• Detection of weak radial velocity shifts of host stars induced by orbiting planets is an important technique for discovering and characterizing planets beyond our solar system. Optical frequency combs enable calibration of stellar radial velocity shifts at levels required for detection of Earth analogs. A new chip-based device, the Kerr soliton microcomb, has properties ideal for ubiquitous application outside the lab and even in future space-borne instruments. Moreover, microcomb spectra are ideally suited for astronomical spectrograph calibration and eliminate filtering steps required by conventional mode-locked-laser frequency combs. Here, for the calibration of astronomical spectrographs, we demonstrate an atomic/molecular line-referenced, near-infrared soliton microcomb. Efforts to search for the known exoplanet HD 187123b were conducted at the Keck-II telescope as a first in-the-field demonstration of microcombs.
  • We present the first near infra-red spectrum of the faint white dwarf companion HD 114174 B, obtained with Project 1640. Our spectrum, covering the Y, J and H bands, combined with previous TRENDS photometry measurements, allows us to place further constraints on this companion. We suggest two possible scenarios; either this object is an old, low mass, cool H atmosphere white dwarf with Teff ~ 3800 K or a high mass white dwarf with Teff > 6000 K, potentially with an associated cool (Teff ~ 700 K) brown dwarf or debris disk resulting in an infra-red excess in the L band. We also provide an additional astrometry point for 2014 June 12 and use the modelled companion mass combined with the RV and direct imaging data to place constraints on the orbital parameters for this companion.
  • Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric composition and luminosity, which is influenced by their formation mechanism. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the \$sim$20 Myr-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity of L/LS=1.6-4.0 x 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600-750 K. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold- start" core accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.
  • We describe a successful effort to produce a laser comb around 1.55 $\mu$m in the astronomical H band using a method based on a line-referenced, electro-optical-modulation frequency comb. We discuss the experimental setup, laboratory results, and proof of concept demonstrations at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Keck-II telescope. The laser comb has a demonstrated stability of $<$ 200 kHz, corresponding to a Doppler precision of ~0.3 m/s. This technology, when coupled with a high spectral resolution spectrograph, offers the promise of $<$1 m/s radial velocity precision suitable for the detection of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of cool M-type stars.
  • We present an analysis of the orbital motion of the four sub-stellar objects orbiting HR8799. Our study relies on the published astrometric history of this system augmented with an epoch obtained with the Project 1640 coronagraph + Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. We first focus on the intricacies associated with astrometric estimation using the combination of an Extreme Adaptive Optics system (PALM-3000), a coronagraph and an IFS. We introduce two new algorithms. The first one retrieves the stellar focal plane position when the star is occulted by a coronagraphic stop. The second one yields precise astrometric and spectro-photometric estimates of faint point sources even when they are initially buried in the speckle noise. The second part of our paper is devoted to studying orbital motion in this system. In order to complement the orbital architectures discussed in the literature, we determine an ensemble of likely Keplerian orbits for HR8799bcde, using a Bayesian analysis with maximally vague priors regarding the overall configuration of the system. While the astrometric history is currently too scarce to formally rule out coplanarity, HR8799d appears to be misaligned with respect to the most likely planes of HR8799bce orbits. This misalignment is sufficient to question the strictly coplanar assumption made by various authors when identifying a Laplace resonance as a potential architecture. Finally, we establish a high likelihood that HR8799de have dynamical masses below 13 M_Jup using a loose dynamical survival argument based on geometric close encounters. We illustrate how future dynamical analyses will further constrain dynamical masses in the entire system.
  • We obtained spectra, in the wavelength range \lambda = 995 - 1769 nm, of all four known planets orbiting the star HR 8799. Using the suite of instrumentation known as Project 1640 on the Palomar 5-m Hale Telescope, we acquired data at two epochs. This allowed for multiple imaging detections of the companions and multiple extractions of low-resolution (R ~ 35) spectra. Data reduction employed two different methods of speckle suppression and spectrum extraction, both yielding results that agree. The spectra do not directly correspond to those of any known objects, although similarities with L and T-dwarfs are present, as well as some characteristics similar to planets such as Saturn. We tentatively identify the presence of CH_4 along with NH_3 and/or C_2H_2, and possibly CO_2 or HCN in varying amounts in each component of the system. Other studies suggested red colors for these faint companions, and our data confirm those observations. Cloudy models, based on previous photometric observations, may provide the best explanation for the new data presented here. Notable in our data is that these presumably co-eval objects of similar luminosity have significantly different spectra; the diversity of planets may be greater than previously thought. The techniques and methods employed in this paper represent a new capability to observe and rapidly characterize exoplanetary systems in a routine manner over a broad range of planet masses and separations. These are the first simultaneous spectroscopic observations of multiple planets in a planetary system other than our own.
