bartsch, M. Postranecky, M.Warren, M. Wing, M. Faucci Giannelli, M. G. Green, F. Salvatore, R. Kieffer, I. Laktineh, M.C Fouz, D. S. Bailey, R. J. Barlow, R. J. Thompson, M. Batouritski, O. Dvornikov, Yu. Shulhevich, N. Shumeiko, A. Solin, P. Starovoitov, V. Tchekhovski, A. Terletski, B. Bobchenko, M. Chadeeva, M. Danilov, O. Markin, R. Mizuk, V. Morgunov, E. Novikov, V. Rusinov, E. Tarkovsky, V. Andreev, N. Kirikova, A.Komar, V.Kozlov, P. Smirnov, Y. Soloviev, A. Terkulov, P. Buzhan, B. Dolgoshein, A. Ilyin, V. Kantserov, V. Kaplin, A. Karakash, E. Popova, S. Smirnov, N. Baranova, E. Boos, L. Gladilin, D. Karmanov, M.Korolev, M. Merkin, A. Savin, A.Voronin, A. Topkar, A. Freyk, C. Kiesling, S. Lu, K. Prothmann, K. Seidel, F. Simon, C. Soldner, L. Weuste, B. Bouquet, S. Callier, P. Cornebise, F. Dulucq, J. Fleury, H. Li, G. Martin-Chassard, F. Richard, Ch. de la Taille, R. Poeschl, L. Raux, M. Ruan, N. Seguin-Moreau, F. Wicek, M. Anduze, V. Boudry, J-C. Brient, G.Gaycken, R. Cornat, D. Jeans, P. Mora de Freitas, G. Musat, M. Reinhard, A. Rougé, J-Ch.Vanel, H. Videau, K-H. Park, J. Zacek, J. Cvach, P. Gallus, M. Havranek, M. Janata, J. Kvasnicka, M. Marcisovsky, I. Polak, J.Popule, L. Tomasek, M. Tomasek, P. Ruzicka, P. Sicho, J. Smolik, V. Vrba, J. Zalesak, Yu. Arestov, V.Ammosov, B. Chuiko, V. Gapienko, Y. Gilitski, V.Koreshev, A. Semak, Yu. Sviridov, V. Zaets, B. Belhorma, M. Belmir, A. Baird, R. N. Halsall, S.W. Nam, I. H. Park, J.Yang, Jong-Seo Chai, Jong-Tae Kim, Geun-Bum Kim, Y. Kim, J. Kang, Y. -J.Kwon, Ilgoo Kim, Taeyun Lee, Jaehong Park, Jinho Sung, S. Itoh, K.Kotera, M. Nishiyama, T. Takeshita, S.Weber, C. Zeitnitz
    March 13, 2010 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    An analog hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) prototype of 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths thickness has been constructed by members of the CALICE Collaboration. The AHCAL prototype consists of a 38-layer sandwich structure of steel plates and highly-segmented scintillator tiles that are read out by wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to SiPMs. The signal is amplified and shaped with a custom-designed ASIC. A calibration/monitoring system based on LED light was developed to monitor the SiPM gain and to measure the full SiPM response curve in order to correct for non-linearity. Ultimately, the physics goals are the study of hadron shower shapes and testing the concept of particle flow. The technical goal consists of measuring the performance and reliability of 7608 SiPMs. The AHCAL was commissioned in test beams at DESY and CERN. The entire prototype was completed in 2007 and recorded hadron showers, electron showers and muons at different energies and incident angles in test beams at CERN and Fermilab.
  • We report on an experimental violation of the Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (Bell-CHSH) inequality using energy-time entangled photons. The experiment is not free of the locality and detection loopholes, but is the first violation of the Bell-CHSH inequality using energy-time entangled photons which is free of the postselection loophole described by Aerts et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2872 (1999)].
  • In this work we study the transverse spatial correlation of the pair of photons generated via the process of spontaneous parametric frequency down-conversion, in periodically poled non-linear crystals illuminated by a pulsed laser beam. It is well known that the two-photon state generated in quasi-phase matching (QPM) configurations depends explicitly on the characteristics of the pump beam, on the crystal modulated non-linearity, and on the detection geometry. This has allowed the development of several techniques for controlling the biphoton spectral and spatial properties. Here we discuss another technique for implementing the spatial entanglement modification in QPM gratings. We show, theoretically and experimentally, that in nearly collinear geometries, the spatial shape modulation of the pump beam allows for the control of the biphoton transverse spatial correlation.
  • The study of how to generate high-dimensional quantum states (qudits) is justified by the advantages that they can bring for the field of quantum information. However, to have some real practical potential for quantum communication, these states must be also of simple manipulation. Spatial qudits states, which are generated by engineering the transverse momentum of the parametric down-converted photons, have been until now considered of hard manipulation. Nevertheless, we show in this work a simple technique for modifying these states. This technique is based on the use of programmable diffractive optical devices, that can act as spatial light modulators, to define the Hilbert space of these photons instead of pre-fabricated multi-slits.
  • In this work we propose a probabilistic method which allows an unambiguous modification of two non-orthogonal quantum states. We experimentally implement this protocol by using two-photon polarization states generated in the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion. In the experiment, for codifying initial quantum states, we consider single photon states and heralded detection. We show that the application of this protocol to entangled states, it allows a fine control of the amount of entanglement of the initial state.
  • In this paper we study the state determination for composite systems of two spatial qubits. We show, theoretically, that one can use the technique of quantum tomography to reconstruct the density matrixes of these systems. This tomographic reconstruction is based on the free evolution of the spatial qubits and a postelection process.
  • In a recent letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 100501 (2005)], we presented a scheme for generating pure entangled states of spatial qudits ($D$-dimensional quantum systems) by using the momentum transverse correlation of the parametric down-converted photons. In this work we discuss a generalization of this process to enable the creation of mixed states. With the technique proposed we experimentally generated a mixture of two spatial qubits.