• We have produced for the first time a detailed velocity map of the giant filamentary nebula surrounding NGC 1275, the Perseus cluster's brightest galaxy, and revealed a previously unknown rich velocity structure across the entire nebula. We present new observations of the low-velocity component of this nebula with the optical imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SITELLE at CFHT. With its wide field of view ($\sim$11'$\times$11'), SITELLE is the only integral field unit spectroscopy instrument able to cover the 80 kpc$\times$55 kpc (3.8'$\times$2.6') large nebula in NGC 1275. Our analysis of these observations shows a smooth radial gradient of the [N II]$\lambda$6583/$\text{H} \alpha$ line ratio, suggesting a change in the ionization mechanism and source across the nebula, while the dispersion profile shows a general decrease with increasing distance from the AGN at up to $\sim 10$ kpc. The velocity map shows no visible general trend or rotation, indicating that filaments are not falling uniformly onto the galaxy, nor being pulled out from it. Comparison between the physical properties of the filaments and Hitomi measurements of the X-ray gas dynamics in Perseus are also explored.
  • We seek to derive star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses (M_star) in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of IR emission originating from dust. We build a sample of galaxies with z>1, all observed from the UV to the IR (rest frame). The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different SFHs are introduced. We define different set of data, with or without a good sampling of the UV range, NIR, and thermal IR data. The impact of these different cases on the determination of M_star and SFR are analysed. Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population z ~8 cannot fit the data correctly. The other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As long as one measurement of the dust emission continuum is available, SFR are robustly estimated whatever the chosen model is, including standard recipes. M_star measurement is more subject to uncertainty, depending on the chosen model and the presence of NIR data, with an impact on the SFR-M_star scatter plot. Conversely, when thermal IR data from dust emission are missing, the uncertainty on SFR measurements largely exceeds that of stellar mass. Among all physical properties investigated here, the stellar ages are found to be the most difficult to constrain and this uncertainty acts as a second parameter in SFR measurements and as the most important parameter for M_star measurements.
  • Models of galaxy evolution assume some connection between the AGN and star formation activity in galaxies. We use the multi-wavelength information of the CDFS to assess this issue. We select the AGNs from the 3Ms XMM-Newton survey and measure the star-formation rates of their hosts using data that probe rest-frame wavelengths longward of 20 um. Star-formation rates are obtained from spectral energy distribution fits, identifying and subtracting an AGN component. We divide the star-formation rates by the stellar masses of the hosts to derive specific star-formation rates (sSFR) and find evidence for a positive correlation between the AGN activity (proxied by the X-ray luminosity) and the sSFR for the most active systems with X-ray luminosities exceeding Lx=10^43 erg/s and redshifts z~1. We do not find evidence for such a correlation for lower luminosity systems or those at lower redshifts. We do not find any correlation between the SFR (or the sSFR) and the X-ray absorption derived from high-quality XMM-Newton spectra either, showing that the absorption is likely to be linked to the nuclear region rather than the host, while the star-formation is not nuclear. Comparing the sSFR of the hosts to the characteristic sSFR of star-forming galaxies at the same redshift we find that the AGNs reside mostly in main-sequence and starburst hosts, reflecting the AGN - sSFR connection. Limiting our analysis to the highest X-ray luminosity AGNs (X-ray QSOs with Lx>10^44 erg/s), we find that the highest-redshift QSOs (with z>2) reside predominantly in starburst hosts, with an average sSFR more than double that of the "main sequence", and we find a few cases of QSOs at z~1.5 with specific star-formation rates compatible with the main-sequence, or even in the "quiescent" region. (abridged)
  • We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 {\mu}m by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth {\tau} = ({\nu}/{\nu}0)^{\beta} where {\beta} = +1.8 and {\nu}0 = c/100 {\mu}m. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (< |z| >= 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (< |z| >= 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z > 3 when compared to ~ 850 {\mu}m selected samples.