  • Near-IR observations are important for the detection and characterization of exoplanets using the transit technique, either in surveys of large numbers of stars or for follow-up spectroscopic observations of individual planets. In a controlled laboratory experiment, we imaged $\sim 10^4$ critically sampled spots onto an Teledyne Hawaii-2RG (H2RG) detector to emulate an idealized star-field. We obtained time-series photometry of up to $\simeq 24$ hr duration for ensembles of $\sim 10^3$ pseudo-stars. After rejecting correlated temporal noise caused by various disturbances, we measured a photometric performance of $<$50 ppm-hr$^{-1/2}$ limited only by the incident photon rate. After several hours we achieve a photon-noise limited precision level of $10\sim20$ ppm after averaging many independent measurements. We conclude that IR detectors such as the H2RG can make the precision measurements needed to detect the transits of terrestrial planets or detect faint atomic or molecular spectral features in the atmospheres of transiting extrasolar planets.
  • Exoplanetary science is among the fastest evolving fields of today's astronomical research. Ground-based planet-hunting surveys alongside dedicated space missions (Kepler, CoRoT) are delivering an ever-increasing number of exoplanets, now numbering at ~690, with ESA's GAIA mission planned to bring this number into the thousands. The next logical step is the characterisation of these worlds: what is their nature? Why are they as they are? The use of the HST and Spitzer Space Telescope to probe the atmospheres of transiting hot, gaseous exoplanets has demonstrated that it is possible with current technology to address this ambitious goal. The measurements have also shown the difficulty of understanding the physics and chemistry of these environments when having to rely on a limited number of observations performed on a handful of objects. To progress substantially in this field, a dedicated facility for exoplanet characterization with an optimised instrument design (detector performance, photometric stability, etc.), able to observe through time and over a broad spectral range a statistically significant number of planets, will be essential. We analyse the performances of a 1.2/1.4m space telescope for exoplanet transit spectroscopy from the visible to the mid IR, and present the SNR ratio as function of integration time and stellar magnitude/spectral type for the acquisition of spectra of planetary atmospheres in a variety of scenarios: hot, warm, and temperate planets, orbiting stars ranging in spectral type from hot F to cool M dwarfs. We include key examples of known planets (e.g. HD 189733b, Cancri 55 e) and simulations of plausible terrestrial and gaseous planets, with a variety of thermodynamical conditions. We conclude that even most challenging targets, such as super-Earths in the habitable-zone of late-type stars, are within reach of a M-class, space-based spectroscopy mission.
  • Spectral features corresponding to methane and water opacity were reported based on spectroscopic observations of HD 189733b with Hubble/NICMOS. Recently, these data, and other NICMOS exoplanet spectroscopy measurements, have been reexamined in Gibson et al. 2010, who claim that the features in the transmission spectra are due to uncorrected systematic errors and not molecular opacities. We examine the methods used by the Gibson team and show that, contrary to their claim, their results for the transmission spectrum of HD 189733b are in fact in agreement with the original results. In the case of HD 189733b, the most significant problem with the Gibson approach is a poorly determined instrument model, which causes (1) an increase in the formal uncertainty and (2) instability in the minimization process; although Gibson et al. do recover the correct spectrum, they cannot identify it due to the problems caused by a poorly determined instrument model. In the case of XO-1b, the Gibson method is fundamentally flawed because they omit the most important parameters from the instrument model. For HD 189733b, the Gibson team did not omit these parameters, which explains why they are able to reproduce previous results in this case, although with poor SNR.
  • We report here the first infrared spectrum of the hot-Jupiter XO-1b. The observations were obtained with NICMOS instrument onboard the Hubble Space Telescope during a primary eclipse of the XO-1 system. Near photon-noise-limited spectroscopy between 1.2 and 1.8 micron allows us to determine the main composition of this hot-Jupiter's planetary atmosphere with good precision. This is the third hot-Jupiter's atmosphere for which spectroscopic data are available in the near IR. The spectrum shows the presence of water vapor (H2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), and suggests the possible presence of carbon monoxide (CO). We show that the published IRAC secondary transit emission photometric data are compatible with the atmospheric composition at the terminator determined from the NICMOS spectrum, with a range of possible mixing-ratios and thermal profiles; additional emission spectroscopy data are needed to reduce the degeneracy of the possible solutions. Finally, we note the similarity between the 1.2-1.8 micron transmission spectra of XO-1b and HD 209458b, suggesting that in addition to having similar stellar/orbital and planetary parameters the two systems may also have a similar exoplanetary atmospheric composition.
