• We use the largest sample of z~6 galaxies to date from the first four Hubble Frontier Fields clusters to set constraints on the shape of the z~6 luminosity functions (LFs) to fainter than Muv=-14 mag. We quantify, for the first time, the impact of magnification uncertainties on LF results and thus provide more realistic constraints than other recent work. Our simulations reveal that for the highly-magnified sources the systematic uncertainties can become extremely large fainter than -14 mag, reaching several orders of magnitude at 95% confidence at ~-12 mag. Our new forward-modeling formalism incorporates the impact of magnification uncertainties into the LF results by exploiting the availability of many independent magnification models for the same cluster. One public magnification model is used to construct a mock high-redshift galaxy sample that is then analyzed using the other magnification models to construct a LF. Large systematic errors occur at high magnifications (mu>30) because of differences between the models. The volume densities we derive for faint (>-17 mag) sources are ~3-4x lower than one recent report and give a faint-end slope alpha=-1.92+/-0.04, which is 3.0-3.5sigma shallower (including or not including the size uncertainties, respectively). We introduce a new curvature parameter delta to model the faint end of the LF and demonstrate that the observations permit (at 68% confidence) a turn-over at z~6 in the range -15.3 to -14.2 mag, depending on the assumed lensing model. The present consideration of magnification errors and new size determinations raise doubts about previous reports regarding the form of the LF at >-14 mag. We discuss the implications of our turn-over constraints in the context of recent theoretical predictions.
  • We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. Yet, we cannot really assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first such size constraints with 2 new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly-magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy's size. Only the most compact galaxies will remain detectable in regions of high shear (vs. a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we carefully quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 faint high-magnification mu>10 z~2-8 galaxies seen behind the first 4 HFF clusters. This can only be the case if such faint (~-15 mag) galaxies have significantly smaller sizes than luminous galaxies. We constrain their half-light radii to be <~30 mas (<160-240 pc). As a 2nd size probe, we rotate and stack 26 faint high-magnification sources along the major shear axis. Less elongation is found than even for objects with an intrinsic half-light radius of 10 mas. Together these results indicate that extremely faint z~2-8 galaxies have near point-source profiles in the HFF dataset (half-light radii conservatively <30 mas and likely 5-10 mas). These results suggest smaller completeness corrections and hence much lower volume densities for faint z~2-8 galaxies and shallower faint-end slopes than have been derived in many recent studies (by factors of ~2-3 and by dalpha>~0.1-0.3).
  • The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • We present the first results on the search for very bright (M_AB -21) galaxies at redshift z~8 from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. BoRG is a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 pure-parallel survey that is obtaining images on random lines of sight at high Galactic latitudes in four filters (F606W, F098M, F125W, F160W), with integration times optimized to identify galaxies at z>7.5 as F098M-dropouts. We discuss here results from a search area of approximately 130 arcmin^2 over 23 BoRG fields, complemented by six other pure-parallel WFC3 fields with similar filters. This new search area is more than two times wider than previous WFC3 observations at z~8. We identify four F098M-dropout candidates with high statistical confidence (detected at greater than 8sigma confidence in F125W). These sources are among the brightest candidates currently known at z~8 and approximately ten times brighter than the z=8.56 galaxy UDFy-38135539. They thus represent ideal targets for spectroscopic followup observations and could potentially lead to a redshift record, as our color selection includes objects up to z~9. However, the expected contamination rate of our sample is about 30% higher than typical searches for dropout galaxies in legacy fields, such as the GOODS and HUDF, where deeper data and additional optical filters are available to reject contaminants.