  • We report the results of the counterpart identification and a detailed analysis of the physical properties of the 48 sources discovered in our deep 1.1mm wavelength imaging survey of the GOODS-South field using the AzTEC instrument on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). One or more robust or tentative counterpart candidate is found for 27 and 14 AzTEC sources, respectively, by employing deep radio continuum, Spitzer MIPS & IRAC, and LABOCA 870 micron data. Five of the sources (10%) have two robust counterparts each, supporting the idea that these galaxies are strongly clustered and/or heavily confused. Photometric redshifts and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived by analyzing UV-to-optical and IR-to-radio SEDs. The median redshift of z~2.6 is similar to other earlier estimates, but we show that 80% of the AzTEC-GOODS sources are at z>2, with a significant high redshift tail (20% at z>3.3). Rest-frame UV and optical properties of AzTEC sources are extremely diverse, spanning 10 magnitude in the i- and K-band photometry with median values of i=25.3 and K=22.6 and a broad range of red colour (i-K=0-6). These AzTEC sources are some of the most luminous galaxies in the rest-frame optical bands at z>2, with inferred stellar masses of (1-30) x 10^{10} solar masses and UV-derived star formation rates of SFR(UV) > 10-1000 solar masses per year. The IR-derived SFR, 200-2000 solar masses per year, is independent of redshift or stellar mass. The resulting specific star formation rates, SSFR = 1-100 per Gyr, are 10-100 times higher than similar mass galaxies at z=0, and they extend the previously observed rapid rise in the SSFR with redshift to z=2-5. These galaxies have a SFR high enough to have built up their entire stellar mass within their Hubble time. We find only marginal evidence for an AGN contribution to the near-IR and mid-IR SEDs. (abridged)
  • Using extremely deep PACS 100- and 160um Herschel data from the GOODS-Herschel program, we identify 21 infrared bright galaxies previously missed in the deepest 24um surveys performed by MIPS. These MIPS dropouts are predominantly found in two redshift bins, centred at z ~0.4 and ~1.3. Their S_100/S_24 flux density ratios are similar to those of local LIRGs and ULIRGs, whose silicate absorption features at 18um (at z ~ 0.4) and 9.7um (at z ~ 1.3) are shifted into the 24um MIPS band at these redshifts. The high-z sub-sample consists of 11 infrared luminous sources, accounting for ~2% of the whole GOODS-Herschel sample and putting strong upper limits on the fraction of LIRGs/ULIRGs at 1.0<z<1.7 that are missed by the 24um surveys. We find that a S_100/S_24 > 43 colour cut selects galaxies with a redshift distribution similar to that of the MIPS dropouts and when combined with a second colour cut, S_16/S_8 > 4, isolates sources at 1.0 < z < 1.7. We show that these sources have elevated specific star formation rates (sSFR) compared to main sequence galaxies at these redshifts and are likely to be compact starbursts with moderate/strong 9.7um silicate absorption features in their mid-IR spectra. Herschel data reveal that their infrared luminosities extrapolated from the 24um flux density are underestimated, on average, by a factor of ~3. These silicate break galaxies account for 16% (8%) of the ULIRG (LIRG) population in the GOODS fields, indicating a lower limit in their space density of 2.0 \times 10^(-5) Mpc^(-3). Finally, we provide estimates of the fraction of z < 2 MIPS dropout sources as a function of the 24-, 100-, 160-, 250- and 350um sensitivity limits, and conclude that previous predictions of a population of silicate break galaxies missed by the major 24um extragalactic surveys have been overestimated.
