• The Sydney University Giant Air-shower Recorder (SUGAR) measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays reconstructed from muon-detector readings, while the Pierre Auger Observatory, looking at the same Southern sky, uses the calorimetric fluorescence method for the same purpose. Comparison of their two spectra allows us to reconstruct the empirical dependence of the number of muons in the shower on the primary energy for energies between $10^{17}$ and $10^{18.5}$ eV. We compare this dependence with the predictions of hadronic interaction models \mbox{QGSJET-II-04} and \mbox{EPOS-LHC}. The empirically determined number of muons with energies above 0.75 GeV exceeds the simulated one by the factors $\sim$1.67 and $\sim$1.28 for $10^{17}$ eV proton and iron primaries, respectively. The muon excess grows moderately with the primary energy, increasing by an additional factor of $\sim 1.2$ for $10^{18.5}$ eV primaries.
  • Some discrepancies have been reported between observed and simulated muon content of extensive air showers: the number of observed muons exceeded the expectations in HiRes-MIA, Yakutsk and Pierre Auger Observatory data. Here, we analyze the data of the Moscow State University Extensive Air Shower (EAS-MSU) array on E_mu>~10 GeV muons in showers caused by ~(10^17-10^18) eV primary particles and demonstrate that they agree with simulations (QGSJET-II-04 hadronic interaction model) once the primary composition inferred from the surface-detector data is assumed.
  • Results of the search for $\sim (10^{16} - 10^{17.5})$ eV primary cosmic-ray photons with the data of the Moscow State University (MSU) Extensive Air Shower (EAS) array are reported. The full-scale reanalysis of the data with modern simulations of the installation does not confirm previous indications of the excess of gamma-ray candidate events. Upper limits on the corresponding gamma-ray flux are presented. The limits are the most stringent published ones at energies $\sim 10^{17}$ eV.
  • The Tunka-Rex experiment (Tunka Radio Extension) has been deployed in 2012 at the Tunka Valley (Republic of Buryatia, Russia). Its purpose is to investigate methods for the energy spectrum and the mass composition of high-energy cosmic rays based on the radio emission of air showers. Tunka-Rex is an array of 25 radio antennas distributed over an area of 3 km^2. The most important feature of the Tunka-Rex is that the air-shower radio emission is measured in coincidence with the Tunka-133 installation, which detects the Cherenkov radiation generated by the same atmospheric showers. Joint measurements of the radio emission and the Cherenkov light provide a unique opportunity for cross calibration of both calorimetric detection methods. The main goal of Tunka-Rex is to determine the precision for the reconstruction of air-shower parameters using the radio detection technique. In this article we present the current status of Tunka-Rex and first results, including reconstruction methods for parameters of the primary cosmic rays.
  • Tunka-Rex, the Tunka Radio extension at the TAIGA facility (Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy) in Siberia, has recently been expanded to a total number 63 SALLA antennas, most of them distributed on an area of one square kilometer. In the first years of operation, Tunka-Rex was solely triggered by the co-located air-Cherenkov array Tunka-133. The correlation of the measurements by both detectors has provided direct experimental proof that radio arrays can measure the position of the shower maximum. The precision achieved so far is 40 g/cm^2, and several methodical improvements are under study. Moreover, the cross-comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that the energy reconstruction of Tunka-Rex is precise to 15 %, with a total accuracy of 20 % including the absolute energy scale. By using exactly the same calibration source for Tunka-Rex and LOPES, the energy scale of their host experiments, Tunka-133 and KASCADE-Grande, respectively, can be compared even more accurately with a remaining uncertainty of about 10 %. The main goal of Tunka-Rex for the next years is a study of the cosmic-ray mass composition in the energy range above 100 PeV: For this purpose, Tunka-Rex now is triggered also during daytime by the particle detector array Tunka-Grande featuring surface and underground scintillators for electron and muon detection.
  • Observations by Fermi LAT enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with the set of 89 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than radio-quiet one and is located at smaller galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most of radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio-band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi LAT data alone using all point sources from 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike preceding blind search, the present catalog is constructed with novel semi-coherent method and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in the catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 26 of which are radio-quiet. There are no statistically significant differences in age and galactic latitude distributions for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the rotation period distributions are marginally different with $2.4\sigma$ pre-trial statistical significance. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as $\epsilon_{RQ}=63\pm 8\%$. The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnitosphere models, while the Polar cap models are disfavored.
