• The main characteristics in the radio continuum spectra of Supernova Remnants (SNRs) result from simple synchrotron emission. In addition, electron acceleration mechanisms can shape the spectra in specific ways, especially at high radio frequencies. These features are connected to the age and the peculiar conditions of the local interstellar medium interacting with the SNR. Whereas the bulk radio emission is expected at up to $20-50$ GHz, sensitive high-resolution images of SNRs above 10 GHz are lacking and are not easily achievable, especially in the confused regions of the Galactic Plane. In the framework of the early science observations with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in February-March 2016, we obtained high-resolution images of SNRs Tycho, W44 and IC443 that provided accurate integrated flux density measurements at 21.4 GHz: 8.8 $\pm$ 0.9 Jy for Tycho, 25 $\pm$ 3 Jy for W44 and 66 $\pm$ 7 Jy for IC443. We coupled the SRT measurements with radio data available in the literature in order to characterise the integrated and spatially-resolved spectra of these SNRs, and to find significant frequency- and region-dependent spectral slope variations. For the first time, we provide direct evidence of a spectral break in the radio spectral energy distribution of W44 at an exponential cutoff frequency of 15 $\pm$ 2 GHz. This result constrains the maximum energy of the accelerated electrons in the range $6-13$ GeV, in agreement with predictions indirectly derived from AGILE and \textit{Fermi}-LAT gamma-ray observations. With regard to IC443, our results confirm the noticeable presence of a bump in the integrated spectrum around $20-70$ GHz that could result from a spinning dust emission mechanism.
  • We report the detection of diffuse radio emission which might be connected to a large-scale filament of the cosmic web covering a 8deg x 8deg area in the sky, likely associated with a z~0.1 over-density traced by nine massive galaxy clusters. In this work, we present radio observations of this region taken with the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Two of the clusters in the field host a powerful radio halo sustained by violent ongoing mergers and provide direct proof of intra-cluster magnetic fields. In order to investigate the presence of large-scale diffuse radio synchrotron emission in and beyond the galaxy clusters in this complex system, we combined the data taken at 1.4 GHz obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope with higher resolution data taken with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We found 28 candidate new sources with a size larger and X-ray emission fainter than known diffuse large-scale synchrotron cluster sources for a given radio power. This new population is potentially the tip of the iceberg of a class of diffuse large-scale synchrotron sources associated with the filaments of the cosmic web. In addition, we found in the field a candidate new giant radio galaxy.
  • We observed the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Sardinia Radio Telescope to provide new constraints on its spectral properties at high frequency. We conducted observations in three frequency bands centred at 1.4 GHz, 6.6 GHz and 19 GHz, resulting in beam resolutions of 14$^{\prime}$, 2.9$^{\prime}$ and 1$^{\prime}$ respectively. These single-dish data were also combined with archival interferometric observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. From the combined images, we measured a flux density of ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(158.3\pm9.6)\,mJy}$ for the central radio halo and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(126\pm8)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(11.7\pm0.7)\,mJy}$ for the northern and the southern relic respectively. After the spectral modelling of the discrete sources, we measured at 6.6 GHz ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(17.1\pm1.2)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(0.6\pm0.3)\,mJy}$ for the northern and southern relic respectively. Assuming simple diffusive shock acceleration, we interpret measurements of the northern relic with a continuous injection model represented by a broken power-law. This yields an injection spectral index ${\rm \alpha_{inj}=0.7\pm0.1}$ and a Mach number ${\rm M=3.3\pm0.9}$, consistent with recent X-ray estimates. Unlike other studies of the same object, no significant steepening of the relic radio emission is seen in data up to 8.35 GHz. By fitting the southern relic spectrum with a simple power-law (${\rm S_{\nu}\propto\nu^{-\alpha}}$) we obtained a spectral index ${\rm \alpha\approx1.9}$ corresponding to a Mach number (${\rm M\approx1.8}$) in agreement with X-ray estimates. Finally, we evaluated the rotation measure of the northern relic at 6.6 GHz. These results provide new insights on the magnetic structure of the relic, but further observations are needed to clarify the nature of the observed Faraday rotation.
  • Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) are a powerful tool for investigating the later stages of stellar evolution, the properties of the ambient interstellar medium, and the physics of particle acceleration and shocks. For a fraction of SNRs, multi-wavelength coverage from radio to ultra high-energies has been provided, constraining their contributions to the production of Galactic cosmic rays. Although radio emission is the most common identifier of SNRs and a prime probe for refining models, high-resolution images at frequencies above 5 GHz are surprisingly lacking, even for bright and well-known SNRs such as IC443 and W44. In the frameworks of the Astronomical Validation and Early Science Program with the 64-m single-dish Sardinia Radio Telescope, we provided, for the first time, single-dish deep imaging at 7 GHz of the IC443 and W44 complexes coupled with spatially-resolved spectra in the 1.5-7 GHz frequency range. Our images were obtained through on-the-fly mapping techniques, providing antenna beam oversampling and resulting in accurate continuum flux density measurements. The integrated flux densities associated with IC443 are S_1.5GHz = 134 +/- 4 Jy and S_7GHz = 67 +/- 3 Jy. For W44, we measured total flux densities of S_1.5GHz = 214 +/- 6 Jy and S_7GHz = 94 +/- 4 Jy. Spectral index maps provide evidence of a wide physical parameter scatter among different SNR regions: a flat spectrum is observed from the brightest SNR regions at the shock, while steeper spectral indices (up to 0.7) are observed in fainter cooling regions, disentangling in this way different populations and spectra of radio/gamma-ray-emitting electrons in these SNRs.
  • [Abridged] The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the new 64-m dish operated by INAF (Italy). Its active surface will allow us to observe at frequencies of up to 116 GHz. At the moment, three receivers, one per focal position, have been installed and tested. The SRT was officially opened in October 2013, upon completion of its technical commissioning phase. In this paper, we provide an overview of the main science drivers for the SRT, describe the main outcomes from the scientific commissioning of the telescope, and discuss a set of observations demonstrating the SRT's scientific capabilities. One of the main objectives of scientific commissioning was the identification of deficiencies in the instrumentation and/or in the telescope sub-systems for further optimization. As a result, the overall telescope performance has been significantly improved. As part of the scientific commissioning activities, different observing modes were tested and validated, and first astronomical observations were carried out to demonstrate the science capabilities of the SRT. In addition, we developed astronomer-oriented software tools, to support future observers on-site. The astronomical validation activities were prioritized based on technical readiness and scientific impact. The highest priority was to make the SRT available for joint observations as part of European networks. As a result, the SRT started to participate (in shared-risk mode) in EVN (European VLBI Network) and LEAP (Large European Array for Pulsars) observing sessions in early 2014. The validation of single-dish operations for the suite of SRT first light receivers and backends continued in the following years, and was concluded with the first call for shared-risk/early-science observations issued at the end of 2015.
  • We study the intra-cluster magnetic field in the poor galaxy cluster Abell 194 by complementing radio data, at different frequencies, with data in the optical and X-ray bands. We analyze new total intensity and polarization observations of Abell 194 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). We use the SRT data in combination with archival Very Large Array observations to derive both the spectral aging and Rotation Measure (RM) images of the radio galaxies 3C40A and 3C40B embedded in Abell 194. The optical analysis indicates that Abell 194 does not show a major and recent cluster merger, but rather agrees with a scenario of accretion of small groups. Under the minimum energy assumption, the lifetimes of synchrotron electrons in 3C40B measured from the spectral break are found to be 157 Myrs. The break frequency image and the electron density profile inferred from the X-ray emission are used in combination with the RM data to constrain the intra-cluster magnetic field power spectrum. By assuming a Kolmogorov power law power spectrum, we find that the RM data in Abell 194 are well described by a magnetic field with a maximum scale of fluctuations of Lambda_max=64 kpc and a central magnetic field strength of <B0>=1.5 microG. Further out, the field decreases with the radius following the gas density to the power of eta=1.1. Comparing Abell 194 with a small sample of galaxy clusters, there is a hint of a trend between central electron densities and magnetic field strengths.