  • We present the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy Survey in the Extended CDF-South (SIMPLE), which consists of deep IRAC observations covering the ~1,600 arcmin^2 area surrounding GOODS-S. The limiting magnitudes of the SIMPLE IRAC mosaics typically are 23.8, 23.6, 21.9, and 21.7, at 3.6 um, 4.5 um, 5.8 um, and 8.0 um, respectively (5-sigma total point source magnitudes in AB). The SIMPLE IRAC images are combined with the 10'x15' GOODS IRAC mosaics in the center. We give detailed descriptions of the observations, data reduction, and properties of the final images, as well as the detection and photometry methods used to build a catalog. Using published optical and near-infrared data from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC), we construct an IRAC-selected catalog, containing photometry in UBVRIz'JHK, [3.6 um], [4.5 um], [5.8 um], and [8.0 um]. The catalog contains 43,782 sources with S/N > 5 at 3.6 um, 19,993 of which have 13-band photometry. We compare this catalog to the publicly available MUSYC and FIREWORKS catalogs and discuss the differences. Using a high signal-to-noise sub-sample of 3,391 sources with ([3.6] + [4.5])/2 < 21.2, we investigate the star formation rate history of massive galaxies out to z ~ 1.8. We find that at z ~ 1.8 at least 30% +/-7% of the most massive galaxies (Mstar > 10^11 Msol) are passively evolving, in agreement with earlier results from surveys covering less area.
  • With a complete, mass-selected sample of quiescent galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), we study the stellar populations of the oldest and most massive galaxies (>10^11 Msun) to high redshift. The sample includes 570 quiescent galaxies selected based on their extinction-corrected U-V colors out to z=2.2, with accurate photometric redshifts, sigma_z/(1+z)~2%, and rest-frame colors, sigma_U-V~0.06 mag. We measure an increase in the intrinsic scatter of the rest-frame U-V colors of quiescent galaxies with redshift. This scatter in color arises from the spread in ages of the quiescent galaxies, where we see both relatively quiescent red, old galaxies and quiescent blue, younger galaxies towards higher redshift. The trends between color and age are consistent with the observed composite rest-frame spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these galaxies. The composite SEDs of the reddest and bluest quiescent galaxies are fundamentally different, with remarkably well-defined 4000A- and Balmer-breaks, respectively. Some of the quiescent galaxies may be up to 4 times older than the average age- and up to the age of the universe, if the assumption of solar metallicity is correct. By matching the scatter predicted by models that include growth of the red sequence by the transformation of blue galaxies to the observed intrinsic scatter, the data indicate that most early-type galaxies formed their stars at high redshift with a burst of star formation prior to migrating to the red sequence. The observed U-V color evolution with redshift is weaker than passive evolution predicts; possible mechanisms to slow the color evolution include increasing amounts of dust in quiescent galaxies towards higher redshift, red mergers at z<1, and a frosting of relatively young stars from star formation at later times.
  • The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z=6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function measured at z=5 and z=4. We then predict the luminosity function at z>=7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z>6.5 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the luminosity function: alpha(z>8)< -1.9 compared to alpha=-1.74 at z=6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L_{*}> 10^{-4}) might provide >75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f_{esc}~0.2, clumping factor C~5, top heavy-IMF and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z>8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z>6, but a smaller C/f_{esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the WMAP measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L_* galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z>6 than today.
  • We present a first morphological study of z~7-8 Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs) from Oesch et al. 2009 and Bouwens et al. 2009 detected in ultra-deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep field (HUDF) by the HUDF09 program. With an average intrinsic size of 0.7+-0.3 kpc these galaxies are found to be extremely compact having an average observed surface brightness of mu_J ~= 26 mag arcsec^(-2), and only two out of the full sample of 16 z~7 galaxies show extended features with resolved double cores. By comparison to lower redshift LBGs it is found that only little size evolution takes place from z~7 to z~6, while galaxies between z~4-5 show more extended wings in their apparent profiles. The average size scales as (1+z)^(-m) with m=1.12+-0.17 for galaxies with luminosities in the range (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} and with m=1.32+-0.52 for (0.12-0.3)L*_{z=3}, consistent with galaxies having constant comoving sizes. The peak of the size distribution changes only slowly from z~7 to z~4. However, a tail of larger galaxies (>~ 1.2 kpc) is gradually built up towards later cosmic times, possibly via hierarchical build-up or via enhanced accretion of cold gas. Additionally, the average star-formation surface density of LBGs with luminosities (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} is nearly constant at Sigma_{SFR}=1.9 Msun/yr/kpc^2 over the entire redshift range z~4-7 suggesting similar star-formation efficiencies at these early epochs. The above evolutionary trends seem to hold out to z~8 though the sample is still small and possibly incomplete.
