• The parameter A+, defined as the area enclosed between the cumulative radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs) and that of a reference population, is a powerful indicator of the level of BSS central segregation. As part of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), here we present the BSS population and the determination of A+ in 27 GCs observed out to about one half-mass radius. In combination with 21 additional clusters discussed in a previous paper this provides us with a global sample of 48 systems (corresponding to \sim 32\% of the Milky Way GC population), for which we find a strong correlation between A+ and the ratio of cluster age to the current central relaxation time. Tight relations have been found also with the core radius and the central luminosity density, which are expected to change with the long-term cluster dynamical evolution. An interesting relation is emerging between A+ and the ratio of the BSS velocity dispersion relative to that of main sequence turn-off stars, which measures the degree of energy equipartition experienced by BSSs in the cluster. These results provide further confirmation that BSSs are invaluable probes of GC internal dynamics and A+ is a powerful dynamical clock.
  • Stellar activity is the ultimate source of radial-velocity (RV) noise in the search for Earth-mass planets orbiting late-type main-sequence stars. We analyse the performance of four different indicators and the chromospheric index $\log R'_{\rm HK}$ in detecting RV variations induced by stellar activity in 15 slowly rotating ($v\sin i \leq 5$ km/s), weakly active ($\log R'_{\rm HK} \leq -4.95$) solar-like stars observed with the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N. We consider indicators of the asymmetry of the cross-correlation function (CCF) between the stellar spectrum and the binary weighted line mask used to compute the RV, that is the bisector inverse span (BIS), $\Delta V$, and a new indicator $V_{\rm asy(mod)}$ together with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the CCF. We present methods to evaluate the uncertainties of the CCF indicators and apply a kernel regression (KR) between the RV, the time, and each of the indicators to study their capability of reproducing the RV variations induced by stellar activity. The considered indicators together with the KR prove to be useful to detect activity-induced RV variations in $47 \pm 18$ percent of the stars over a two-year time span when a significance (two-sided p-value) threshold of one percent is adopted. In those cases, KR reduces the standard deviation of the RV time series by a factor of approximately two. The BIS, the FWHM, and the newly introduced $V_{\rm asy(mod)}$ are the best indicators, being useful in $27 \pm 13$, $13 \pm 9$, and $13 \pm 9$ percent of the cases, respectively. The relatively limited performances of the activity indicators are related to the very low activity level and $v\sin i$ of the considered stars. For the application of our approach to sun-like stars, a spectral resolution of at least $10^5$ and highly stabilized spectrographs are recommended.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope photometric survey of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) has revealed a peculiar "chromosome map" for NGC6934. Besides a typical sequence, similar to that observed in Type I GCs, NGC 6934 displays additional stars on the red side, analogous to the anomalous, Type II GCs, as defined in our previous work. We present a chemical abundance analysis of four red giants in this GC. Two stars are located on the chromosome map sequence common to all GCs, and another two on the additional sequence. We find: (i) star-to-star Fe variations, with the two anomalous stars being enriched by ~0.2 dex. Due to our small-size sample, this difference is at the ~2.5 sigma level; (ii) no evidence for variations in the slow neutron-capture abundances over Fe, at odds with what is often observed in anomalous Type II GCs, e.g. M 22 and Omega Centauri; (iii) no large variations in light elements C, O and Na, compatible with the targets location on the lower part of the chromosome map where such variations are not expected. Since the analyzed stars are homogeneous in light elements, the only way to reproduce the photometric splits on the sub-giant (SGB) and the red-giant (RGB) branches is to assume that red-RGB/faint-SGB stars are enhanced in [Fe/H] by ~0.2. This fact corroborates the spectroscopic evidence of a metallicity variation in NGC6934. The observed chemical pattern resembles only partially the other Type II GCs, suggesting that NGC6934 might belong either to a third class of GCs, or be a link between normal Type I and anomalous Type II GCs.
