• We present a detailed map of the uranium distribution and its uncertainties in the Variscan Basement of Northeastern Sardinia (VBNS) at a scale 1:100,000. An area of 2100 km2 was investigated by means of 535 data points obtained from laboratory and in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. These data volume corresponds to the highest sampling density of the European Variscides, aimed at studying the genetic processes of the upper crust potentially triggered by an enrichment of radiogenic heat-producing elements. For the first time the Kriging with Variance of Measurement Error method was used to assign weights to the input data which are based on the degree of confidence associated to the measurements obtained with different gamma-ray spectrometry techniques. A detailed tuning of the model parameters for the adopted Experimental Semi-Variogram led to identify a maximum distance of spatial variability coherent to the observed tendency of the experimental data. We demonstrate that the obtained uranium distribution in the VBNS, characterized by several calc-alkaline plutons emplaced within migmatitic massifs and amphibolite-facies metamorphic rocks, is an excellent benchmark for the study of 'hot' collisional chains. The uranium map of VBNS, and in particular the Arzachena minor pluton, confirms the emplacement model based on the recognition of the different petrological associations characterizing the Variscan magmatic processes in the Late Paleozoic. Furthermore, the presented model of the uranium content of the geological bedrock is a potential baseline for future mapping of radon-prone areas.
  • We have studied the alpha decays of 214Po into 210Pb and of 212Po into 208Pb tagged by the coincidence with the preceding beta decays from 214Bi and 212Bi, respectively. The employed 222Rn, 232Th, and 220Rn sources were sealed inside quartz vials and inserted in the Counting Test Facility at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. We find that the mean lifetime of 214Po is (236.00 +- 0.42(stat) +- 0.15(syst)) \mu s and that of 212Po is (425.1 +- 0.9(stat) +- 1.2(syst)) ns. Our results, obtained from data with signal-to-background ratio larger than 1000, reduce the overall uncertainties and are compatible with previous measurements.
  • In this paper we present maps of K, eU, and eTh abundances of Elba Island (Italy) obtained with a multivariate spatial interpolation of airborne {\gamma}-ray data using the constraints of the geologic map. The radiometric measurements were performed by a module of four NaI(Tl) crystals of 16 L mounted on an autogyro. We applied the collocated cokriging (CCoK) as a multivariate estimation method for interpolating the primary under-sampled airborne {\gamma}-ray data considering the well-sampled geological information as ancillary variables. A random number has been assigned to each of 73 geological formations identified in the geological map at scale 1:10,000. The non-dependency of the estimated results from the random numbering process has been tested for three distinct models. The experimental cross-semivariograms constructed for radioelement-geology couples show well-defined co-variability structures for both direct and crossed variograms. The high statistical correlations among K, eU, and eTh measurements are confirmed also by the same maximum distance of spatial autocorrelation. Combining the smoothing effects of probabilistic interpolator and the abrupt discontinuities of the geological map, the results show a distinct correlation between the geological formation and radioactivity content. The contour of Mt. Capanne pluton can be distinguished by high K, eU and eTh abundances, while different degrees of radioactivity content identify the tectonic units. A clear anomaly of high K content in the Mt. Calamita promontory confirms the presence of felsic dykes and hydrothermal veins not reported in our geological map. Although we assign a unique number to each geological formation, the method shows that the internal variability of the radiometric data is not biased by the multivariate interpolation.
  • Materials containing radionuclides of natural origin, which is modified by human made processes and being subject to regulation because of their radioactivity are known as NORM. We present a brief review of the main categories of non-nuclear industries together with the levels of activity concentration in feed raw materials, products and waste, including mechanisms of radioisotope enrichments. The global management of NORM shows a high level of complexity, mainly due to different degrees of radioactivity enhancement and the huge amount of worldwide waste production. The future tendency of guidelines concerning environmental protection will require both a systematic monitoring based on the ever-increasing sampling and high performance of gamma ray spectroscopy. On the ground of these requirements a new low background fully automated high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer MCA_Rad has been developed. The design of Pb and Cu shielding allowed to reach a background reduction of two order of magnitude with respect to laboratory radioactivity. A severe lowering of manpower cost is obtained through a fully automation system, which enables up to 24 samples to be measured without any human attendance. Two coupled HPGe detectors increase the detection efficiency, performing accurate measurements on sample volume (180 cc) with a reduction of sample transport cost of material. Details of the instrument calibration method are presented. MCA_Rad system can measure in less than one hour a typical NORM sample enriched in U and Th with some hundreds of Bq/kg, with an overall uncertainty less than 5%. Quality control of this method has been tested. Measurements of certified reference materials RGK-1, RGU-2 and RGTh-1 containing concentrations of K, U and Th comparable to NORM have been performed, resulting an overall relative discrepancy of 5% among central values within the reported uncertainty.
  • An increasing demand of environmental radioactivity monitoring comes both from the scientific community and from the society. This requires accurate, reliable and fast response preferably from portable radiation detectors. Thanks to recent improvements in the technology, $\gamma$-spectroscopy with sodium iodide scintillators has been proved to be an excellent tool for in-situ measurements for the identification and quantitative determination of $\gamma$-ray emitting radioisotopes, reducing time and costs. Both for geological and civil purposes not only $^{40}$K, $^{238}$U, and $^{232}$Th have to be measured, but there is also a growing interest to determine the abundances of anthropic elements, like $^{137}$Cs and $^{131}$I, which are used to monitor the effect of nuclear accidents or other human activities. The Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) approach has been chosen to analyze the $\gamma$-spectra. The Non Negative Least Square (NNLS) and the energy calibration adjustment have been implemented in this method for the first time in order to correct the intrinsic problem related with the $\chi ^2$ minimization which could lead to artifacts and non physical results in the analysis. A new calibration procedure has been developed for the FSA method by using in situ $\gamma$-spectra instead of calibration pad spectra. Finally, the new method has been validated by acquiring $\gamma$-spectra with a 10.16 cm x 10.16 cm sodium iodide detector in 80 different sites in the Ombrone basin, in Tuscany. The results from the FSA method have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detectors on soil samples collected in the different sites, showing a satisfactory agreement between them. In particular, the $^{137}$Cs isotopes has been implemented in the analysis since it has been found not negligible during the in-situ measurements.