• The Large-Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Age (LEDA) was designed to detect the predicted O(100)mK sky-averaged absorption of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Hydrogen in the neutral pre- and intergalactic medium just after the cosmological Dark Age. The spectral signature would be associated with emergence of a diffuse Ly$\alpha$ background from starlight during 'Cosmic Dawn'. Recently, Bowman et al. (2018) have reported detection of this predicted absorption feature, with an unexpectedly large amplitude of 530 mK, centered at 78 MHz. Verification of this result by an independent experiment, such as LEDA, is pressing. In this paper, we detail design and characterization of the LEDA radiometer systems, and a first-generation pipeline that instantiates a signal path model. Sited at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Long Wavelength Array, LEDA systems include the station correlator, five well-separated redundant dual polarization radiometers and backend electronics. The radiometers deliver a 30-85MHz band (16<z<34) and operate as part of the larger interferometric array, for purposes ultimately of in situ calibration. Here, we report on the LEDA system design, calibration approach, and progress in characterization as of January 2016. The LEDA systems are currently being modified to improve performance near 78 MHz in order to verify the purported absorption feature.
  • The third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) $\gamma$-ray source catalog (3FGL) contains over 1000 objects for which there is no known counterpart at other wavelengths. The physical origin of the $\gamma$-ray emission of those objects is unknown. Such objects are commonly referred to as unassociated and mostly do not exhibit significant $\gamma$-ray flux variability. We performed a survey of all unassociated $\gamma$-ray sources found in 3FGL using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Array in the range of 4.0-10.0 GHz. We found 2097 radio candidates for association with $\gamma$-ray sources. The follow-up with very long baseline interferometry for a subset of those candidates yielded 142 new AGN associations with $\gamma$-ray sources, provided alternative associations for 7 objects, and improved positions for another 144 known associations to the milliarcsecond level of accuracy. In addition, for 245 unassociated $\gamma$-ray sources we did not find a single compact radio source above 2 mJy within 3$\sigma$ of their $\gamma$-ray localization. A significant fraction of these empty fields, 39%, are located away from the galactic plane. We also found 36 extended radio sources that are candidates for association with a corresponding $\gamma$-ray object, 19 of which are most likely supernova remnants or HII regions, whereas 17 could be radio galaxies.
  • Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) are a subclass of pulsars first identified in 2006 that are detected only in searches for single pulses and not through their time averaged emission. Here, we present the results of observations of 19 RRATs using the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) at frequencies between 30 MHz and 88 MHz. The RRATs observed here were first detected in higher frequency pulsar surveys. Of the 19 RRATs observed, 2 sources were detected and their dispersion measures, periods, pulse profiles, and flux densities are reported and compared to previous higher frequency measurements. We find a low detection rate (11%), which could be a combination of the lower sensitivity of LWA1 compared to the higher frequency telescopes, and the result of scattering by the interstellar medium or a spectral turnover.
  • Using the narrowband all-sky imager mode of the LWA1 we have now detected 30 transients at 25.6 MHz, 1 at 34 MHz, and 93 at 38.0 MHz. While we have only optically confirmed that 37 of these events are radio afterglows from meteors, evidence suggests that most, if not all, are. Using the beam-forming mode of the LWA1 we have also captured the broadband spectra between 22.0 and 55.0 MHz of four events. We compare the smooth, spectral components of these four events and fit the frequency dependent flux density to a power law, and find that the spectral index is time variable, with the spectrum steepening over time for each meteor afterglow. Using these spectral indices along with the narrow band flux density measurements of the 123 events at 25.6 and 38 MHz, we predict the expected flux densities and rates for meteor afterglows potentially observable by other low frequency radio telescopes.
  • Narrow-band HST imaging has resolved the detailed internal structure of the 10 kpc diameter H alpha+[NII] emission line nebulosity in NGC4696, the central galaxy in the nearby Centaurus cluster, showing that the dusty, molecular, filaments have a width of about 60pc. Optical morphology and velocity measurements indicate that the filaments are dragged out by the bubbling action of the radio source as part of the AGN feedback cycle. Using the drag force we find that the magnetic field in the filaments is in approximate pressure equipartition with the hot gas. The filamentary nature of the cold gas continues inward, swirling around and within the Bondi accretion radius of the central black hole, revealing the magnetic nature of the gas flows in massive elliptical galaxies. HST imaging resolves the magnetic, dusty, molecular filaments at the centre of the Centaurus cluster to a swirl around and within the Bondi radius.