  • We present 20 years of radial velocity (RV) measurements of the M1 dwarf Gl15A, combining 5 years of intensive RV monitoring with the HARPS-N spectrograph with 15 years of archival HIRES/Keck RV data. We carry out an MCMC-based analysis of the RV time series, inclusive of Gaussian Process (GP) approach to the description of stellar activity induced RV variations. Our analysis confirms the Keplerian nature and refines the orbital solution for the 11.44-day period super Earth, Gl15A\,b, reducing its amplitude to $1.68^{+0.17}_{-0.18}$ m s$^{-1}$ ($M \sin i = 3.03^{+0.46}_{-0.44}$ M$_\oplus$), and successfully models a long-term trend in the combined RV dataset in terms of a Keplerian orbit with a period around 7600 days and an amplitude of $2.5^{+1.3}_{-1.0}$ m s$^{-1}$, corresponding to a super-Neptune mass ($M \sin i = 36^{+25}_{-18}$ M$_\oplus$) planetary companion. We also discuss the present orbital configuration of Gl15A planetary system in terms of the possible outcomes of Lidov-Kozai interactions with the wide-separation companion Gl15B in a suite of detailed numerical simulations. In order to improve the results of the dynamical analysis, we derive a new orbital solution for the binary system, combining our RV measurements with astrometric data from the WDS catalogue. The eccentric Lidov-Kozai analysis shows the strong influence of Gl15B on the Gl15A planetary system, which can produce orbits compatible with the observed configuration for initial inclinations of the planetary system between $75^\circ$ and $90^\circ$, and can also enhance the eccentricity of the outer planet well above the observed value, even resulting in orbital instability, for inclinations around $0^\circ$ and $15^\circ - 30^\circ$. The Gl15A system is the multi-planet system closest to Earth, at $3.57$ pc, and hosts the longest period RV sub-jovian mass planet discovered so far.
  • We present the confirmation of a small, moderately-irradiated (F = 155 +/- 7 Fearth) Neptune with a substantial gas envelope in a P=11.8728787+/-0.0000085-day orbit about a quiet, Sun-like G0V star Kepler-1655. Based on our analysis of the Kepler light curve, we determined Kepler-1655b's radius to be 2.213+/-0.082 Rearth. We acquired 95 high-resolution spectra with TNG/HARPS-N, enabling us to characterize the host star and determine an accurate mass for Kepler-1655b of 5.0+3.1/-2.8 Mearth via Gaussian-process regression. Our mass determination excludes an Earth-like composition with 98\% confidence. Kepler-1655b falls on the upper edge of the evaporation valley, in the relatively sparsely occupied transition region between rocky and gas-rich planets. It is therefore part of a population of planets that we should actively seek to characterize further.
  • In the context of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs), we derived high-precision, multi-band photometry to investigate the multiple stellar populations in the massive and metal-poor GC M 15. By creating for red-giant branch (RGB) stars of the cluster a 'chromosome map', which is a pseudo two-colour diagram made with appropriate combination of F275W, F336W, F438W, and F814W magnitudes, we revealed colour spreads around two of the three already known stellar populations. These spreads cannot be produced by photometric errors alone and could hide the existence of (two) additional populations. This discovery increases the complexity of the multiple-population phenomenon in M 15. Our analysis shows that M 15 exhibits a faint sub-giant branch (SGB), which is also detected in colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) made with optical magnitudes only. This poorly-populated SGB includes about 5% of the total number of SGB stars and evolves into a red RGB in the m_F336W vs. m_F336W-m_F814W CMD, suggesting that M 15 belongs to the class of Type II GCs. We measured the relative number of stars in each population at various radial distances from the cluster centre, showing that all of these populations share the same radial distribution within statistic uncertainties. These new findings are discussed in the context of the formation and evolution scenarios of the multiple populations.
  • We characterised five transiting planetary systems (HAT-P-3, HAT-P-12, HAT-P-22, WASP-39 and WASP-60) and determined their sky-projected planet orbital obliquity through the measurement of the RM effect. We used HARPS-N high-precision radial velocity measurements, gathered during transit events, to measure the RM effect in the target systems and determine the sky-projected angle between the planetary orbital plane and the stellar equator. The characterisation of stellar atmospheric parameters was performed exploiting the HARPS-N spectra, using line equivalent width ratios, and spectral synthesis methods. Photometric parameters of the five transiting exoplanets were re-analysed through 17 new light curves, obtained with an array of medium-class telescopes, and other light curves from the literature. Survey-time-series photometric data were analysed for determining the rotation periods of the five stars and their spin inclination. From the analysis of the RM effect we derived a sky-projected obliquity of 21.2 degree, -54 degree, -2.1 degree, 0 degree and -129 degree for HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-22b, WASP-39b and WASP-60b, respectively. The latter value indicates that WASP-60b is moving on a retrograde orbit. These values represent the first measurements of \lambda for the five exoplanetary systems under study. The stellar activity of HAT-P-22 indicates a rotation period of 28.7 days, which allowed us to estimate the true misalignment angle of HAT-P-22b, \psi=24 degree. The revision of the physical parameters of the five exoplanetary systems returned values that are fully compatible with those existing in the literature. The exception to this is the WASP-60 system, for which, based on higher quality spectroscopic and photometric data, we found a more massive and younger star and a larger and hotter planet.
