• Ultraluminous x-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies shine brighter than any X-ray source in our Galaxy. ULXs are usually modeled as stellar-mass black holes (BHs) accreting at very high rates or intermediate-mass BHs. We present observations showing that NGC5907 ULX is instead an x-ray accreting neutron star (NS) with a spin period evolving from 1.43~s in 2003 to 1.13~s in 2014. It has an isotropic peak luminosity of about 1000 times the Eddington limit for a NS at 17.1~Mpc. Standard accretion models fail to explain its luminosity, even assuming beamed emission, but a strong multipolar magnetic field can describe its properties. These findings suggest that other extreme ULXs (x-ray luminosity > 10^{41} erg/s) might harbor NSs.
  • The EXTraS project to explore the X-ray Transient and variable Sky searches for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton. XMM-Newton performed more than 400 pointed observations in the region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We inspected the results of the EXTraS period search to systematically look for new X-ray pulsators in our neighbour galaxy. We analysed the XMM-Newton observations of two sources from the 3XMM catalogue which show significant signals for coherent pulsations. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 was detected as source with hard X-ray spectrum in two XMM-Newton observations, revealing a periodic modulation of the X-ray flux with 956~s. As optical counterpart we identify an early-type star with Halpha emission. The OGLE I-band light curve exhibits a regular pattern with three brightness dips which mark a period of ~1350 d. The X-ray spectrum of 3XMM J051034.6-670353 is dominated by a super-soft blackbody-like emission component (kT ~ 70 eV) which is modulated by nearly 100% with a period of ~1418 s. From GROND observations we suggest a star with r' = 20.9 mag as possible counterpart of the X-ray source. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 is confirmed as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discuss the long-term optical period as likely orbital period which would be the longest known from a high-mass X-ray binary. The spectral and temporal properties of the super-soft source 3XMM J051034.6-670353 are very similar to those of RX J0806.3+1527 and RX J1914.4+2456 suggesting that it belongs to the class of double-degenerate polars and is located in our Galaxy rather than in the LMC.
  • During a search for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton, we discovered a modulation at 1.2 s in 3XMM J004301.4+413017 (3X J0043), a source lying in the direction of an external arm of M 31. This short period indicates a neutron star (NS). Between 2000 and 2013, the position of 3X J0043 was imaged by public XMM-Newton observations 35 times. The analysis of these data allowed us to detect an orbital modulation at 1.27 d and study the long-term properties of the source. The emission of the pulsar was rather hard (most spectra are described by a power law with $\Gamma < 1$) and, assuming the distance to M 31, the 0.3-10 keV luminosity was variable, from $\sim$$3\times10^{37}$ to $2\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The analysis of optical data shows that, while 3X J0043 is likely associated to a globular cluster in M 31, a counterpart with $V\gtrsim22$ outside the cluster cannot be excluded. Considering our findings, there are two main viable scenarios for 3X J0043: a peculiar low-mass X-ray binary, similar to 4U 1822-37 or 4U 1626-67, or an intermediate-mass X-ray binary resembling Her X-1. Regardless of the exact nature of the system, 3X J0043 is the first accreting NS in M 31 in which the spin period has been detected.
  • We report on the results of the first XMM-Newton satellite observation of the luminous and helium-rich O-type subdwarf BD +37{\deg} 1977 carried out in April 2014. X-ray emission is detected with a flux of about 4*10^(-14) erg/cm2/s (0.2-1.5 keV), corresponding to a f_X/f_bol ratio about 10^(-7); the source spectrum is very soft, and is well fit by the sum of two plasma components at different temperatures. Both characteristics are in agreement with what is observed in the main-sequence early-type stars, where the observed X-ray emission is due to turbulence and shocks in the stellar wind. A smaller but still significant stellar wind has been observed also in BD +37{\deg} 1977; therefore, we suggest that also in this case the detected X-ray flux has the same origin.
  • Many of the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXRBs) discovered in recent years in our Galaxy are characterized by a high absorption, most likely intrinsic to the system, which hampers their detection at the softest X-ray energies. We have undertaken a search for highly-absorbed X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a systematic analysis of 62 XMM-Newton SMC observations. We obtained a sample of 30 sources showing evidence for an equivalent hydrogen column density larger than 3x10^23 cm^-2. Five of these sources are clearly identified as HMXRBs: four were already known (including three X-ray pulsars) and one, XMM J005605.8-720012, reported here for the first time. For the latter, we present optical spectroscopy confirming the association with a Be star in the SMC. The other sources in our sample have optical counterparts fainter than magnitude ~16 in the V band, and many of them have possible NIR counterparts consistent with highly reddened early type stars in the SMC. While their number is broadly consistent with the expected population of background highly-absorbed active galactic nuclei, a few of them could be HMXRBs in which an early type companion is severely reddened by local material.