  • We present multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) follow-up observations of VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey sources identified as likely compact symmetric objects (CSOs) or super-massive binary black holes (SBBHs). We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 11 sources observed with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. While no new SBBHs can be confirmed from these observations, we have identified 24 CSOs in the sample, 15 of which are newly designated, and refuted 52 candidates leaving 33 unconfirmed candidates. This is the first large uniform sample of CSOs which can be used to elicit some of the general properties of these sources, including morphological evolution and environmental interaction. We have detected polarised emission from two of these CSOs the properties of which are consistent with Active Galactic Nuclei unification schemes.
  • We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ~7 kpc 'notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are multiple shocks, including a 1.9-kpc-radius inner shell-like structure and a weak 1.1-1.4 Mach number shock around the central cavities. Within a 10 kpc radius are 9 depressions in surface brightness, several of which appear to be associated with radio emission. The shocks and cavities imply that the nucleus has been repeatedly active on 5-10 Myr timescales, indicating a tight balance between heating and cooling. We confirm the presence of a series of linear quasi-periodic structures. If they are sound waves, the ~5 kpc spacing implies a period of 6 Myr, similar to the ages of the shocks and cavities. Alternatively, these structures may be Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, their associated turbulence or amplified magnetic field layers.
  • We present dynamic spectra from the LWA1 telescope of two large meteors (fireballs) observed to emit between 37 and 54 MHz. These spectra show the first ever recorded broadband measurements of this newly discovered VHF emission. The spectra show that the emission is smooth and steep, getting very bright at lower frequencies. We suggest that this signal is possibly emission of Langmuir waves and that these waves could be excited by a weak electron beam within the trail. The spectra of one fireball displays broadband temporal frequency sweeps. We suggest that these sweeps are evidence of individual expanding clumps of emitting plasma. While some of these proposed clumps may have formed at the very beginning of the fireball event, others must have formed seconds after the initial event.
  • We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 13,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz, for pulse widths of 5 s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of $>2.7\times 10^{-23}$, $>1.1\times 10^{-23}$, and $>2.8\times 10^{-23}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ to have rate densities $<1.2\times10^{-4}$, $<5.6\times10^{-4}$, and $<7.2\times10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$
  • Multiwavelength observations have revealed the highly unusual properties of the gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904, which are difficult to reconcile with any other well established gamma-ray source class. The object is either a very atypical blazar or compact jet source seen at a larger angle to the line of sight. In order to determine the physical origin of the high-energy emission processes in PMN J1603-4904, we study the X-ray spectrum in detail. We performed quasi-simultaneous X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and Suzaku in 2013 September, resulting in the first high signal-to-noise X-ray spectrum of this source. The 2-10 keV X-ray spectrum can be well described by an absorbed power law with an emission line at 5.44$\pm$0.05 keV (observed frame). Interpreting this feature as a K{\alpha} line from neutral iron, we determine the redshift of PMN J1603-4904 to be z=0.18$\pm$0.01, corresponding to a luminosity distance of 872$\pm$54 Mpc. The detection of a redshifted X-ray emission line further challenges the original BL Lac classification of PMN J1603-4904. This result suggests that the source is observed at a larger angle to the line of sight than expected for blazars, and thus the source would add to the elusive class of gamma-ray loud misaligned-jet objects, possibly a {\gamma}-ray bright young radio galaxy.
  • We present the findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), which has recorded over 11,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 25 and 75 MHz. In a search of this data for radio transients, we have found 49 long (10s of seconds) duration transients. Ten of these transients correlate both spatially and temporally with large meteors (fireballs), and their signatures suggest that fireballs emit a previously undiscovered low frequency, non-thermal pulse. This emission provides a new probe into the physics of meteors and identifies a new form of naturally occurring radio transient foreground.