  • We take advantage of the sensitivity and resolution of Herschel at 100 and 160 micron to directly image the thermal dust emission and investigate the infrared luminosities, L(IR), and dust obscuration of typical star-forming (L*) galaxies at high redshift. Our sample consists of 146 UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts 1.5<z<2.6 in the GOODS-North field. Supplemented with deep Very Large Array (VLA) and Spitzer imaging, we construct median stacks at the positions of these galaxies at 24, 100, and 160 micron, and 1.4 GHz. The comparison between these stacked fluxes and a variety of dust templates and calibrations implies that typical star-forming galaxies with UV luminosities L(UV)>1e10 Lsun at z~2 are luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with a median L(IR)=(2.2+/-0.3)e11 Lsun. Typical galaxies at 1.5<z<2.6 have a median dust obscuration L(IR)/L(UV) = 7.1+/-1.1, which corresponds to a dust correction factor, required to recover the bolometric star formation rate (SFR) from the unobscured UV SFR, of 5.2+/-0.6. This result is similar to that inferred from previous investigations of the UV, H-alpha, 24 micron, radio, and X-ray properties of the same galaxies studied here. Stacking in bins of UV slope implies that L* galaxies with redder spectral slopes are also dustier, and that the correlation between UV slope and dustiness is similar to that found for local starburst galaxies. Hence, the rest-frame 30 and 50 micron fluxes validate on average the use of the local UV attenuation curve to recover the dust attenuation of typical star-forming galaxies at high redshift. In the simplest interpretation, the agreement between the local and high redshift UV attenuation curves suggests a similarity in the dust production and stellar and dust geometries of starburst galaxies over the last 10 billion years.
  • Dust attenuation curves in external galaxies are useful to study their dust properties as well as to interpret their intrinsic spectral energy distributions. In particular the presence or absence of a UV bump at 2175 A remains an open issue which has consequences on the interpretation of broad band colours of distant galaxies. We study the dust attenuation curve in the UV range at z >1. In particular we search for the presence of a UV bump. We use deep photometric data of the CDFS obtained with intermediate and broad band filters by the MUSYC project to sample the UV rest-frame of galaxies with 1<z <2. Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS data are used to measure the dust emission. 30 galaxies were selected with high S/N in all bands. Their SEDs from the UV to the far-IR are fitted using the CIGALE code and the characteristics of the dust attenuation curve are obtained. The mean dust attenuation curve we derive exhibits a UV bump at 2175A whose amplitude corresponds to 35 % (76%) that of the MW (LMC2 supershell) extinction curve. An analytical expression of the average attenuation curve is given, it is found slightly steeper than the Calzetti et al. one, although at a 1 sigma level. Our galaxy sample is used to study the derivation of the slopes of the UV continuum from broad band colours, including the GALEX FUV-NUV colour. Systematic errors induced by the presence of the bump are quantified. We compare dust attenuation factors measured with CIGALE to the slope of the UV continuum and find that there is a large scatter around the relation valid for local starbursts (0.7 mag). The uncertainties on the determination of the UV slope lead to an extra systematic error of the order of 0.3 to 0.7 mag on dust attenuation when a filter overlaps the UV bump.
  • We present deep {\it Spitzer} mid-infrared spectroscopy, along with 16, 24, 70, and 850\,$\micron$\ photometry, for 22 galaxies located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) field. The sample spans a redshift range of $0.6\la z \la 2.6$, 24~$\mu$m flux densities between $\sim$0.2$-$1.2 mJy, and consists of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), X-ray or optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), and optically faint ($z_{AB}>25$\,mag) sources. We find that infrared (IR; $8-1000~\micron$) luminosities derived by fitting local spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with 24~$\micron$ photometry alone are well matched to those when additional mid-infrared spectroscopic and longer wavelength photometric data is used for galaxies having $z\la1.4$ and 24~$\micron$-derived IR luminosities typically $\la 3\times 10^{12}~L_{\sun}$. However, for galaxies in the redshift range between $1.4\la z \la 2.6$, typically having 24~$\micron$-derived IR luminosities $\ga 3\times 10^{12}~L_{\sun}$, IR luminosities are overestimated by an average factor of $\sim$5 when SED fitting with 24~$\micron$ photometry alone. This result arises partly due to the fact that high redshift galaxies exhibit aromatic feature equivalent widths that are large compared to local galaxies of similar luminosities. Through a spectral decomposition of mid-infrared spectroscopic data, we are able to isolate the fraction of IR luminosity arising from an AGN as opposed to star formation activity. This fraction is only able to account for $\sim$30\% of the total IR luminosity among the entire sample.