  • The radio technique is a promising method for detection of cosmic-ray air showers of energies around $100\,$PeV and higher with an array of radio antennas. Since the amplitude of the radio signal can be measured absolutely and increases with the shower energy, radio measurements can be used to determine the air-shower energy on an absolute scale. We show that calibrated measurements of radio detectors operated in coincidence with host experiments measuring air showers based on other techniques can be used for comparing the energy scales of these host experiments. Using two approaches, first via direct amplitude measurements, and second via comparison of measurements with air shower simulations, we compare the energy scales of the air-shower experiments Tunka-133 and KASCADE-Grande, using their radio extensions, Tunka-Rex and LOPES, respectively. Due to the consistent amplitude calibration for Tunka-Rex and LOPES achieved by using the same reference source, this comparison reaches an accuracy of approximately $10\,\%$ - limited by some shortcomings of LOPES, which was a prototype experiment for the digital radio technique for air showers. In particular we show that the energy scales of cosmic-ray measurements by the independently calibrated experiments KASCADE-Grande and Tunka-133 are consistent with each other on this level.
  • The Moscow State University Extensive Air Shower (EAS-MSU) array studied high-energy cosmic rays with primary energies ~(1-500) PeV in the Northern hemisphere. The EAS-MSU data are being revisited following recently found indications to an excess of muonless showers, which may be interpreted as the first observation of cosmic gamma rays at ~100 PeV. In this paper, we present a complete Monte-Carlo model of the surface detector which results in a good agreement between data and simulations. The model allows us to study the performance of the detector and will be used to obtain physical results in further studies.
  • We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies $E \gtrsim 100 $PeV applying a method using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. An event-to-event comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. The Tunka-Rex reconstruction methods and absolute scales have been tuned on CoREAS simulations and yield energy and $X_{\mathrm{max}}$ values consistent with the Tunka-133 measurements. The results of two independent measurement seasons agree within statistical uncertainties, which gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of $15 %$, and exhibits a $20 %$ uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For $X_{\mathrm{max}}$, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radio measurements with a different, established method. At the moment, the $X_{\mathrm{max}}$ resolution of Tunka-Rex is approximately $40 $g/cm$^2$. This resolution can probably be improved by deploying additional antennas and by further development of the reconstruction methods, since the present analysis does not yet reveal any principle limitations.
  • We perform a blind search for the variability of the gamma-ray sky in the energy range E>1 GeV using 308 weeks of the Fermi-LAT data. We use the technique based on the comparison of the weekly photon counts and exposures in sky pixels by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We consider the flux variations in the region significant if statistical probability of uniformity is less than $4\times10^{-6}$, which corresponds to 0.05 false detections in the whole set of 12288 pixels. Close inspection of the detected variable regions result in identification of 8 sources without previous known variability. Two of them are included in the second Fermi LAT source catalogue (FBQS J122424.1+243623 and GB6 J0043+3426) and one (3EG J1424+3734) was reported by EGRET and also was included in the First Fermi LAT source catalogue (1FGL), but is missing in the 2FGL. Possible identifications of five other sources are obtained using NED and SIMBAD databases (1RXS J161939.9+765515, PMN J2320-6447, PKS 0226-559, PKS J0030-0211, PMN J0225-2603). These new variable gamma-ray sources demonstrate recurring flaring activity with time scale ~weeks and have hard spectra. Their spectral energy distributions deviate significantly from a simple power-law shape and often peak around ~GeV. These properties of activity are typical for flaring blazars.
  • Tunka-Rex is a radio detector for cosmic-ray air showers in Siberia, triggered by Tunka-133, a co-located air-Cherenkov detector. The main goal of Tunka-Rex is the cross-calibration of the two detectors by measuring the air-Cherenkov light and the radio signal emitted by the same air showers. This way we can explore the precision of the radio-detection technique, especially for the reconstruction of the primary energy and the depth of the shower maximum. The latter is sensitive to the mass of the primary cosmic-ray particles. In this paper we describe the detector setup and explain how electronics and antennas have been calibrated. The analysis of data of the first season proves the detection of cosmic-ray air showers and therefore, the functionality of the detector. We confirm the expected dependence of the detection threshold on the geomagnetic angle and the correlation between the energy of the primary cosmic-ray particle and the radio amplitude. Furthermore, we compare reconstructed amplitudes of radio pulses with predictions from CoREAS simulations, finding agreement within the uncertainties.
  • The Tunka observatory is located close to Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. Its main detector, Tunka-133, is an array of photomultipliers measuring Cherenkov light of air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the energy range of approximately $10^{16}-10^{18}\,$eV. In the last years, several extensions have been built at the Tunka site, e.g., a scintillator array named Tunka-Grande, a sophisticated air-Cherenkov-detector prototype named HiSCORE, and the radio extension Tunka-Rex. Tunka-Rex started operation in October 2012 and currently features 44 antennas distributed over an area of about $3\,$km$^2$, which measure the radio emission of the same air showers detected by Tunka-133 and Tunka-Grande. Tunka-Rex is a technological demonstrator that the radio technique can provide an economic extension of existing air-shower arrays. The main scientific goal is the cross-calibration with the air-Cherenkov measurements. By this cross-calibration, the precision for the reconstruction of the energy and mass of the primary cosmic-ray particles can be determined. Finally, Tunka-Rex can be used for cosmic-ray physics at energies close to $1\,$EeV, where the standard Tunka-133 analysis is limited by statistics. In contrast to the air-Cherenkov measurements, radio measurements are not limited to dark, clear nights and can provide an order of magnitude larger exposure.