  • We report on the discovery of three bright, strongly-lensed objects behind Abell 1703 and CL0024+16 from a dropout search over 25 square arcminutes of deep NICMOS data, with deep ACS optical coverage. They are undetected in the deep ACS images below 8500 A and have clear detections in the J and H bands. Fits to the ACS, NICMOS and IRAC data yield robust photometric redshifts in the range z~6-7 and largely rule out the possibility that they are low-redshift interlopers. All three objects are extended, and resolved into a pair of bright knots. The bright i-band dropout in Abell 1703 has an H-band AB magnitude of 23.9, which makes it one of the brightest known galaxy candidates at z>5.5. Our model fits suggest a young, massive galaxy only ~ 60 million years old with a mass of ~ 1E10 solar mass. The dropout galaxy candidates behind CL0024+16 are separated by 2.5" (~ 2 kpc in the source plane), and have H-band AB magnitudes of 25.0 and 25.6. Lensing models of CL0024+16 suggest that the objects have comparable intrinsic magnitudes of AB ~ 27.3, approximately one magnitude fainter than L* at z~6.5. Their similar redshifts, spectral energy distribution, and luminosities, coupled with their very close proximity on the sky, suggest that they are spatially associated, and plausibly are physically bound. Combining this sample with two previously reported, similarly magnified galaxy candidates at z~6-8, we find that complex systems with dual nuclei may be a common feature of high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present deep HST/ACS observations in g,r,i,z towards the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942 and its overdensity of >30 spectroscopically confirmed Lya emitters (LAEs). We select 66 g-band dropouts to z=27, 6 of which are also a LAE. Although our color-color selection results in a relatively broad redshift range centered on z=4.1, the field of TN J1338-1942 is richer than the average field at the >5 sigma significance, based on a comparison with GOODS. The angular distribution is filamentary with about half of the objects clustered near the radio galaxy, and a small, excess signal (2 sigma) in the projected pair counts at separations of <10" is interpreted as being due to physical pairs. The LAEs are young (a few x 10^7 yr), small (<r_50> = 0.13") galaxies, and we derive a mean stellar mass of ~10^8-9 Msun based on a stacked K-band image. We determine star formation rates, sizes, morphologies, and color-magnitude relations of the g-dropouts and find no evidence for a difference between galaxies near TN J1338-1942 and in the field. We conclude that environmental trends as observed in clusters at much lower redshift are either not yet present, or are washed out by the relatively broad selection in redshift. The large galaxy overdensity, its corresponding mass overdensity and the sub-clustering at the approximate redshift of TN J1338-1942 suggest the assemblage of a >10^14 Msun structure, confirming that it is possible to find and study cluster progenitors in the linear regime at z>4.
  • We measure the obscured star formation in z~1 early-type galaxies. This constrains the influence of star formation on their optical/near-IR colors, which, we found, are redder than predicted by the model by Bruzual & Charlot (2003). From deep ACS imaging we construct a sample of 95 morphologically selected early-type galaxies in the HDF-N and CDF-S with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.85<z<1.15. We measure their 24 micron fluxes from the deep GOODS-MIPS imaging and derive the IR luminosities and star formation rates. The fraction of galaxies with >2 sigma detections (~25 muJy} is 17(-4,+9)%. Of the 15 galaxies with significant detections at least six have an AGN. Stacking the MIPS images of the galaxies without significant detections and adding the detected galaxies without AGN we find an upper limit on the mean star formation rate (SFR) of 5.2+/-3.0 Msol yr^-1, and on the mean specific SFR of 4.6+/-2.2 * 10^-11 yr^-1. Under the assumption that the average SFR will decline at the same rate as the cosmic average, the in situ growth in stellar mass of the early-type galaxy population is less than 14+/-7% between z=1 and the present. We show that the typically low IR luminosity and SFR imply that the effect of obscured star formation (or AGN) on their rest-frame optical/near-IR SEDs is negligible for ~90% of the galaxies in our sample. Hence, their optical/near-IR colors are most likely dominated by evolved stellar populations. This implies that the colors predicted by the Bruzual & Charlot (2003) model for stellar populations with ages similar to those of z~1 early-type galaxies (~1-3 Gyr) are most likely too blue, and that stellar masses of evolved, high-redshift galaxies can be overestimated by up to a factor of ~2.