  • We present the largest spectroscopic follow-up performed in SWIRE ELAIS-N1. We were able to determine redshifts for 289 extragalactic sources. The values of spectroscopic redshifts of the latter have been compared with the estimated values from our photometric redshift code with very good agreement between the two for both galaxies and quasars. Six of the quasars are hyperluminous infrared galaxies all of which are broad line AGN. We have performed emission line diagnostics for 30 sources in order to classify them into star-forming, Seyferts, composite and LINER and compare the results to the predictions from our SED template fitting methods and mid-IR selection methods.
  • Single molecule Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are used to infer the properties of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins. From the measured average FRET efficiency, <E>, the distance distribution P(R) is inferred by assuming that the DSE can be described as a polymer. The single parameter in the appropriate polymer model (Gaussian chain, Wormlike chain, or Self-avoiding walk) for P(R) is determined by equating the calculated and measured <E>. In order to assess the accuracy of this "standard procedure," we consider the generalized Rouse model (GRM), whose properties [<E> and P(R)] can be analytically computed, and the Molecular Transfer Model for protein L for which accurate simulations can be carried out as a function of guanadinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) concentration. Using the precisely computed <E> for the GRM and protein L, we infer P(R) using the standard procedure. We find that the mean end-to-end distance can be accurately inferred (less than 10% relative error) using <E> and polymer models for P(R). However, the value extracted for the radius of gyration (Rg) and the persistence length (lp) are less accurate. The relative error in the inferred R-g and lp, with respect to the exact values, can be as large as 25% at the highest GdmCl concentration. We propose a self-consistency test, requiring measurements of <E> by attaching dyes to different residues in the protein, to assess the validity of describing DSE using the Gaussian model. Application of the self-consistency test to the GRM shows that even for this simple model the Gaussian P(R) is inadequate. Analysis of experimental data of FRET efficiencies for the cold shock protein shows that at there are significant deviations in the DSE P(R) from the Gaussian model.
  • (abridged) We present deep Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy, along with 16, 24, 70, and 850um photometry, for 22 galaxies located in GOODS-N. The sample spans a redshift range of 0.6 < z < 2.6, 24um flux densities between ~0.2-1.2 mJy, and consists of SMGs, AGN, and optically faint (z_AB > 25) sources. We find that IR luminosities derived by fitting local SEDs with 24um photometry alone are well matched to those when additional mid-infrared spectroscopic and longer wavelength photometric data is used for galaxies having z < 1.4 and 24um-derived IR luminosities typically > 3x10^12 L_sun. However, for galaxies in the redshift range between 1.4 < z < 2.6, typically having 24um-derived IR luminosities > 3x10^12 L_sun, IR luminosities are overestimated by an average factor of ~5 when SED fitting with 24um photometry alone. This result arises partly due to the fact that high redshift galaxies exhibit PAH EQWs that are large compared to local galaxies of similar luminosities. Using improved estimates for the IR luminosities of these sources, we investigate whether their IR emission is found to be in excess relative to that expected based on extinction corrected UV SFRs, possibly suggesting the presence of an obscured AGN. Through a spectral decomposition of IRS spectroscopic data, we are able to isolate the fraction of IR luminosity arising from an AGN as opposed to star formation activity. This fraction is only ~30% of the total IR luminosity among the entire sample, on average. Of the sources identified as having mid-infrared excesses, half are accounted for by using proper bolometric corrections while half show the presence of obscured AGN. We do not find evidence for evolution in the FIR-radio correlation over this redshift range, although the SMGs have IR/radio ratios which are, on average, ~3 times lower than the nominal value.