  • We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently-commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1 deg x 1 deg centered on the radio source 3C 129. We modeled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster center. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source. If the magnetic field is at the equipartition value, we showed that the lifetimes of radiating electrons result in a radiative age for 3C 129 of t_syn = 267 +/- 26 Myrs. Assuming a linear projected length of 488 kpc for the tail, we deduced that 3C 129 is moving supersonically with a Mach number of M=v_gal/c_s=1.47. Linearly polarized emission was clearly detected for both 3C 129 and 3C 129.1. The linear polarization measured for 3C 129 reaches levels as high as 70% in the faintest region of the source where the magnetic field is aligned with the direction of the tail.
  • In the period 2012 June - 2013 October, the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) went through the technical commissioning phase. The characterization involved three first-light receivers, ranging in frequency between 300MHz and 26GHz, connected to a Total Power back-end. It also tested and employed the telescope active surface installed in the main reflector of the antenna. The instrument status and performance proved to be in good agreement with the expectations in terms of surface panels alignment (at present 300 um rms to be improved with microwave holography), gain (~0.6 K/Jy in the given frequency range), pointing accuracy (5 arcsec at 22 GHz) and overall single-dish operational capabilities. Unresolved issues include the commissioning of the receiver centered at 350 MHz, which was compromised by several radio frequency interferences, and a lower-than-expected aperture efficiency for the 22-GHz receiver when pointing at low elevations. Nevertheless, the SRT, at present completing its Astronomical Validation phase, is positively approaching its opening to the scientific community.
  • In Quantum Field Theory models with spontaneously broken gauge invariance, renormalizability limits to four the degree of the Higgs potential, whose minima determine the vacuum state at tree-level. In many models, this bound has the intriguing consequence of preventing the observability, at tree-level, of some phases that would be allowed by symmetry. We show that, generally, the phenomenon persists also if one-loop radiative corrections are taken into account. The tree-level unobservability of some phases is characteristic in two-Higgs-doublet extensions of the Standard Model with additional discrete symmetries (to protect against neutral current flavor changing effects, for instance). We show that an extension of the scalar sector through suitable singlet fields can resolve the {\em unnatural} limitations on the observability of all the phases allowed by symmetry.
  • It is shown that accurate photometric observations of a relatively high--magnification microlensing event ($A\gg 1$), occurring close to the line of sight of a gravitational wave (GW) source, represented by a binary star, can allow the detection of subtle gravitational effects. After reviewing the physical nature of such effects, it is discussed to what extent these phenomena can actually be due to GWs. Expressions for the amplitude of the phenomena and the detection probability are supplied.
  • In Quantum Field Theory models of electro-weak interactions with spontaneously broken gauge invariance, renormalizability limits to four the degree of the Higgs potential, whose minima determine the possible vacuum states in tree approximation. Through the discussion of some simple variants of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets, we show that, in some cases, the technical limit imposed by renormalizability can prevent the observability of some phases of the system, that would be otherwise allowed by the symmetry of the Higgs potential. An extension of the scalar sector through suitable SU$_2$ singlet particle fields can resolve this {\em unnatural} limitation.
  • Functions which are covariant or invariant under the transformations of a compact linear group $G$ acting in a euclidean space $\real^n$, can be profitably studied as functions defined in the orbit space of the group. The orbit space is the union of a finite set of strata, which are semialgebraic manifolds formed by the $G$-orbits with the same symmetry. In this paper we provide a simple recipe to obtain rational parametrizations of the strata. Our results can be easily exploited, in many physical contexts where the study of covariant or invariant functions is important, for instance in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking, in the analysis of phase spaces and structural phase transitions (Landau's theory), in covariant bifurcation theory, in crystal field theory and in most areas of solid state theory where use is made of symmetry adapted functions. An example of utilization of the recipe is also discussed at the end of the paper.