  • The split main sequences (MSs) and extended MS turnoffs (eMSTOs) detected in a few young clusters have demonstrated that these stellar systems host multiple populations differing in a number of properties such as rotation and, possibly, age.We analyze Hubble Space Telescope photometry for thirteen clusters with ages between ~40 and ~1000 Myrs and of different masses. Our goal is to investigate for the first time the occurrence of multiple populations in a large sample of young clusters. We find that all the clusters exhibit the eMSTO phenomenon and that MS stars more massive than ~1.6 solar masses define a blue and red MS, with the latter hosting the majority of MS stars. The comparison between the observations and isochrones suggests that the blue MSs are made of slow-rotating stars, while the red MSs host stars with rotational velocities close to the breakup value. About half of the bright MS stars in the youngest clusters are H-alpha emitters. These Be stars populate the red MS and the reddest part of the eMSTO thus supporting the idea that the red MS is made of fast rotators. We conclude that the split MS and the eMSTO are a common feature of young clusters in both Magellanic Clouds. The phenomena of a split MS and an eMSTO occur for stars that are more massive than a specific threshold which is independent of the host-cluster mass. As a by-product, we report the serendipitous discovery of a young SMC cluster, GALFOR1.
  • M-dwarf stars are promising targets for identifying and characterizing potentially habitable planets. K2-3 is a nearby (45 pc), early-type M dwarf hosting three small transiting planets, the outermost of which orbits close to the inner edge of the stellar (optimistic) habitable zone. The K2-3 system is well suited for follow-up characterization studies aimed at determining accurate masses and bulk densities of the three planets. Using a total of 329 radial velocity measurements collected over 2.5 years with the HARPS-N and HARPS spectrographs and a proper treatment of the stellar activity signal, we aim to improve measurements of the masses and bulk densities of the K2-3 planets. We use our results to investigate the physical structure of the planets. We analyse radial velocity time series extracted with two independent pipelines by using Gaussian process regression. We adopt a quasi-periodic kernel to model the stellar magnetic activity jointly with the planetary signals. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the robustness of our mass measurements of K2-3\,c and K2-3\,d, and to explore how additional high-cadence radial velocity observations might improve them. Despite the stellar activity component being the strongest signal present in the radial velocity time series, we are able to derive masses for both planet b ($M_{\rm b}=6.6\pm1.1$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$) and planet c ($M_{\rm c}=3.1^{+1.3}_{-1.2}$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$). The Doppler signal due to K2-3\,d remains undetected, likely because of its low amplitude compared to the radial velocity signal induced by the stellar activity. The closeness of the orbital period of K2-3\,d to the stellar rotation period could also make the detection of the planetary signal complicated. [...]
  • We present the star formation history (SFH) of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on deep archive $B$,$I$ photometry taken with Suprime-Cam at Subaru telescope focusing our analysis on the inner region of the galaxy, fully located within the core radius. Within the errors of our SFH we have not detected any metallicity gradient along the considered radial distance interval. As a main result of this work we can state that the Sextans dwarf spheroidal stopped forming stars less than $\sim1.3$ Gyr after Big Bang in correspondance to the end of the reionization epoch. We have been able to constrain the duration of the main burst of star formation to $\sim0.6$ Gyr. From the calculation of the mechanical luminosity released from supernovae (SNe) during the brief episode of star formation, there are strong indications that SNe could have played an important role in the fate of Sextans, by removing almost completely the gas component, so preventing a prolonged star formation.