  • The Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex) is an array of 44 radio antenna stations, distributed over 3 km$^{2}$, constituting a radio detector for air showers with an energy threshold around 10$^{17}$ eV. It is an extension to Tunka-133, an air-Cherenkov detector in Siberia, which is used as an external trigger for Tunka-Rex and provides a reliable reconstruction of energy and shower maximum. Each antenna station consists of two perpendicularly aligned active antennas, called SALLAs. An antenna calibration of the SALLA with a commercial reference source enables us to reconstruct the detected radio signal on an absolute scale. Since the same reference source was used for the calibration of LOPES and, in a calibration campaign in 2014, also for LOFAR, these three experiments now have a consistent calibration and, therefore, absolute scale. This was a key ingredient to resolve a longer standing contradiction between measurements of two calibrated experiments. We will present how the calibration was performed and compare radio measurements of air showers from Tunka-Rex to model calculations with the radio simulation code CoREAS, confirming it within the scale uncertainty of the calibration of 18%.
  • Tunka-Rex is the radio extension of the Tunka cosmic-ray observatory in Siberia close to Lake Baikal. Since October 2012 Tunka-Rex measures the radio signal of air-showers in coincidence with the non-imaging air-Cherenkov array Tunka-133. Furthermore, this year additional antennas will go into operation triggered by the new scintillator array Tunka-Grande measuring the secondary electrons and muons of air showers. Tunka-Rex is a demonstrator for how economic an antenna array can be without losing significant performance: we have decided for simple and robust SALLA antennas, and we share the existing DAQ running in slave mode with the PMT detectors and the scintillators, respectively. This means that Tunka-Rex is triggered externally, and does not need its own infrastructure and DAQ for hybrid measurements. By this, the performance and the added value of the supplementary radio measurements can be studied, in particular, the precision for the reconstructed energy and the shower maximum in the energy range of approximately $10^{17}-10^{18}\,$eV. Here we show first results on the energy reconstruction indicating that radio measurements can compete with air-Cherenkov measurements in precision. Moreover, we discuss future plans for Tunka-Rex.
  • We revisit constraints on the (pseudo)conformal Universe from the non-observation of statistical anisotropy in the Planck data. The quadratic maximal likelihood estimator is applied to the Planck temperature maps at frequencies 143 GHz and 217 GHz as well as their cross-correlation. The strongest constraint is obtained in the scenario of the (pseudo)conformal Universe with a long intermediate evolution after conformal symmetry breaking. In terms of the relevant parameter (coupling constant), the limit is h^2 <0.0013 at 95% C.L. (using the cross-estimator). The analogous limit is much weaker in the scenario without the intermediate stage (h^2 \ln \frac{H_0}{\Lambda}<0.52) allowing the coupling constant to be of order one. In the latter case, the non-Gaussianity in the 4-point function appears to be a more promising signature.
  • The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed more than a hundred of gamma-ray pulsars, about one third of which are radio-quiet, i.e. not detected at radio frequencies. The most of radio-loud pulsars are detected by Fermi LAT by using the radio timing models, while the radio-quiet ones are discovered in a blind search. The difference in the techniques introduces an observational selection bias and, consequently, the direct comparison of populations is complicated. In order to produce an unbiased sample, we perform a blind search of gamma-ray pulsations using Fermi-LAT data alone. No radio data or observations at optical or X-ray frequencies are involved in the search process. We produce a gamma-ray selected catalog of 25 non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars found in a blind search, including 16 radio-quiet and 9 radio-loud pulsars. This results in the direct measurement of the fraction of radio-quiet pulsars $\varepsilon_{RQ} = 64\pm 10\%$, which is in agreement with the existing estimates from the population modeling in the outer magnetosphere model. The Polar cap models are disfavored due to a lower expected fraction and the prediction of age dependence. The age, gamma-ray energy flux, spin-down luminosity and sky location distributions of the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars from the catalog do not demonstrate any statistically significant difference. The results indicate that the radio-quiet and radio-loud pulsars belong to one and the same population. The catalog shows no evidence for the radio beam evolution.