  • We use extensive new observations of the very rich z ~ 0.4 cluster of galaxies A851 to examine the nature and origin of starburst galaxies in intermediate-redshift clusters. New HST observations, Spitzer photometry and ground-based spectroscopy cover most of a region of the cluster about 10 arcmin across, corresponding to a clustercentric radial distance of about 1.6 Mpc. This spatial coverage allows us to confirm the existence of a morphology-density relation within this cluster, and to identify several large, presumably infalling, subsystems. We confirm our previous conclusion that a very large fraction of the starforming galaxies in A851 have recently undergone starbursts. We argue that starbursts are mostly confined to two kinds of sites: infalling groups and the cluster center. At the cluster center it appears that infalling galaxies are undergoing major mergers, resulting in starbursts whose optical emission lines are completely buried beneath dust. The aftermath of this process appears to be proto-S0 galaxies devoid of star formation. In contrast, major mergers do not appear to be the cause of most of the starbursts in infalling groups, and fewer of these events result in the transformation of the galaxy into an S0. Some recent theoretical work provides possible explanations for these two distinct processes, but it is not clear whether they can operate with the very high efficiency needed to account for the very large starburst rate observed.
  • We present the serendipitous discovery of z=4.05 molecular gas CO emission lines with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer coincident with GN20 and GN20.2, two luminous submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North field (GOODS-N). These are among the most distant submillimeter-selected galaxies reliably identified through CO emission and also some of the most luminous known. In terms of CO to bolometric luminosities, stellar mass and star formation rates (SFRs), these newly discovered z>4 SMGs are similar to z~1.5-3 SMGs studied to date. These z~4 SMGs have much higher specific SFRs than typical B-band dropout Lyman break galaxies at the same redshift. The stellar mass-SFR correlation for normal galaxies does not seem to evolve much further, between z~2 and z~4. A significant z=4.05 spectroscopic redshift spike is observed in GOODS-N, and a strong spatial overdensity of B-band dropouts and IRAC selected z>3.5 galaxies appears to be centered on the GN20 and GN20.2 galaxies. This suggests a proto-cluster structure with total mass ~10^14 Msun. Using photometry at mid-IR, submm and radio wavelengths, we show that reliable photometric redshifts (Dz/(1+z)~0.1) can be derived for SMGs over 1<z<4. This new photometric redshift technique has been used to provide a first estimate of the space density of 3.5<z<6 hyper-luminous starburst galaxies, and to show that they contribute substantially to the SFR density at early epochs. Many of these high-redshift starbursts will be within reach of Herschel. We find that the radio to mid-IR flux density ratio can be used to select z>3.5 starbursts, regardless of their submm/mm emission [abridged].
  • We present detailed observations of a z~1.99 cluster of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), discovered as the strongest redshift spike in our entire survey of ~100 SMGs across 800 square arcmin. It is the largest blank-field SMG concentration currently known and has <0.01% chance of being drawn from the underlying selection function for SMGs. We have compared UV observations of galaxies at this redshift, where we find a much less dramatic overdensity, having an 11% chance of being drawn from its selection function. We use this z~1.99 overdensity to compare the biasing of UV- and submm-selected galaxies, and test whether SMGs could reside in less overdense environments, with their apparent clustering signal being dominated by highly active merger periods in modest mass structures. This impressively active formation phase in a low mass cluster is not something seen in simulations, although we propose a toy model using merger bias which could account for the bias seen in the SMGs. While enhanced buildup of stellar mass appears characteristic of other high-z galaxy clusters, neither the UV- nor submm-galaxies in this structure exhibit larger stellar masses than their field galaxy counterparts (although the excess of SMGs in the structure represents a larger volume-averaged stellar mass than the field). Our findings have strong implications for future surveys for high-z galaxies at long wavelengths such as SCUBA2 and Herschel. We suggest that since these surveys will select galaxies during their episodes of peak starbursts, they could probe a much wider range of environments than just the progenitors of rich clusters, revealing more completely the key events and stages in galaxy formation and assembly.