  • As part of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters, 110 parallel fields were observed with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys, in the outskirts of 48 globular clusters, plus the open cluster NGC 6791. Totalling about $0.3$ square degrees of observed sky, this is the largest homogeneous Hubble Space Telescope photometric survey of Galalctic globular clusters outskirts to date. In particular, two distinct pointings have been obtained for each target on average, all centred at about $6.5$ arcmin from the cluster centre, thus covering a mean area of about $23\,{\rm arcmin^{2}}$ for each globular cluster. For each field, at least one exposure in both F475W and F814W filters was collected. In this work, we publicly release the astrometric and photometric catalogues and the astrometrised atlases for each of these fields.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters is providing a major breakthrough in our knowledge of Globular Clusters (GCs) and their stellar populations. Among the main results, we discovered that all the studied GCs host two main discrete groups consisting of first generation (1G) and second generation (2G) stars. We exploit the multiwavelength photometry from this project to investigate, for the first time, the Red Giant Branch Bump (RGBB) of the two generations in a large sample of GCs. We identified, with high statistical significance, the RGBB of 1G and 2G stars in 26 GCs and found that their magnitude separation as a function of the filter wavelength follows comparable trends. The comparison of observations to synthetic spectra reveals that the RGBB luminosity depends on the stellar chemical composition and that the 2G RGBB is consistent with stars enhanced in He and N and depleted in C and O with respect to 1G stars. For metal-poor GCs the 1G and 2G RGBB relative luminosity in optical bands mostly depends on helium content, Y. We used the RGBB observations in F606W and F814W bands to infer the relative helium abundance of 1G and 2G stars in 18 GCs, finding an average helium enhancement $\Delta$Y=0.011$\pm$0.002 of 2G stars with respect to 1G stars. This is the first determination of the average difference in helium abundance of multiple populations in a large number of clusters and provides a lower limit to the maximum internal variation of helium in GCs.
  • The GAPS programme is an Italian project aiming to search and characterize extra-solar planetary systems around stars with different characteristics (mass, metallicity, environment). GAPS was born in 2012, when single research groups joined in order to propose a long-term multi-purpose observing program for the exploitation of the extraordinary performances of the HARPS-N spectrograph, mounted at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Now this group is a concerted community in which wide range of expertise and capabilities are shared in order to reach a more important role in the wider international context. We present the results achieved up to now from the GAPS radial velocity survey: they were obtained in both the two main objectives of the project, the planet detection and the characterization of already known exoplanetary systems. With GAPS we detected, for instance, the first confirmed binary system in which both components host planets (Desidera et al. 2014), the first planetary system around a star in an open cluster (Malavolta et al. 2016), a system of Super-Earths orbiting an M-dwarf star (Affer et al. 2016).
  • Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
  • We carried out a Bayesian homogeneous determination of the orbital parameters of 231 transiting giant planets (TGPs) that are alone or have distant companions; we employed DE-MCMC methods to analyse radial-velocity (RV) data from the literature and 782 new high-accuracy RVs obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph for 45 systems over 3 years. Our work yields the largest sample of systems with a transiting giant exoplanet and coherently determined orbital, planetary, and stellar parameters. We found that the orbital parameters of TGPs in non-compact planetary systems are clearly shaped by tides raised by their host stars. Indeed, the most eccentric planets have relatively large orbital separations and/or high mass ratios, as expected from the equilibrium tide theory. This feature would be the outcome of high-eccentricity migration (HEM). The distribution of $\alpha=a/a_R$, where $a$ and $a_R$ are the semi-major axis and the Roche limit, for well-determined circular orbits peaks at 2.5; this also agrees with expectations from the HEM. The few planets of our sample with circular orbits and $\alpha >5$ values may have migrated through disc-planet interactions instead of HEM. By comparing circularisation times with stellar ages, we found that hot Jupiters with $a < 0.05$ au have modified tidal quality factors $10^{5} < Q'_p < 10^{9}$, and that stellar $Q'_s > 10^{6}-10^{7}$ are required to explain the presence of eccentric planets at the same orbital distance. As a by-product of our analysis, we detected a non-zero eccentricity for HAT-P-29; we determined that five planets that were previously regarded to have hints of non-zero eccentricity have circular orbits or undetermined eccentricities; we unveiled curvatures caused by distant companions in the RV time series of HAT-P-2, HAT-P-22, and HAT-P-29; and we revised the planetary parameters of CoRoT-1b.