  • Nov. 16, 2009 astro-ph.EP
    Over 300 extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been detected orbiting nearby stars. We now hope to conduct a census of all planets around nearby stars and to characterize their atmospheres and surfaces with spectroscopy. Rocky planets within their star's habitable zones have the highest priority, as these have the potential to harbor life. Our science goal is to find and characterize all nearby exoplanets; this requires that we measure the mass, orbit, and spectroscopic signature of each one at visible and infrared wavelengths. The techniques for doing this are at hand today. Within the decade we could answer long-standing questions about the evolution and nature of other planetary systems, and we could search for clues as to whether life exists elsewhere in our galactic neighborhood.
  • Using the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have measured the dayside spectrum of HD 209458b between 1.5--2.5 microns. The emergent spectrum is dominated by features due to the presence of methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O), with smaller contributions from carbon dioxide (CO2). Combining this near-infrared spectrum with existing mid-infrared measurements shows the existence of a temperature inversion and confirms the interpretation of previous photometry measurements. We find a family of plausible solutions for the molecular abundance and detailed temperature profile. Observationally resolving the ambiguity between abundance and temperature requires either (1) improved wavelength coverage or spectral resolution of the dayside emission spectrum, or (2) a transmission spectrum where abundance determinations are less sensitive to the temperature structure.
  • We have measured the dayside spectrum of HD 189733b between 1.5 and 2.5 microns using the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The emergent spectrum contains significant modulation, which we attribute to the presence of molecular bands seen in absorption. We find that water (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are needed to explain the observations, and we are able to estimate the mixing ratios for these molecules. We also find temperature decreases with altitude in the ~0.01 < P < ~1 bar region of the dayside near-infrared photosphere and set an upper limit to the dayside abundance of methane (CH4) at these pressures.
  • We report observations of the nova RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) using the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), approximately 3.8 days following the most recent outburst that occurred on 2006 February 12. These observations represent the first scientific results from the KIN, which operates in N-band from 8 to 12.5 microns in a nulling mode. By fitting the unique KIN data, we have obtained an angular size of the mid-infrared continuum of 6.2, 4.0, or 5.4 mas for a disk profile, gaussian profile (FWHM), and shell profile respectively. The data show evidence of enhanced neutral atomic hydrogen emission and atomic metals including silicon located in the inner spatial regime near the white dwarf (WD) relative to the outer regime. There are also nebular emission lines and evidence of hot silicate dust in the outer spatial region, centered at ! 17 AU from the WD, that are not found in the inner regime. Our evidence suggests that these features have been excited by the nova flash in the outer spatial regime before the blast wave reached these regions. These identifications support a model in which the dust appears to be present between outbursts and is not created during the outburst event. We further discuss the present results in terms of a unifying model of the system that includes an increase in density in the plane of the orbit of the two stars created by a spiral shock wave caused by the motion of the stars through the cool wind of the red giant star. These data show the power and potential of the nulling technique which has been developed for the detection of Earth-like planets around nearby stars for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission and Darwin missions.
  • We present new K-band long baseline interferometer observations of three young stellar objects of the FU Orionis class, V1057 Cyg, V1515 Cyg and Z CMa-SE, obtained at the Keck Interferometer during its commissioning science period. The interferometer clearly resolves the source of near-infrared emission in all three objects. Using simple geometrical models we derive size scales (0.5-4.5 AU) for this emission. All three objects appear significantly more resolved than expected from simple models of accretion disks tuned to fit the broadband optical and infrared spectro-photometry. We explore variations in the key parameters that are able to lower the predicted visibility amplitudes to the measured levels, and conclude that accretion disks alone do not reproduce the spectral energy distributions and K-band visibilities simultaneously. We conclude that either disk models are inadequate to describe the near-infrared emission, or additional source components are needed. We hypothesize that large scale emission (10s of AU) in the interferometer field of view is responsible for the surprisingly low visibilities. This emission may arise in scattering by large envelopes believed to surround these objects.