  • We present a comprehensive mass reconstruction of the rich galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17 at z~0.4 from ACS data, unifying both strong- and weak-lensing constraints. The weak-lensing signal from a dense distribution of background galaxies (~120 per square arcmin) across the cluster enables the derivation of a high-resolution parameter-free mass map. The strongly-lensed objects tightly constrain the mass structure of the cluster inner region on an absolute scale, breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. The mass reconstruction of Cl 0024+17 obtained in such a way is remarkable. It reveals a ringlike dark matter substructure at r~75" surrounding a soft, dense core at r~50". We interpret this peculiar sub-structure as the result of a high-speed line-of-sight collision of two massive clusters 1-2 Gyr ago. Such an event is also indicated by the cluster velocity distribution. Our numerical simulation with purely collisionless particles demonstrates that such density ripples can arise by radially expanding, decelerating particles that originally comprised the pre-collision cores. Cl 0024+17 can be likened to the bullet cluster 1E0657-56, but viewed $along$ the collision axis at a much later epoch. In addition, we show that the long-standing mass discrepancy for Cl 0024+17 between X-ray and lensing can be resolved by treating the cluster X-ray emission as coming from a superposition of two X-ray systems. The cluster's unusual X-ray surface brightness profile that requires a two isothermal sphere description supports this hypothesis.
  • We present ACS/HST coronagraphic observations of HD 100546, a B9.5 star, 103 pc away from the sun, taken in the F435W, F606W, and F814W bands. Scattered light is detected up to 14'' from the star. The observations are consistent with the presence of an extended flattened nebula with the same inclination as the inner disk. The well-known ``spiral arms'' are clearly observed and they trail the rotating disk material. Weaker arms never before reported are also seen. The inter-arm space becomes brighter, but the structures become more neutral in color at longer wavelengths, which is not consistent with models that assume that they are due to the effects of a warped disk. Along the major disk axis, the colors of the scattered-light relative to the star are \Delta (F435W-F606W) ~ 0.0--0.2 mags and \Delta (F435W-F814W)~0.5--1 mags. To explain these colors, we explore the role of asymmetric scattering, reddening, and large minimum sizes on ISM-like grains. We conclude each of these hypotheses by itself cannot explain the colors. The disk colors are similar to those derived for Kuiper Belt objects, suggesting that the same processes responsible for their colors may be at work here. We argue that we are observing only the geometrically thick, optically thin envelope of the disk, while the optically thick disk responsible for the far-IR emission is undetected. The observed spiral arms are then structures on this envelope. The colors indicate that the extended nebulosity is not a remnant of the infalling envelope but reprocessed disk material.
  • We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z = 2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST/ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50 times 40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 M_sun/yr. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centres of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.
  • We study the photometric and structural properties of spectroscopically confirmed members in the two massive X-ray--selected z=0.83 galaxy clusters MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357 using three-band mosaic imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The samples include 105 and 140 members of MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357, respectively, with ACS F775W magnitude < 24.0. We develop a promising new structural classification method, based on a combination of the best-fit Sersic indices and the normalized root-mean-square residuals from the fits; the resulting classes agree well with the visual ones, but are less affected by galaxy orientation. We examine the color--magnitude relations in detail and find that the color residuals correlate with the local mass density measured from our weak lensing maps; we identify a threshold density of $\Sigma \approx 0.1$, in units of the critical density, above which the star formation appears to cease. For RXJ0152-1357, we also find a trend in the color residuals with velocity, resulting from an offset of about 980 km/s in the mean redshifts of the early- and late-type galaxies. Analysis of the color--color diagrams indicates that a range of star formation time-scales are needed to reproduce the loci of the galaxy colors. We also identify some cluster galaxies whose colors can only be explained by large amounts, $A_V \approx 1$ mag, of internal dust extinction. [Abstract shortened]
  • (Abridged) We present a HST/ACS weak-lensing study of RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453, the two most distant (at z=1.26 and z=1.27, respectively) clusters yet measured with weak-lensing. The two clusters are separated by ~4' from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS F775W and F850LP imaging, we detected weak-lensing signals around both clusters at ~4 sigma levels. The mass distribution indicated by the reconstruction map is in good spatial agreement with the cluster galaxies. From the SIS fitting, we determined that RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 have similar projected masses of ~2.0x10^14 solar mass and ~2.1x10^14 solar mass, respectively, within a 0.5 Mpc (~60") aperture radius.