  • Context. Identification of planetary companions of giant stars is made difficult because of the astrophysical noise, that may produce radial velocity (RV) variations similar to those induced by a companion. On the other hand any stellar signal is wavelength dependent, while signals due to a companion are achromatic. Aims. Our goal is to determine the origin of the Doppler periodic variations observed in the thick disk K giant star TYC 4282-605-1 by HARPS-N at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and verify if they can be due to the presence of a substellar companion. Methods. Several methods have been used to exclude the stellar origin of the observed signal including detailed analysis of activity indicators and bisector and the analysis of the photometric light curve. Finally we have conducted an observational campaign to monitor the near infrared (NIR) RV with GIANO at the TNG in order to verify whether the NIR amplitude variations are comparable with those observed in the visible. Results. Both optical and NIR RVs show consistent variations with a period at 101 days and similar amplitude, pointing to the presence of a companion orbiting the target. The main orbital properties obtained for our giant star with a derived mass of M=0.97+-0.03M_sun are M_Psini=10.78+-0.12MJ;P=101.54+-0.05days;e=0.28+-0.01 and a=0.422+-0.009AU. The chemical analysis shows a significant enrichment in the abundance of Nai, Mgi, Ali and S i while the rest of analyzed elements are consistent with the solar value demonstrating that the chemical composition corresponds with an old K giant (age = 10.1 Gyr) belonging to local thick disk. Conclusions. We conclude that the substellar companion hypothesis for this K giant is the best explanation for the observed periodic RV variation. This study also shows the high potential of multi-wavelength RV observations for the validation of planet candidates.
  • We take advantage of the exquisite quality of the Hubble Space Telescope 26-filter astro-photometric catalog of the core of Omega Cen presented in the first paper of this series and the empirical differential-reddening correction presented in the second paper in order to distill the main sequence into its constituent populations. To this end, we restrict ourselves to the five most useful filters: the magic "trio" of F275W, F336W, and F438W, along with F606W and F814W. We develop a strategy for identifying color systems where different populations stand out most distinctly, then we isolate those populations and examine them in other filters where their sub-populations also come to light. In this way, we have identified at least 15 sub-populations, each of which has a distinctive fiducial curve through our 5-dimensional photometric space. We confirm the MSa to be split into two subcomponents, and find that both the bMS and the rMS are split into three subcomponents. Moreover, we have discovered two additional MS groups: the MSd (which has three subcomponents) shares similar properties with the bMS, and the MSe (which has four subcomponents), has properties more similar to those of the rMS. We examine the fiducial curves together and use synthetic spectra to infer relative heavy-element, light-element, and Helium abundances for the populations. Our findings show that the stellar populations and star formation history of Omega Cen are even more complex than inferred previously. Finally, we provide as a supplement to the original catalog a list that identifies for each star which population it most likely is associated with.
  • We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of multiple populations along the asymptotic-giant branch (AGB) of the intermediate-metallicity globular clusters (GCs) NGC2808 and NGC6121 (M4). Chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ce in AGB stars from high-resolution FLAMES+UVES@VLT spectra are reported for both clusters. Our spectroscopic results have been combined with multi-wavelength photometry from the HST UV survey of Galactic GCs and ground-based photometry, plus proper motions derived by combining stellar positions from ground-based images and Gaia DR1. Our analysis reveals that the AGBs of both clusters host multiple populations with different chemical composition. In M4 we have identified two main populations of stars with different Na/O content, lying on distinct AGBs in the mF438W vs. C_F275W,F336W,F438W and the V vs.C_U,B,I pseudo-CMDs. In the more massive and complex GC NGC2808 three groups of stars with different chemical abundances occupy different locations on the so-called "chromosome map" photometric diagram. The spectroscopic+photometric comparison of stellar populations along the AGB and the red giants of this GC suggests that the AGB hosts stellar populations with a range in helium abundances spanning from primordial up to high contents of Y~0.32. On the other hand, from our dataset, there is no evidence for stars with extreme helium abundance (Y~0.38) on the AGB, suggesting that the most He-rich stars of NGC2808 do not reach this phase.