  • As a backend to the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) the Prototype All Sky Imager (PASI) has been imaging the sky $>$ -26$^{\circ}$ declination during 34 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) between January 2012 and May 2013. Using this data we were able to put the most stringent limits to date on prompt low frequency emission from GRBs. While our limits depend on the zenith angle of the observed GRB, we estimate a 1$\sigma$ RMS sensitivity of 68, 65 and 70 Jy for 5 second integrations at 37.9, 52.0, and 74.0 MHz at zenith. These limits are relevant for pulses $\geq$ 5 s and are limited by dispersion smearing. For pulses of length 5 s we are limited to dispersion measures ($DM$s) $\leq$ 220, 570, and 1,600 pc cm$^{-3}$ for the frequencies above. For pulses lasting longer than 5s, the $DM$ limits increase linearly with the duration of the pulse. We also report two interesting transients, which are, as of yet, of unknown origin, and are not coincident with any known GRBs. For general transients, we give rate density limits of $\leq$ $7.5\times10^{-3}$, $2.9\times10^{-2}$, and $1.4\times10^{-2}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$ with pulse energy densities $>1.3\times 10^{-22}$, $1.1\times 10^{-22}$, and $1.4\times 10^{-22}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ and pulse widths of 5 s at the frequencies given above.
  • Radio astronomical imaging arrays comprising large numbers of antennas, O(10^2-10^3) have posed a signal processing challenge because of the required O(N^2) cross correlation of signals from each antenna and requisite signal routing. This motivated the implementation of a Packetized Correlator architecture that applies Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to the O(N) "F-stage" transforming time domain to frequency domain data, and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to the O(N^2) "X-stage" performing an outer product among spectra for each antenna. The design is readily scalable to at least O(10^3) antennas. Fringes, visibility amplitudes and sky image results obtained during field testing are presented.
  • MAXI J1659-152 was discovered on 2010 September 25 as a new X-ray transient, initially identified as a gamma-ray burst, but was later shown to be a new X-ray binary with a black hole as the most likely compact object. Dips in the X-ray light curves have revealed that MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest period black hole candidate identified to date. Here we present the results of a large observing campaign at radio, sub-millimeter, near-infrared (nIR), optical and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. We have combined this very rich data set with the available X-ray observations to compile a broadband picture of the evolution of this outburst. We have performed broadband spectral modeling, demonstrating the presence of a spectral break at radio frequencies and a relationship between the radio spectrum and X-ray states. Also, we have determined physical parameters of the accretion disk and put them into context with respect to the other parameters of the binary system. Finally, we have investigated the radio-X-ray and nIR/optical/UV-X-ray correlations up to ~3 years after the outburst onset to examine the link between the jet and the accretion disk, and found that there is no significant jet contribution to the nIR emission when the source is in the soft or intermediate X-ray spectral state, consistent with our detection of the jet break at radio frequencies during these states.
  • Context. The advent of Fermi is changing our understanding on the radio and gamma-ray emission in Active Galactic Nuclei. Contrary to pre-Fermi ideas, BL Lac objects are found to be the most abundant emitters in the gamma-ray band. However, since they are relatively weak radio sources, most of their parsec-scale structure and their multi-frequency properties are poorly understood and/or have not been investigated in a systematically fashion. Aims. Our main goal is to analyze the radio and gamma-ray emission properties of a sample of 42 BL Lacs selected, for the first time in the literature, with no constraint on their radio and gamma-ray flux densities/emission. Methods. Thanks to new Very Long Baseline Array observations at 8 and 15 GHz for the whole sample, we present here fundamental parameters such as radio flux densities, spectral index information, and parsec-scale structure. Moreover, we search for gamma-ray counterparts using data reported in the Second Catalog of Fermi Gamma-ray sources. Results. Parsec-scale radio emission is observed in the majority of the sources at both frequencies. Gamma-ray counterparts are found for 14/42 sources. Conclusions. The comparison between our results in radio and gamma-ray bands points out the presence of a large number of faint BL Lacs showing "non classical" properties such as low source compactness, core dominance, no gamma-ray emission and steep radio spectral indexes. A deeper multiwavelength analysis will be needed.