  • We measure the evolution of the rest-frame K-band Fundamental Plane from z=1 to the present by using IRAC imaging of a sample of early-type galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South at z~1 with accurately measured dynamical masses. We find that $M/L_K$ evolves as $\Delta\ln{(M/L_K)}=(-1.18\pm0.10)z$, which is slower than in the B-band ($\Delta\ln{(M/L_B)}=(-1.46\pm0.09)z$). In the B-band the evolution has been demonstrated to be strongly mass dependent. In the K-band we find a weaker trend: galaxies more massive than $M=2\times10^{11}M_{\odot}$ evolve as $\Delta\ln{(M/L_K)}=(-1.01\pm0.16)z$; less massive galaxies evolve as $\Delta\ln{(M/L_K)}=(-1.27\pm0.11)z$. As expected from stellar population models the evolution in $M/L_K$ is slower than the evolution in $M/L_B$. However, when we make a quantitative comparison, we find that the single burst Bruzual-Charlot models do not fit the results well, unless large dust opacities are allowed at z=1. Models with a flat IMF fit better, Maraston models with a different treatment of AGB stars fit best. These results show that the interpretation of rest-frame near-IR photometry is severely hampered by model uncertainties and therefore that the determination of galaxy masses from rest-frame near-IR photometry may be harder than was thought before.
  • We present a comparison of late-type galaxies (Sa and later) in intermediate redshift clusters and the field using ACS imaging of four cluster fields: CL0152-1357, CL1056-0337 (MS1054), CL1604+4304, and CL1604+4321. Concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness parameters are calculated for each galaxy in blue (F606W or F625W) and red (F775W or F814W) filters. Galaxy half-light radii, disk scale lengths, color gradients, and overall color are compared. We find marginally significant differences in the asymmetry distributions of spiral and irregular galaxies in the X-ray luminous and X-ray faint clusters. The massive clusters contain fewer galaxies with large asymmetries. The physical sizes of the cluster and field populations are similar; no significant differences are found in half-light radii or disk scale lengths. The most significant difference is in rest-frame $U-B$ color. Late-type cluster galaxies are significantly redder, $\sim 0.3$ magnitudes at rest-frame $U-B$, than their field counterparts. Moreover, the intermediate-redshift cluster galaxies tend to have blue inward color gradients, in contrast to the field galaxies, but similar to late-type galaxies in low redshift clusters. These blue inward color gradients are likely to be the result of enhanced nuclear star formation rates relative to the outer disk. Based on the significant rest-frame color difference, we conclude that late-type cluster members at $z\sim0.9$ are not a pristine infalling field population; some difference in past and/or current star formation history is already present. This points to high redshift ``groups'', or filaments with densities similar to present-day groups, as the sites where the first major effects of environment are imprinted.
  • We present HST/ACS observations of the most distant radio galaxy known, TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. This radio galaxy has 6 spectroscopically confirmed Lya emitting companion galaxies, and appears to lie within an overdense region. The radio galaxy is marginally resolved in i_775 and z_850 showing continuum emission aligned with the radio axis, similar to what is observed for lower redshift radio galaxies. Both the half-light radius and the UV star formation rate are comparable to the typical values found for Lyman break galaxies at z~4-5. The Lya emitters are sub-L* galaxies, with deduced star formation rates of 1-10 Msun/yr. One of the Lya emitters is only detected in Lya. Based on the star formation rate of ~3 Msun/yr calculated from Lya, the lack of continuum emission could be explained if the galaxy is younger than ~2 Myr and is producing its first stars. Observations in V_606, i_775, and z_850 were used to identify additional Lyman break galaxies associated with this structure. In addition to the radio galaxy, there are 22 V-break (z~5) galaxies with z_850<26.5 (5sigma), two of which are also in the spectroscopic sample. We compare the surface density of 2/arcmin^2 to that of similarly selected V-dropouts extracted from GOODS and the UDF Parallel fields. We find evidence for an overdensity to very high confidence (>99%), based on a counts-in-cells analysis applied to the control field. The excess is suggestive of the V-break objects being associated with a forming cluster around the radio galaxy.
  • Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images of the young binary GG Tauri and its circumbinary disk in V and I bandpasses were obtained in 2002 and are the most detailed of this system to date. The confirm features previously seen in the disk including: a "gap" apparently caused by shadowing from circumstellar material; an asymmetrical distribution of light about the line of sight on the near edge of the disk; enhanced brightness along the near edge of the disk due to forward scattering; and a compact reflection nebula near the secondary star. New features are seen in the ACS images: two short filaments along the disk; localized but strong variations in disk intensity ("gaplets"); and a "spur" or filament extending from the reflection nebulosity near the secondary. The back side of the disk is detected in the V band for the first time. The disk appears redder than the combined light from the stars, which may be explained by a varied distribution of grain sizes. The brightness asymmetries along the disk suggest that it is asymmetrically illuminated by the stars due to extinction by nonuniform circumstellar material or the illuminated surface of the disk is warped by tidal effects (or perhaps both). Localized, time-dependent brightness variations in the disk are also seen.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) weak-lensing and Chandra X-ray analyses of MS 1054-0321 at z=0.83, the most distant and X-ray luminous cluster in the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey (EMSS). The high-resolution mass reconstruction through ACS weak-lensing reveals the complicated dark matter substructure in unprecedented detail, characterized by the three dominant mass clumps with the four or more minor satellite groups within the current ACS field. The direct comparison of the mass map with the Chandra X-ray image shows that the eastern weak-lensing substructure is not present in the X-ray image and, more interestingly, the two X-ray peaks are displaced away from the hypothesized merging direction with respect to the corresponding central and western mass clumps, possibly because of ram pressure. In addition, as observed in our previous weak-lensing study of another high-redshift cluster CL 0152-1357 at z=0.84, the two dark matter clumps of MS 1054-0321 seem to be offset from the galaxy counterparts. We examine the significance of these offsets and discuss a possible scenario, wherein the dark matter clumps might be moving ahead of the cluster galaxies. The non-parametric weak-lensing mass modeling gives a projected mass of M(r<1 Mpc)=(1.02+-0.15)x 10^{15} solar mass, where the uncertainty reflects both the statistical error and the cosmic shear effects. Our temperature measurement of T=8.9_{-0.8}^{+1.0} keV utilizing the newest available low-energy quantum efficiency degradation prescription for the Chandra instrument, together with the isothermal beta description of the cluster (r_c=16"+-15" and beta=0.78+-0.08), yields a projected mass of M(r<1 Mpc)=(1.2+-0.2) x 10^{15} solar mass, consistent with the weak-lensing result.
  • We have obtained a high S/N (22.3 hr integration) UV continuum VLT FORS2 spectrum of an extremely bright (z_850 = 24.3) z = 5.515 +/- 0.003 starforming galaxy (BD38) in the field of the z = 1.24 cluster RDCS 1252.9-2927. This object shows substantial continuum (0.41 +/- 0.02 \muJy at \lambda1300) and low-ionization interstellar absorption features typical of LBGs at lower redshift (z ~ 3); this is the highest redshift LBG confirmed via metal absorption spectral features. The equivalent widths of the absorption features are similar to z ~ 3 strong Ly\alpha absorbers. No noticeable Ly\alpha emission was detected (F <= 1.4 * 10^-18 ergs cm^-2 s^-1, 3\sigma). The half-light radius of this object is 1.6 kpc (0\farcs25) and the star formation rate derived from the rest-frame UV luminosity is SFR_UV = 38 h^-2_0.7 M_sun yr^-1 (142 h^-2_0.7 M_sun yr^-1 corrected for dust extinction). In terms of recent determinations of the z ~ 6 UV luminosity function, this object appears to be 6L*. The Spitzer IRAC fluxes for this object are 23.3 and 23.2 AB mag (corrected for 0.3 mag of cluster lensing) in the 3.6\mu and 4.5\mu channels, respectively, implying a mass of 1-6 * 10^10 M_sun from population synthesis models. This galaxy is brighter than any confirmed z ~ 6 i-dropout to date in the z_850 band, and both the 3.6\mu and 4.5\mu channels, and is the most massive starbursting galaxy known at z > 5. -- Abstract Abridged