  • In the framework of the GAPS project, we are conducting an observational programme aimed at the determination of the orbital obliquity of known transiting exoplanets. The targets are selected to probe the obliquity against a wide range of stellar and planetary physical parameters. We exploit high-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements, delivered by the HARPS-N spectrograph at the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect in RV time-series bracketing planet transits, and to refine the orbital parameters determinations with out-of-transit RV data. We also analyse new transit light curves obtained with several 1-2m class telescopes to better constrain the physical fundamental parameters of the planets and parent stars. We report here on new transit spectroscopic observations for three very massive close-in giant planets: WASP43b, HATP20b and Qatar2b orbiting dwarf K-type stars with effective temperature well below 5000K. We find lambda = 3.5pm6.8 deg for WASP43b and lambda = -8.0pm6.9 deg for HATP20b, while for Qatar2, our faintest target, the RM effect is only marginally detected, though our best-fit value lambda = 15pm20 deg is in agreement with a previous determination. In combination with stellar rotational periods derived photometrically, we estimate the true spin-orbit angle, finding that WASP43b is aligned while the orbit of HATP20b presents a small but significant obliquity (Psi=36 _{-12}^{+10} deg). By analyzing the CaII H&K chromospheric emission lines for HATP20 and WASP43, we find evidence for an enhanced level of stellar activity which is possibly induced by star-planet interactions.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GO-13297) has been specifically designed to complement the existing F606W and F814W observations of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Globular Cluster Survey (GO-10775) by observing the most accessible 47 of the previous survey's 65 clusters in three WFC3/UVIS filters F275W, F336W, and F438W. The new survey also adds super-solar metallicity open cluster NGC 6791 to increase the metallicity diversity. The combined survey provides a homogeneous 5-band data set that can be used to pursue a broad range of scientific investigations. In particular, the chosen UV filters allow the identification of multiple stellar populations by targeting the regions of the spectrum that are sensitive to abundance variations in C, N, and O. In order to provide the community with uniform preliminary catalogs, we have devised an automated procedure that performs high-quality photometry on the new UV observations (along with similar observations of seven other programs in the archive). This procedure finds and measures the potential sources on each individual exposure using library point-spread functions and cross-correlates these observations with the original ACS-Survey catalog. The catalog of 57 clusters we publish here will be useful to identify stars in the different stellar populations, in particular for spectroscopic follow-up. Eventually, we will construct a more sophisticated catalog and artificial-star tests based on an optimal reduction of the UV survey data, but the catalogs presented here give the community the chance to make early use of this HST Treasury survey.
  • In order to understand the observed physical and orbital diversity of extrasolar planetary systems, a full investigation of these objects and of their host stars is necessary. Within this field, one of the main purposes of the GAPS observing project with HARPS-N@TNG is to provide a more detailed characterisation of already known systems. In this framework we monitored the star, hosting two giant planets, HD108874, with HARPS-N for three years in order to refine the orbits, to improve the dynamical study and to search for additional low-mass planets in close orbits. We subtracted the radial velocity (RV) signal due to the known outer planets, finding a clear modulation of 40.2 d period. We analysed the correlation between RV residuals and the activity indicators and modelled the magnetic activity with a dedicated code. Our analysis suggests that the 40.2 d periodicity is a signature of the rotation period of the star. A refined orbital solution is provided, revealing that the system is close to a mean motion resonance of about 9:2, in a stable configuration over 1 Gyr. Stable orbits for low-mass planets are limited to regions very close to the star or far from it. Our data exclude super-Earths with Msin i \gtrsim 5 M_Earth within 0.4 AU and objects with Msin i \gtrsim 2 M_Earth with orbital periods of a few days. Finally we put constraints on the habitable zone of the system, assuming the presence of an exomoon orbiting the inner giant planet.
  • One of the most unexpected results in the field of stellar populations of the last few years, is the discovery that some Magellanic-Cloud globular clusters younger than ~400 Myr, exhibit bimodal main sequences (MSs) in their color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Moreover, these young clusters host an extended main sequence turn off (eMSTO) in close analogy with what is observed in most ~1-2 Gyr old clusters of both Magellanic Clouds. We use high-precision Hubble-Space-Telescope photometry to study the young star cluster NGC1866 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discover an eMSTO and a split MS. The analysis of the CMD reveals that (i) the blue MS is the less populous one, hosting about one-third of the total number of MS stars; (ii) red-MS stars are more centrally concentrated than blue-MS stars; (iii) the fraction of blue-MS stars with respect to the total number of MS stars drops by a factor of ~2 in the upper MS with F814W <~19.7. The comparison between the observed CMDs and stellar models reveals that the observations are consistent with ~200 Myr old highly-rotating stars on the red-MS, with rotation close to critical value, plus a non-rotating stellar population spanning an age interval between ~140 and 220 Myr, on the blue-MS. Noticeable, neither stellar populations with different ages only, nor coeval stellar models with different rotation rates, properly reproduce the observed split MS and eMSTO. We discuss these results in the context of the eMSTO and multiple MS phenomenon.