  • On 2008 May 14, the Burst Alert Telescope aboard the Swift mission triggered on a type-I X-ray burst from the previously unclassified ROSAT object 1RXH J173523.7-354013, establishing the source as a neutron star X-ray binary. We report on X-ray, optical and near-infrared observations of this system. The X-ray burst had a duration of ~2 h and belongs to the class of rare, intermediately long type-I X-ray bursts. From the bolometric peak flux of ~3.5E-8 erg/cm^2/s, we infer a source distance of D<9.5 kpc. Photometry of the field reveals an optical counterpart that declined from R=15.9 during the X-ray burst to R=18.9 thereafter. Analysis of post-burst Swift/XRT observations, as well as archival XMM-Newton and ROSAT data suggests that the system is persistent at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of ~2E35 (D/9.5 kpc)^2 erg/s. Optical and infrared photometry together with the detection of a narrow Halpha emission line (FWHM=292+/-9 km/s, EW=-9.0+/-0.4 Angstrom) in the optical spectrum confirms that 1RXH J173523.7-354013 is a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The Halpha emission demonstrates that the donor star is hydrogen-rich, which effectively rules out that this system is an ultra-compact X-ray binary.
  • GRB 090709A is a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) discovered by Swift, featuring a bright X-ray afterglow as well as a faint infrared transient with very red and peculiar colors. The burst attracted a large interest because of a possible quasi-periodicity at P=8.1 s in the prompt emission, suggesting that it could have a different origin with respect to standard, long GRBs. In order to understand the nature of this burst, we obtained a target of opportunity observation with XMM-Newton. X-ray spectroscopy, based on XMM-Newton and Swift data, allowed us to model the significant excess in photoelectric absorption with respect to the Galactic value as due to a large column density (about 6.5E+22 cm^-2) in the GRB host, located at z=4.2. Such a picture is also consistent with the infrared transient's properties. Re-analysis of the prompt emission, based on INTEGRAL and on Swift data, excludes any significant modulation at P=8.1 s. Thus, we conclude that GRB 090709A is a distant, standard, long GRB.
  • The radio-quiet neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 has been the target of several XMM-Newton observations, with a total exposure of ~350 ks. The source is located at intermediate galactic latitude (b~10 degrees), i.e. in a sky region with an extremely interesting mix of both galactic and extra-galactic X-ray sources. The aim of our work is to investigate the properties of both the intermediate-latitude galactic and extra-galactic X-ray source populations in the 1E1207.4-5209 field. We performed a coherent analysis of the whole XMM-Newton observation data set to build a catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources detected with high confidence and to derive information on the source flux, spectra, and time variability. In addition, we performed a complete multi-band (UBVRI) optical coverage of the field with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) of the ESO/MPG 2.2m telescope (La Silla) to search for candidate optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, down to a V-band limiting magnitude of ~24.5. We detected a total of 144 serendipitous X-ray sources. Thanks to the refined X-ray positions and to the WFI observations, we found candidate optical counterparts for most of the X-ray sources in our compilation. For most of the brightest ones we proposed a likely classification based on both the X-ray spectra and the optical colours. Our results indicate that at intermediate galactic latitude the X-ray source population is dominated by the extra-galactic component, but with a significant contribution from the galactic component in the soft energy band, below 2 keV.