  • We have conducted a deep and uniform 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field with AzTEC on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Here we present the first results from this survey including maps, the source catalogue, and 1.1 mm number-counts. The results presented here were obtained from a 245 sq-arcmin region with near uniform coverage to a depth of 0.96-1.16 mJy/beam. Our robust catalogue contains 28 source candidates detected with S/N >= 3.75, only 1-2 of which are expected to be spurious detections. Of these source candidates, 8 are also detected by SCUBA at 850 um in regions where there is good overlap between the two surveys. The major advantage of our survey over that with SCUBA is the uniformity of coverage. We calculate number counts using two different techniques: the first using a frequentist parameter estimation, and the second using a Bayesian method. The two sets of results are in good agreement. We find that the 1.1 mm differential number counts are well described in the 2-6 mJy range by the functional form dN/dS = N' (S'/S) exp(-S/S') with fitted parameters S' = 1.25 +/-0.38 mJy and dN/dS = 300 +/- 90 per mJy per sq-deg at 3 mJy.
  • We study the forced rupture of adhesive contacts between monomers that are not covalently linked in a Rouse chain. When the applied force ($f$) to the chain end is less than the critical force for rupture ($f_c$), the {\it reversible} rupture process is coupled to the internal Rouse modes. If $f/f_{c}$$>$1 the rupture is {\it irreversible}. In both limits, the non-exponential distribution of contact lifetimes, which depends sensitively on the location of the contact, follows the double-exponential (Gumbel) distribution. When two contacts are well separated along the chain, the rate limiting step in the {\it sequential} rupture kinetics is the disruption of the contact that is in the chain interior. If the two contacts are close to each other, they cooperate to sustain the stress, which results in an ``all-or-none'' transition.
  • We present evidence for the existence of an IRAC excess in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of 5 galaxies at 0.6<z<0.9 and 1 galaxy at z=1.7. These 6 galaxies, located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey field (GOODS-N), are star forming since they present strong 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 um polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) lines in their Spitzer IRS mid-infrared spectra. We use a library of templates computed with PEGASE.2 to fit their multiwavelength photometry and derive their stellar continuum. Subtraction of the stellar continuum enables us to detect in 5 galaxies a significant excess in the IRAC band pass where the 3.3 um PAH is expected. We then assess if the physical origin of the IRAC excess is due to an obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) or warm dust emission. For one galaxy evidence of an obscured AGN is found, while the remaining four do not exhibit any significant AGN activity. Possible contamination by warm dust continuum of unknown origin as found in the Galactic diffuse emission is discussed. The properties of such a continuum would have to be different from the local Universe to explain the measured IRAC excess, but we cannot definitively rule out this possibility until its origin is understood. Assuming that the IRAC excess is dominated by the 3.3 um PAH feature, we find good agreement with the observed 11.3 um PAH line flux arising from the same C-H bending and stretching modes, consistent with model expectations. Finally, the IRAC excess appears to be correlated with the star-formation rate in the galaxies. Hence it could provide a powerful diagnostic for measuring dusty star formation in z>3 galaxies once the mid-infrared spectroscopic capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope become available.
  • We have obtained a position (at sub-arcsecond accuracy) of the submillimeter bright source GOODS 850-5 (also known as GN10) in the GOODS North field using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at 1.25 mm wavelengths (MM J123633+6214.1, flux density: S(1.25 mm)=5.0+-1.0 mJy). This source has no optical counterpart in deep ACS imaging down to a limiting magnitude of i(775)=28.4 mag and its position is coincident with the position found in recent sub-millimeter mapping obtained at the SMA (Wang et al. 2007). Using deep VLA imaging at 20 cm, we find a radio source (S(20 cm)=32.7+-4.3 microJy) at the same position that is significantly brighter than reported in Wang et al. The source is detected by Spitzer in IRAC as well as at 24 microns. We apply different photometric redshift estimators using measurements of the dusty, mid/far-infrared part of the SED and derive a redshift z~4. Given our detection in the millimeter and radio we consider a significantly higher redshift (e.g., z~6 Wang et al. 2007) unlikely. MM J123633+6214.1 alias GOODS 850-5 nevertheless constitutes a bright representative of the high-redshift tail of the submillimeter galaxy population that may contribute a significant fraction to the (sub)millimeter background.