  • The distribution of exoplanets around low-mass stars is still not well understood. Such stars, however, present an excellent opportunity of reaching down to the rocky and habitable planet domains. The number of current detections used for statistical purposes is still quite modest and different surveys, using both photometry and precise radial velocities, are searching for planets around M dwarfs. Our HARPS-N red dwarf exoplanet survey is aimed at the detection of new planets around a sample of 78 selected stars, together with the subsequent characterization of their activity properties. Here we investigate the survey performance and strategy. From 2700 observed spectra, we compare the radial velocity determinations of the HARPS-N DRS pipeline and the HARPS-TERRA code, we calculate the mean activity jitter level, we evaluate the planet detection expectations, and we address the general question of how to define the strategy of spectroscopic surveys in order to be most efficient in the detection of planets. We find that the HARPS-TERRA radial velocities show less scatter and we calculate a mean activity jitter of 2.3 m/s for our sample. For a general radial velocity survey with limited observing time, the number of observations per star is key for the detection efficiency. In the case of an early M-type target sample, we conclude that approximately 50 observations per star with exposure times of 900 s and precisions of about 1 m/s maximizes the number of planet detections.
  • (Abridged) Understanding stellar activity in M dwarfs is crucial for the physics of stellar atmospheres as well as for ongoing radial velocity exoplanet programmes. Despite the increasing interest in M dwarfs, our knowledge of the chromospheres of these stars is far from being complete. We aim to test whether the relations between activity, rotation, and stellar parameters and flux-flux relationships also hold for early-M dwarfs on the main-sequence. We analyse in an homogeneous and coherent way a well defined sample of 71 late-K/early-M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HArps-n red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES). Rotational velocities are derived using the cross-correlation technique while emission flux excesses in the Ca II H & K and Balmer lines from Halpha up to Hepsilon are obtained by using the spectral subtraction technique. The relationships between the emission excesses and the stellar parameters are studied. Relations between pairs of fluxes of different chromospheric lines are also studied. We find that the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Ca II H & K and Balmer lines is roughly constant for stars in the M0-M3 spectral range. Our data suggest that a moderate but significant correlation between activity and rotation might be present as well as a hint of kinematically selected young stars showing higher levels of emission. We find our sample of M dwarfs to be complementary in terms of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes with those of the literature, extending the analysis of the flux-flux relationships to the very low flux domain. Our results agree with previous works suggesting that the activity-rotation-age relationship known to hold for solar-type stars also applies to early-M dwarfs. We also confirm previous findings that the field stars which deviate from the bulk of the empirical flux-flux relationships show evidence of youth.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GC) is characterising many different aspects of their multiple stellar populations. The "Grundahl-jump" (G-jump) is a discontinuity in ultraviolet brightness of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars, signalling the onset of radiative metal levitation. The HB Legacy data confirmed that the G-jump is located at the same T$_{eff}$ ($\simeq$11,500 K) in nearly all clusters. The only exceptions are the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the G-jump occurs at T$_{eff}\simeq$13-14,000K. We compute synthetic HB models based on new evolutionary tracks including the effect of helium diffusion, and approximately accounting for the effect of metal levitation in a stable atmosphere. Our models show that the G-jump location depends on the interplay between the timescale of diffusion and the timescale of the evolution in the T$_{eff}$ range 11,500 K$\lessapprox$T$_{eff}\lessapprox$14,000 K. The G-jump becomes hotter than 11,500 K only for stars that have, in this T$_{eff}$ range, a helium mass fraction Y>0.35. Similarly high Y values are also consistent with the modelling of the HB in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441. In these clusters we predict that a significant fraction of HB stars show helium in their spectra above 11,500 K, and full helium settling should only be found beyond the hotter G-jump.