  • Functions which are equivariant or invariant under the transformations of a compact linear group $G$ acting in an euclidean space $\real^n$, can profitably be studied as functions defined in the orbit space of the group. The orbit space is the union of a finite set of strata, which are semialgebraic manifolds formed by the $G$-orbits with the same orbit-type. In this paper we provide a simple recipe to obtain rational parametrizations of the strata. Our results can be easily exploited, in many physical contexts where the study of equivariant or invariant functions is important, for instance in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking, in the analysis of phase spaces and structural phase transitions (Landau theory), in equivariant bifurcation theory, in crystal field theory and in most areas where use is made of symmetry adapted functions. A physically significant example of utilization of the recipe is given, related to spontaneous polarization in chiral biaxial liquid crystals, where the advantages with respect to previous heuristic approaches are shown.
  • A complete and rigorous determination of the possible ground states for D-wave pairing Bose condensates is presented, using a geometrical invariant theory approach to the problem. The order parameter is argued to be a vector, transforming according to a ten dimensional real representation of the group $G=${\bf O}$_3\otimes${\bf U}$_1\times <{\cal T}>$. We determine the equalities and inequalities defining the orbit space of this linear group and its symmetry strata, which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the possible distinct phases of the system. We find 15 allowed phases (besides the unbroken one), with different symmetries, that we thoroughly determine. The group-subgroup relations between bordering phases are pointed out. The perturbative sixth degree corrections to the minimum of a fourth degree polynomial $G$-invariant free energy, calculated by Mermin, are also determined.
  • A complete and rigorous determination of the possible ground states for D-wave pairing Bose condensates is presented. Using an orbit space approach to the problem, we find 15 allowed phases (besides the unbroken one), with different symmetries, that we thoroughly determine, specifying the group-subgroup relations between bordering phases.
  • Invariant functions under the transformations of a compact linear group $G$ acting in $\real^n$ can be expressed in terms of functions defined in the orbit space of $G$. We develop a method to determine the isotropy classes of the orbit spaces of all the real linear groups whose integrity bases (IB) satisfy only one independent relation. The method is tested for IB's formed by 3 (independent) basic invariants. The result is obtained through a metric matrix $\hat P(p)$, defined only from the scalar products between the gradients of a minimal IB. We determine the matrices $\wP(p)$ from a universal differential equation, which satisfy new convenient additional conditions, which fit for the non-coregular case. Our results may be relevant in physical contexts where the study of covariant or invariant functions is important, like in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum field theory, in the analysis of phase spaces and structural phase transitions (Landau's theory), in covariant bifurcation theory, in crystal field theory and so on.
  • Covariant or invariant functions under a compact linear group can be expressed in terms of functions defined in the orbit space of the group. The semialgebraic relations defining the orbit spaces of all finite coregular real linear groups with at most 4 basic invariants are determined. For each group $G$ acting in $\real^n$, the results are obtained through the computation of a metric matrix $\widehat P(p)$, which is defined only in terms of the scalar products between the gradients of a set of basic polynomial invariants $p_1(x),\dots p_q(x),\x\in\real^n$ of $G$; the semi-positivity conditions $\widehat P(p)\ge 0$ are known to determine all the equalities and inequalities defining the orbit space $\real^n/G$ of $G$ as a semi-algebraic variety in the space $\real^q$ spanned by the variables $p_1,\dots ,p_q$. In a recent paper, the $\widehat P$-matrices, for $q\le 4$, have been determined in an alternative way, as solutions of a universal differential equation;the present paper yields a partial, but significant, check on the correctness and completeness of these solutions. Our results can be widely exploited,e.g. in the determination of patterns of spontaneous symmetry breaking, in the analysis of structural phase transitions (Landau's theory),in covariant bifurcation theory,in crystal field theory and in solid state theory where symmetry adapted functions are used.