  • We present the first detection of molecular gas cooling CO emission lines from ordinary massive galaxies at z=1.5. Two sources were observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, selected to lie in the mass-star formation rate correlation at their redshift, thus being representative of massive high-z galaxies. Both sources were detected with high confidence, yielding L'_CO~10^{10}K km/s pc^2. For one of the sources we find evidence for velocity shear, implying CO sizes of ~10 kpc. With an infrared luminosity of L_FIR~10^{12}L_sun, these disk-like galaxies are borderline ULIRGs but with star formation efficiency similar to that of local spirals, and an order of magnitude lower than that in submm galaxies. This suggests a CO to total gas conversion factor similar to local spirals, gas consumption timescales approaching 1 Gyr or longer and molecular gas masses reaching ~10^11 M_sun, comparable to or larger than the estimated stellar masses. These results support a major role of 'in situ' gas consumption over cosmological timescales and with relatively low star formation efficiency, analogous to that of local spiral disks, for the formation of today's most massive galaxies and their central black holes. Given the high space density of similar galaxies, ~10^{-4}/Mpc^3, this implies a widespread presence of gas rich galaxies in the early Universe, many of which might be within reach of detailed investigations of current and planned facilities.
  • Examining a sample of massive galaxies at 1.4<z<2.5 with K_{Vega}<22 from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we compare photometry from Spitzer at mid- and far-IR, to submillimeter, radio and rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, to test the agreement between different tracers of star formation rates (SFRs) and to explore the implications for galaxy assembly. For z~2 galaxies with moderate luminosities(L_{8um}<10^{11}L_sun), we find that the SFR can be estimated consistently from the multiwavelength data based on local luminosity correlations. However,20--30% of massive galaxies, and nearly all those with L_{8um}>10^{11}L_sun, show a mid-IR excess which is likely due to the presence of obscured active nuclei, as shown in a companion paper. There is a tight and roughly linear correlation between stellar mass and SFR for 24um-detected galaxies. For a given mass, the SFR at z=2 was larger by a factor of ~4 and ~30 relative to that in star forming galaxies at z=1 and z=0, respectively. Typical ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z=2 are relatively 'transparent' to ultraviolet light, and their activity is long lived (~400 Myr), unlike that in local ULIRGs and high redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies. ULIRGs are the common mode of star formation in massive galaxies at z=2, and the high duty cycle suggests that major mergers are not the dominant trigger for this activity.Current galaxy formation models underpredict the normalization of the mass-SFR correlation by about a factor of 4, and the space density of ULIRGs by an orderof magnitude, but give better agreement for z>1.4 quiescent galaxies.
  • Approximately 20-30% of 1.4<z<2.5 galaxies with K<22 (Vega) detected with Spitzer MIPS at 24um show excess mid-IR emission relative to that expected based on the rates of star formation measured from other multiwavelength data.These galaxies also display some near-IR excess in Spitzer IRAC data, with a spectral energy distribution peaking longward of 1.6um in the rest frame, indicating the presence of warm-dust emission usually absent in star forming galaxies. Stacking Chandra data for the mid-IR excess galaxies yields a significant hard X-ray detection at rest-frame energies >6.2 keV. The stacked X-ray spectrum rises steeply at >10 keV, suggesting that these sources host Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) with column densities N_H~10^{24} cm^-2 and an average, unobscured X-ray luminosity L_{2-8 keV}~(1-4)x10^43 erg/s. Their sky density(~3200 deg^-2) and space density (~2.6x10^-4 Mpc^-3) are twice those of X-ray detected AGNs at z~2, and much larger than those of previously-known Compton thick sources at similar redshifts. The mid-IR excess galaxies are part of the long sought-after population of distant heavily obscured AGNs predicted by synthesis models of the X-ray background. The fraction of mid-IR excess objects increases with galaxy mass, reaching ~50-60% for M~10^11 M_sun, an effect likely connected with downsizing in galaxy formation. The ratio of theinferred black hole growth rate from these Compton-thick sources to the global star formation rate at z=2 is similar to the mass ratio of black holes to stars inlocal spheroids, implying concurrent growth of both within the precursors oftoday's massive galaxies.