  • [Abridged] We report on a multiwavelength observation of the blazar 3C 454.3 (which we dubbed "crazy diamond") carried out on November 2007 by means of the astrophysical satellites AGILE, INTEGRAL, Swift, the WEBT Consortium, and the optical-NIR telescope REM. 3C 454.3 is detected at a $\sim 19-\sigma$ level during the 3-week observing period, with an average flux above 100 MeV of $F_{\rm E>100MeV} = (170 \pm 13) \times 10^{-8}$ \phcmsec. The gamma-ray spectrum can be fit with a single power-law with photon index $\Gamma_{\rm GRID} = 1.73 \pm 0.16$ between 100 MeV and 1 GeV. We detect significant day-by-day variability of the gamma-ray emission during our observations, and we can exclude that the fluxes are constant at the 99.6% ($\sim 2.9 \sigma$) level. The source was detected typically around 40 degrees off-axis, and it was substantially off--axis in the field of view of the AGILE hard X-ray imager. However, a 5-day long ToO observation by INTEGRAL detected 3C 454.3 at an average flux of about $F_{\rm 20-200 keV} = 1.49 \times 10^{-3}$ \phcmsec with an average photon index of $\Gamma_{\rm IBIS} = 1.75 \pm 0.24$ between 20--200 keV. Swift also detected 3C 454.3 with a flux in the 0.3--10 keV energy band in the range $(1.23-1.40) \times 10^{-2}$ \phcmsec{} and a photon index in the range $\Gamma_{\rm XRT} = 1.56-1.73$. In the optical band, both WEBT and REM show an extremely variable behavior in the $R$ band. A correlation analysis based on the entire data set is consistent with no time-lags between the gamma-ray and the optical flux variations. Our simultaneous multifrequency observations strongly indicate that the dominant emission mechanism between 30 MeV and 30 GeV is dominated by inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons in the jet on the external photons from the broad line region.
  • While waiting for new gamma-ray burst detections, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift covers each day ~50% of the sky in the hard X-ray band (``Survey data''). The large field of view (FOV), high sensitivity and good angular resolution make BAT a potentially powerful all-sky hard X-ray monitor, provided that mask--related systematics can be properly accounted for. We have developed and tested a complete procedure entirely based on public Swift/BAT software tools to analyse BAT Survey data, aimed at assessing the flux and spectral variability of bright sources in the 15-150 keV energy range. Detailed tests of the capabilities of our procedure were performed focusing, in particular, on the reliability of spectral measurements over the entire BAT FOV. First, we analyzed a large set of Crab observations, spread over ~7 months. Next, we studied the case of GRO J1655-40, a strongly variable source, which experienced a 9-month long outburst, beginning on February 2005. Such an outburst was systematically monitored with the well-calibrated PCA and HEXTE instruments on board the RXTE mission. Thanks to the good BAT temporal coverage of the source, we have been able to cross-check BAT light-curves with simultaneous HEXTE ones. The Crab tests have shown that our procedure recovers both the flux and the source spectral shape over the whole FOV of the BAT instrument. Moreover, by cross-checking GRO J1655-40 light-curves obtained by BAT and HEXTE, we found the spectral and flux evolution of the outburst to be in very good agreement. Using our procedure, BAT reproduces HEXTE fluxes within a 10-15% uncertainty with a 3sigma sensitivity of ~20 mCrab for an on-axis source, thus establishing its capability to monitor the evolution of relatively bright hard X-rays sources.
  • RS Ophiuchi began its latest outburst on 2006 February 12. Previous outbursts have indicated that high velocity ejecta interact with a pre-existing red giant wind, setting up shock systems analogous to those seen in Supernova Remnants. However, in the previous outburst in 1985, X-ray observations did not commence until 55 days after the initial explosion. Here we report on Swift observations covering the first month of the 2006 outburst with the Burst Alert (BAT) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) instruments. RS Oph was clearly detected in the BAT 14-25 keV band from t=0 to $t\sim6$ days. XRT observationsfrom 0.3-10 keV, started at 3.17 days after outburst. The rapidly evolving XRT spectra clearly show the presence of both line and continuum emission which can be fitted by thermal emission from hot gas whose characteristic temperature, overlying absorbing column, $[N_H]_W$, and resulting unabsorbed total flux decline monotonically after the first few days. Derived shock velocities are in good agreement with those found from observations at other wavelengths. Similarly, $[N_H]_W$ is in accord with that expected from the red giant wind ahead of the forward shock. We confirm the basic models of the 1985 outburst and conclude that standard Phase I remnant evolution terminated by $t\sim10$ days and the remnant then rapidly evolved to display behaviour characteristic of Phase III. Around t=26 days however, a new, luminous and highly variable soft X-ray source began to appear whose origin will be explored in a subsequent paper.
  • The radio quiet neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 has been the target of a 260 ks XMM-Newton observation, which yielded, as a by product, an harvest of about 200 serendipitous X-ray sources above a limiting flux of 2E-15 erg/cm2/s, in the 0.3-8 keV energy range. In view of the intermediate latitude of our field (b~10 deg), it comes as no surprise that the logN-logS distribution of our serendipitous sources is different from those measured either in the Galactic Plane or at high galactic latitudes. Here we shall concentrate on the analysis of the brightest sources in our sample, which unveiled a previously unknown Seyfert-2 galaxy.