  • We present deep optical imaging of the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338--1942 obtained using the ACS on-board HST. The radio galaxy is known to reside within a large galaxy overdensity (both in physical extent and density contrast). There is good evidence that this `protocluster' region is the progenitor of a present-day rich galaxy cluster. TN J1338 is the dominant galaxy in the protocluster, in terms of size and luminosity and therefore seems destined to evolve into the brightest cluster galaxy. The high spatial-resolution ACS images reveal several kpc-scale features within and around the radio galaxy. The continuum light is aligned with the radio axis and is resolved into two clumps in the i-band and z-band bands. These components have luminosities ~10^9 L_sun and sizes of a few kpc. The estimated star-formation rate for the whole radio galaxy is ~200 M_sun/yr. A simple model in which the jet has triggered star-formation in these continuum knots is consistent with the available data. An unusual feature is seen in Lyman-alpha emission. A wedge-shaped extension emanates from the radio galaxy perpendicularly to the radio axis. This `wedge' naturally connects to the surrounding, asymmetric, large-scale (~100 kpc) Lyman-alpha halo. We posit that the wedge is a starburst-driven superwind, associated with the first major epoch of formation of the brightest cluster galaxy. The shock and wedge are examples of feedback processes due to both AGN and star-formation in the earliest stages of massive galaxy formation.
  • We present an analysis of the Fundamental Plane for a sample of 27 field early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6<z<1.15. The galaxies in this sample have high S/N spectra obtained at the VLT and high resolution imaging from the ACS. We find that the mean evolution in M/L of our sample is $Delta ln (M/L_B) = -1.74+/-0.16z$, with a large galaxy-to-galaxy scatter. This value can be too low by 0.3 due to selection effects, resulting in $Delta ln (M/L_B) = -1.43+/-0.16z$. The strong correlation between M/L and rest-frame color indicates that the observed scatter is not due to measurement errors, but due to intrinsic differences between the stellar populations of the galaxies. This pace of evolution is much faster than the evolution of cluster galaxies. However, we find that the measured M/L evolution strongly depends on galaxy mass. For galaxies with masses $M>2 x 10^11 Msol$, we find no significant difference between the evolution of field and cluster galaxies: $Delta ln (M/L_B) = -1.20+/-0.18z for field galaxies and $Delta ln (M/L_B) = -1.12+/-0.06z$ for cluster galaxies. The relation between the measured M/L evolution and mass is partially due to selection effects. However, even when taking selection effects into account, we still find a relation between M/L evolution and mass, which is most likely caused by a lower mean age and a larger intrinsic scatter for low mass galaxies. Results from lensing early-type galaxies, which are mass-selected, show a very similar trend with mass. This, combined with our findings, provides evidence for down-sizing. Previous studies of the rate of evolution of field early-type galaxies found a large range of mutually exclusive values. We show that these differences are largely caused by the differences between fitting methods. (Abridged)
  • We present a weak lensing analysis of one of the most distant massive galaxy cluster known, RDCS 1252.9-2927 at z=1.24, using deep images from the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By taking advantage of the depth and of the angular resolution of the ACS images, we detect for the first time at z>1 a clear weak lensing signal in both the i (F775W) and z (F850LP) filters. We measure a 5-\sigma signal in the i band and a 3-\sigma signal in the shallower z band image. The two radial mass profiles are found to be in very good agreement with each other, and provide a measurement of the total mass of the cluster inside a 1Mpc radius of M(<1Mpc) = (8.0 +/- 1.3) x 10^14 M_\odot in the current cosmological concordance model h =0.70, \Omega_m=0.3, \Omega_\Lambda=0.7, assuming a redshift distribution of background galaxies as inferred from the Hubble Deep Fields surveys. A weak lensing signal is detected out to the boundary of our field (3' radius, corresponding to 1.5Mpc at the cluster redshift). We detect a small offset between the centroid of the weak lensing mass map and the brightest cluster galaxy, and we discuss the possible origin of this discrepancy. The cumulative weak lensing radial mass profile is found to be in good agreement with the X-ray mass estimate based on Chandr and XMM-Newton observations, at least out to R_500=0.5Mpc.