  • We report on a preliminary study concerning the origin of radio emission within radio galaxies at L(1.4GHz)>1E24 W/Hz in the GOODS-N field. In the local universe, Condon et al. (2002) and Yun et al. (2001) have shown that in galaxies with radio luminosities greater than 1E23 W/Hz the majority of the radio emission originates from a `monster' i.e., an AGN. Using the Chandra 2Msec X-ray image centered on the GOODS-N field and a reprocessed VLA HDF A-array data plus newly acquired VLA B-array data (rms=5.3microJy), we find that radio galaxies (with spectroscopic redshifts; all have z>1) with L(1.4GHz)>1E24 W/Hz typically have an X-ray detection rate of 72% (60% emit hard X-rays suggesting an AGN origin for the radio emission) in contrast to 25% for radio galaxies with L < 1E23 W/Hz. The ACS images of these L(1.4 GHz) > 1E24 W/Hz galaxies typically show compact rather than extended galaxy morphology which is generally found for the less luminous radio emitting galaxies but a few appear to be ongoing galaxy mergers. We also present SED fitting for these luminous radio galaxies including Spitzer IRAC & MIPS 24um photometry and 60% show distinct power-law SED indicative of an AGN. Initial results tell us that the X-ray emitting radio galaxy population are generally not submm sources but the few (~10%) that are SCUBA sources appear to be the small AGN population found by Pope et al. and others.
  • We present evidence that the mid infrared (MIR) is a good tracer of the total infrared luminosity, L(IR), and star formation rate (SFR), of galaxies up to z 1.3. We use deep MIR images from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Spitzer Space Telescope in the Northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS-N) together with VLA radio data to compute three independant estimates of L(IR). The L(IR,MIR) derived from the observed 15 and/or 24 um flux densities using a library of template SEDs, and L(IR,radio), derived from the radio (1.4 and/or 8.5 GHz) using the radio-far infrared correlation, agree with a 1-sigma dispersion of 40 %. We use the k-correction as a tool to probe different parts of the MIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of galaxies as a function of their redshift and find that on average distant galaxies present MIR SEDs very similar to local ones. However, in the redshift range z= 0.4-1.2, L(IR,24um) is in better agreement with L(IR,radio) than L(IR,15 um) by 20 %, suggesting that the warm dust continuum is a better tracer of the SFR than the broad emission features due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We find marginal evidence for an evolution with redshift of the MIR SEDs: two thirds of the distant galaxies exhibit rest-frame MIR colors (L(12 um)/L(7 um) and L(10 um)/L(15 um) luminosity ratios) below the median value measured for local galaxies. Possible explanations are examined but these results are not sufficient to constrain the physics of the emitting regions. We compare three commonly used SED libraries which reproduce the color-luminosity correlations of local galaxies with our data and discuss possible refinements to the relative intensities of PAHs, warm dust continuum and silicate absorption.
  • We investigate the multi-wavelength emission of BzK selected star forming galaxies at z~2 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North region. Most (82%) of the sources are individually detected at 24um in the Spitzer MIPS imaging, and one fourth (26%) in the VLA radio data. Significant detections of the individually undetected objects are obtained through stacking in the radio, submm and X-ray domains. The typical star forming galaxy with stellar mass ~10^{11}Mo at z=2 is an Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG), with L_IR ~ 1-2x10^{12}Lo and star formation rate SFR 200-300Mo/yr, implying a comoving density of ULIRGs at z=2 at least 3 orders of magnitude above the local one. SFRs derived from the reddening corrected UV luminosities agree well, on average, with the longer wavelength estimates. The high 24um detection rate suggests a relatively large duty cycle for the BzK star forming phase, consistently with the available independent measurements of the space density of passively evolving galaxies at z>1.4. If the IMF at z=2 is similar to the local one, and in particular is not a top-heavy IMF, this suggests that a substantial fraction of the high mass tail (>10^{11}Mo) of the galaxy stellar mass function was completed by z~1.4.