  • LWA1 is a new large radio telescope array operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz, located in central New Mexico. The telescope consists of 260 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose outputs are individually digitized and formed into beams. Simultaneously, signals from all dipoles can be recorded using one of the telescope's "all dipoles" modes, facilitating all-sky imaging. Notable features of the instrument include four independently-steerable beams utilizing digital "true time delay" beamforming, high intrinsic sensitivity (about 6 kJy zenith system equivalent flux density), large instantaneous bandwidth (up to 78 MHz), and large field of view (about 3-10 degrees, depending on frequency and zenith angle of pointing). This paper summarizes the design of LWA1, its performance as determined in commissioning experiments, and results from early science observations demonstrating the capabilities of the instrument.
  • We report the detection and observed characteristics of giant pulses from the Crab Nebula pulsar (B0531+21) in four frequency bands covering 20-84 MHz using the recently-completed Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope. In 10 hours of observations distributed over a 72-day period in Fall of 2012, 33 giant pulses having peak flux densities between 400 Jy and 2000 Jy were detected. Twenty-two of these pulses were detected simultaneously in channels of 16 MHz bandwidth centered at 44 MHz, 60 MHz, and 76 MHz, including one pulse which was also detected in a channel centered at 28 MHz. We quantify statistics of pulse amplitude and pulse shape characteristics, including pulse broadening. Amplitude statistics are consistent with expectations based on extrapolations from previous work at higher and lower frequencies. Pulse broadening is found to be relatively high, but not significantly greater than expected. We present procedures that have been found to be effective for observing giant pulses in this frequency range.
  • The parsec-scale radio properties of blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been investigated using observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Comparisons between LAT and non-LAT detected samples were made using contemporaneous data. In total, 232 sources were used in the LAT-detected sample. This very large, radio flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) provides insights into the mechanism that produces strong gamma-ray emission. It has been found that LAT-detected BL Lac objects are very similar to the non-LAT BL Lac objects in most properties, although LAT BL Lac objects may have longer jets. The LAT flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are significantly different from non-LAT FSRQs and are likely extreme members of the FSRQ population. Contemporaneous observations showed a strong correlation, whereas no correlation is found using archival radio data. Most of the differences between the LAT and non-LAT populations are related to the cores of the sources, indicating that the gamma-ray emission may originate near the base of the jets (i.e., within a few pc of the central engine). There is some indication that LAT-detected sources may have larger jet opening angles than the non-LAT sources. Strong core polarization is significantly more common among the LAT sources, suggesting that gamma-ray emission is related to strong, uniform magnetic fields at the base of the jets of the blazars. Observations of sources in two epochs indicate that core fractional polarization was higher when the objects were detected by the LAT. Included in our sample are several non-blazar AGN such as 3C84, M82, and NGC 6251.
  • We present the first statistical study of X-ray cavities in distant clusters of galaxies (z > 0.3). With the aim of providing further insight into how AGN feedback operates at higher redshift, we have analysed the Chandra X-ray observations of the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS) and searched for surface-brightness depressions associated with the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG). The MACS sample consists of the most X-ray luminous clusters within 0.3 < z < 0.7 (median L_(X,RASS) = 7*10^44 erg/s), and out of 76 clusters, we find 13 with "clear" cavities and 7 with "potential" cavities (detection rate ~25 per cent). Most of the clusters in which we find cavities have a short central cooling time below 3 - 5 Gyrs, consistent with the idea that cavities sit predominantly in cool core clusters. We also find no evidence for evolution in any of the cavity properties with redshift, up to z~0.6. The cavities of powerful outbursts are not larger (or smaller) at higher redshift, and are not able to rise to further (or lesser) distances from the nucleus. The energetics of these outbursts also remain the same. This suggests that extreme "radio mode" feedback (L_(mech) > 10^44 erg/s) starts to operate as early as 7 - 8 Gyrs after the Big Bang and shows no sign of evolution since then. In other words, AGNs lying at the centre of clusters are able to operate at early times with extreme mechanical powers, and have been operating in such a way for at least the past 5 Gyrs.