  • We present high-resolution radio and X-ray studies of the composite supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Using archival VLA data, we perform radio spectral tomography to measure for the first time the spectrum of the shell and plerion separately. We compare the radio morphology of each component to that observed in the hard and soft Chandra X-ray images. We measure the X-ray spectra of the shell and the emission in the interior and discuss the hypothesis that soft X-ray emission interior to the shell is the result of the expanding pulsar wind shocking with the supernova ejecta. We also see evidence for spatial variability in the hard X-ray emission near the pulsar, which we discuss in terms of ion mediated relativistic shocks.
  • We report on a long-term monitoring campaign of 1E 1841-045, the 12-s anomalous X-ray pulsar and magnetar candidate at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 73. We have obtained approximately monthly observations of the pulsar with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer spanning over two years, during which time 1E 1841-045 is found to be rotating with sufficient stability to derive a phase-connected timing solution. A linear ephemeris is consistent with observations of the pulse period made over the last 15 yrs with the Ginga, ASCA, XTE, & SAX observatories. Phase residuals suggest the presence of "timing noise", as is typically observed from young radio pulsars. These results confirm a rapid, constant spin-down for the pulsar, which continues to maintain a steady flux; this is inconsistent with most accretion scenarios.
  • We present observations of the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater SGR 1806-20 taken with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We identify the X-ray counterpart of SGR 1806-20 based on detection of 7.5-s pulsations. Using three unrelated X-ray sources (and USNO stars) as position references, we are able to determine that the SGR is at alpha_{2000}=18h08m39.32s and delta_{2000}=-20o24'39.5", with rms uncertainty of 0.3" in each coordinate. We find that SGR 1806-20 is located within the 1-sigma error region determined by Interplanetary Network data and is 14+/-0.5 arcsec distant from the non-thermal core of SNR G10.0-0.3, excluding SGR 1806-20 as the origin of the core. We see evidence for a significant deviation of the spin-down of SGR 1806-20 from its long-term trend, demonstrating erratic spin-down behavior in this source similar to that seen in other SGRs. Finally, we show that there is a broad X-ray halo surrounding SGR 1806-20 out to radii ~1' due to scattering in the interstellar medium.
  • We present Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging observations of the young Galactic supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. The image shows that the previously known young 65-ms X-ray pulsar is at position (J2000) RA 18h 11m 29.22s, DEC -19o 25' 27.''6, with 1 sigma error radius 0.''6. This is within 8'' of the geometric center of the shell. This provides strong confirming evidence that the system is younger, by a factor of ~12, than the characteristic age of the pulsar. The age discrepancy suggests that pulsar characteristic ages can be poor age estimators for young pulsars. Assuming conventional spin down with constant magnetic field and braking index, the most likely explanation for the age discrepancy in G11.2-0.3 is that the pulsar was born with a spin period of ~62 ms. The Chandra image also reveals, for the first time, the morphology of the pulsar wind nebula. The elongated hard-X-ray structure can be interpreted as either a jet or a Crab-like torus seen edge on. This adds to the growing list of highly aspherical pulsar wind nebulae and argues that such structures are common around young pulsars.
  • Important constraints on the properties of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGRs) can be provided by their associations with supernova remnants (SNRs). We have made a radio search for SNRs towards the AXPs RX J170849-400910 and 4U 0142+61 - we find that the former lies near a possible new SNR with which it is unlikely to be physically associated, but see no SNR in the vicinity of the latter. We review all claimed pairings between AXPs and SNRs; the three convincing associations imply that AXPs are young (< 10 000 yr) neutron stars with low projected space velocities (< 500 km/s). Contrary to previous claims, we find no evidence that the density of the ambient medium around AXPs is higher than that in the vicinity of radio pulsars. Furthermore, the non-detection of radio emission from AXPs does not imply that these sources are radio-silent. We also review claimed associations between SGRs and SNRs. We find none of these associations to be convincing, consistent with a scenario in which SGRs and AXPs are both populations of high-field neutron stars ("magnetars") but in which the SGRs are an older or longer-lived group of objects than are the AXPs. If the SGR/SNR associations are shown to be valid, then SGRs must be high-velocity objects and most likely represent a different class of source to the AXPs.
  • We present follow-up observations of the serendipitously discovered 7-s X-ray pulsar AX J1845-0258, which displays characteristics similar to those observed in the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We find a dramatic reduction in its 3-10 keV flux in both new ASCA and RXTE datasets. Within the pulsar's position-error locus, we detect a faint point source, AX J184453-025640, surrounded by an arc of diffuse X-ray emission. This arc is coincident with the South-East quadrant of the radio shell of the newly discovered supernova remnant G29.6+0.1, reported in our companion paper (Gaensler et al. 1999). Lack of sufficient flux from the source prevents us from confirming the 7-s pulsed emission observed in the bright state; hence, at present we cannot definitively resolve whether AX J1845-0258 and AX J184453-025640 are one and the same. If they are the same, then the peak-to-peak luminosity changes recorded for AX J1845-0258 may be larger than seen in other AXPs; closer monitoring of this pulsar might lead to a resolution on the mechanism that drives AXPs.
  • A new ASCA observation of 1E 161348-5055, the central compact X-ray source in the supernova remnant RCW 103, reveals an order-of-magnitude decrease in its 3 - 10 keV flux since the previous ASCA measurement four years earlier. This result is hard to reconcile with suggestions that the bulk of the emission is simple quasi-blackbody, cooling radiation from an isolated neutron star. Furthermore, archived EINSTEIN and ROSAT datasets spanning 18 years confirm that this source manifests long-term variability, to a lesser degree. This provides a natural explanation for difficulties encountered in reproducing the original EINSTEIN detection of 1E 161348-5055. Spectra from the new data are consistent with no significant spectral change despite the decline in luminosity. We find no evidence for a pulsed component in any of the data sets, with a best upper limit on the pulsed modulation of 13 percent. We discuss the phenomenology of this remarkable source.
  • We report the discovery of pulsed X-ray emission from the compact source 1E 1841-045, using data obtained with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics. The X-ray source is located in the center of the small-diameter supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 and is very likely to be the compact stellar-remnant of the supernova which formed Kes 73. The X-rays are pulsed with a period of ~ 11.8 s, and a sinusoidal modulation of roughly 30 %. We interpret this modulation to be the rotation period of an embedded neutron star, and as such would be the longest spin period for an isolated neutron star to-date. This is especially remarkable since the surrounding SNR is very young, at ~ 2000 yr old. We suggest that the observed characteristics of this object are best understood within the framework of a neutron star with an enormous dipolar magnetic field, B ~ 8x10^14 G.
  • The soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) 1806$-$20 is associated with the center-brightened non-thermal nebula G~10.0$-$0.3, thought to be a plerion. As in other plerions, a steady \Xray\ source, AX~1805.7$-$2025, has been detected coincident with the peak of the nebular radio emission. Vasisht et al.\ have shown that the radio peak has a core-jet appearance, and argue that the core marks the true position of the SGR. At optical wavelengths, we detect three objects in the vicinity of the radio core. Only for the star closest to the core, barely visible in the optical but bright in the infrared ($K=8.4\,$mag.), the reddening is consistent with the high extinction ($A_V\simeq30\,$mag.) that has been inferred for AX~1805.7$-$2025. From the absence of CO band absorption, we infer that the spectral type of this star is earlier than late~G/early~K. The large extinction probably arises in a molecular cloud located at a distance of 6$\,$kpc, which means that the star, just like AX~1805.7$-$2025, is in or behind this cloud. This implies that the star is a supergiant. Since supergiants are rare, a chance coincidence with the compact radio core is very unlikely. To our knowledge, there are only three other examples of luminous stars embedded in non-thermal radio nebulae, SS~433, \mbox{Cir X-1} and G~70.7+1.2. Given this and the low coincidence probability, we suggest that the bright star is physically associated with SGR~1806$-$20, making it the first stellar identification of a high-energy transient.
  • We report the results of radio flux-monitoring and high resolution observations at 3.6 cm with the VLA, of the central condensation in G10.0-0.3, the radio nebula surrounding the soft gamma ray repeater (SGR) 1806-20. The quiescent X-ray source AX1805.7-2025 is coincident with the radio core suggesting that G10.0-0.3 is a plerionic supernova remnant. The monitoring experiment was performed in 10 epochs spread over five months, starting just before the latest reactivation of SGR 1806-20 in gamma-rays. There is no apparent increase in the radio flux density from the central region of G10.0-0.3 on timescales of days to months following the gamma-ray bursts. At a resolution of 1 arcsec the peak region of G10.0-0.3 is seen to consist of a compact source with diffuse, one-sided emission, reminiscent of core-jet geometry seen in AGNs and some accreting Galactic binaries. By analogy with these latter sources, we argue that the SGR 1806-20 is coincident with the core component. If so, this is the first arcsecond localization of a high energy transient. The lack of radio variability and the low brightness temperature of the central component distinguish SGR 1806-20 from other accreting binaries. The structure of the high resolution radio image also does not particularly resemble that seen in the vicinity of young pulsars. Thus there is no compelling observational evidence for either of the two models discussed for SGRs, the pulsar model or the accreting binary model.