  • The aim of this work is to investigate the possible presence of extended diffuse synchrotron radio emission associated with the intracluster medium of the complex galaxy cluster A1689. The radio continuum emission of A1689 has been investigated by analyzing archival observations at 1.2 and 1.4 GHz obtained with the Very Large Array in different configurations. We report the detection of an extended, diffuse, low-surface brightness radio emission located in the central region of A1689. The surface brightness profile of the diffuse emission at 1.2 GHz indicates a central radio brightness of ~1.7 \mu Jy/arcsec^2 and the 3\sigma radio isophothes reveal the largest linear size to be 730 kpc. Given its central location, the low-level surface brightness, and the comparatively large extension, we classify the diffuse cluster-wide emission in A1689 as a small radio halo.
  • We present new Chandra images of the X-ray emission from the core of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The total observation time is now 1.4 Ms. New depressions in X-ray surface brightness are discovered to the north of NGC1275, which we interpret as old rising bubbles. They imply that bubbles are long-lived and do not readily breakup when rising in the hot cluster atmosphere. The existence of a 300 kpc long NNW-SSW bubble axis means there cannot be significant transverse large scale flows exceeding 100 km/s. Interesting spatial correlations are seen along that axis in early deep radio maps. A semi-circular cold front about 100 kpc west of the nucleus is seen. It separates an inner disturbed region dominated by the activity of the active nucleus of NGC1275 from the outer region where a subcluster merger dominates.
  • The galaxy NGC2770 hosted two core-collapse supernova explosions, SN2008D and SN2007uy, within 10 days of each other and 9 years after the first supernova of the same type, SN1999eh, was found in that galaxy. In particular SN2008D attracted a lot of attention due to the detection of an X-ray outburst, which has been hypothesized to be caused by either a (mildly) relativistic jet or the supernova shock breakout. We present an extensive study of the radio emission from SN2008D and SN2007uy: flux measurements with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, covering ~600 days with observing frequencies ranging from 325 MHz to 8.4 GHz. The results of two epochs of global Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations are also discussed. We have examined the molecular gas in the host galaxy NGC2770 with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-m telescope, and present the implications of our observations for the star formation and seemingly high SN rate in this galaxy. Furthermore, we discuss the near-future observing possibilities of the two SNe and their host galaxy at low radio frequencies with the Low Frequency Array.
  • We present new VLBI observations at 5 GHz of a complete sample of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in nearby Abell Clusters (distance class <3). Combined with data from the literature, this provides parsec-scale information for 34 BCGs. Our analysis of their parsec scale radio emission and cluster X-ray properties shows a possible dichotomy between BCGs in cool core clusters and those in non cool core clusters. Among resolved sources, those in cool core clusters tend to have two-sided parsec-scale jets, while those in less relaxed clusters have predominantly one-sided parsec-scale jets. We suggest that this difference could be the result of interplay between the jets and the surrounding medium. The one-sided structure in non cool core clusters could be due to Doppler boosting effects in relativistic, intrinsically symmetric jets; two-sided morphology in cool core clusters is likely related to the presence of heavy and mildly relativistic jets slowed down on the parsec-scale. Evidence of recurrent activity are also found in BCGs in cool core clusters.
  • We present multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of J16021+3326. These observations, along with variability data obtained from the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) candidate gamma-ray blazar monitoring program, clearly indicate this source is a blazar. The peculiar characteristic of this blazar, which daunted previous classification attempts, is that we appear to be observing down a precessing jet, the mean orientation of which is aligned with us almost exactly.
  • To study statistical properties of different classes of sources, it is necessary to observe a sample that is free of selection effects. To do this, we initiated a project to observe a complete sample of radio galaxies selected from the B2 Catalogue of Radio Sources and the Third Cambridge Revised Catalogue (3CR), with no selection constraint on the nuclear properties. We named this sample "the Bologna Complete Sample" (BCS). We present new VLBI observations at 5 and 1.6 GHz for 33 sources drawn from a sample not biased toward orientation. By combining these data with those in the literature, information on the parsec-scale morphology is available for a total of 76 of 94 radio sources with a range in radio power and kiloparsec-scale morphologies. The fraction of two-sided sources at milliarcsecond resolution is high (30%), compared to the fraction found in VLBI surveys selected at centimeter wavelengths, as expected from the predictions of unified models. The parsec-scale jets are generally found to be straight and to line up with the kiloparsec-scale jets. A few peculiar sources are discussed in detail.