  • The expected opacity of the intergalactic space limits the mean free path of TeV gamma rays to dozens of Megaparsecs. However, TeV photons from numerous more distant sources have been detected. This might be interpreted, in each particular case, in terms of hardening of the emitted spectrum caused by presently unknown mechanisms at work in the sources. Here we show that this interpretation is not supported by the analysis of the ensemble of all observed sources. In the frameworks of an infrared-background model with the lowest opacity, we reconstruct the emitted spectra of distant blazars and find that upward spectral breaks appear precisely at those energies where absorption effects are essential. Since these energies are very different for similar sources located at various distances, we conclude that the breaks are artefacts of the incorrect account of absorption and, therefore, the opacity of the Universe for gamma rays is overestimated even in the most conservative model. This implies that some novel physical or astrophysical phenomena should affect long-distance propagation of gamma rays. A scenario in which a part of energetic photons is converted to an inert new particle in the vicinity of the source and reconverts back close to the observer does not contradict to our results. [abridged]
  • T. Abu-Zayyad, R. Aida, M. Allen, R. Anderson, R. Azuma, E. Barcikowski, J.W. Belz, D.R. Bergman, S.A. Blake, R. Cady, B.G. Cheon, J. Chiba, M. Chikawa, E.J. Cho, W.R. Cho, H. Fujii, T. Fujii, T. Fukuda, M. Fukushima, D. Gorbunov, W. Hanlon, K. Hayashi, Y. Hayashi, N. Hayashida, K. Hibino, K. Hiyama, K. Honda, T. Iguchi, D. Ikeda, K. Ikuta, N. Inoue, T. Ishii, R. Ishimori, D. Ivanov, S. Iwamoto, C.C.H. Jui, K. Kadota, F. Kakimoto, O. Kalashev, T. Kanbe, K. Kasahara, H. Kawai, S. Kawakami, S. Kawana, E. Kido, H.B. Kim, H.K. Kim, J.H. Kim, J.H. Kim, K. Kitamoto, S. Kitamura, Y. Kitamura, K. Kobayashi, Y. Kobayashi, Y. Kondo, K. Kuramoto, V. Kuzmin, Y.J. Kwon, J. Lan, S.I. Lim, S. Machida, K. Martens, T. Matsuda, T. Matsuura, T. Matsuyama, J.N. Matthews, M. Minamino, K. Miyata, Y. Murano, I. Myers, K. Nagasawa, S. Nagataki, T. Nakamura, S.W. Nam, T. Nonaka, S. Ogio, M. Ohnishi, H. Ohoka, K. Oki, D. Oku, T. Okuda, A. Oshima, S. Ozawa, I.H. Park, M.S. Pshirkov, D.C. Rodriguez, S.Y. Roh, G.I. Rubtsov, D. Ryu, H. Sagawa, N. Sakurai, A.L. Sampson, L.M. Scott, P.D. Shah, F. Shibata, T. Shibata, H. Shimodaira, B.K. Shin, J.I. Shin, T. Shirahama, J.D. Smith, P. Sokolsky, B.T. Stokes, S.R. Stratton, T. Stroman, S. Suzuki, Y. Takahashi, M. Takeda, A. Taketa, M. Takita, Y. Tameda, H. Tanaka, K. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, S.B. Thomas, G.B. Thomson, P. Tinyakov, I. Tkachev, H. Tokuno, T. Tomida, S. Troitsky, Y. Tsunesada, K. Tsutsumi, Y. Tsuyuguchi, Y. Uchihori, S. Udo, H. Ukai, G. Vasiloff, Y. Wada, T. Wong, M. Wood, Y. Yamakawa, R. Yamane, H. Yamaoka, K. Yamazaki, J. Yang, Y. Yoneda, S. Yoshida, H. Yoshii, X. Zhou, R. Zollinger, Z. Zundel
    Dec. 6, 2013 hep-ph, hep-ex, astro-ph.HE
    We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10^19, 10^19.5 and 10^20 eV based on the first three years of data taken.
  • We revisit cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints on the abundance of millicharged particles based on the Planck data. The stringent limit Omega_{mcp}h^2 < 0.001 (95% CL) may be set using the CMB data alone if millicharged particles participate in the acoustic oscillations of baryon-photon plasma at the recombination epoch. The latter condition is valid for a wide region of charges and masses of the particles. Adding the millicharged component to LCDM shifts prefered scalar spectral index of primordial perturbations to somewhat larger values as compared to minimal model, even approaching Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum under some assumptions.
  • The current status of searches for ultra-high energy neutrinos and photons using air showers is reviewed. Regarding both physics and observational aspects, possible future research directions are indicated.
  • Tunka-Rex, the Tunka radio extension, is an array of 20 antennas at the Tunka experiment close to Lake Baikal in Siberia. It started operation on 08 October 2012. The antennas are connected directly to the data acquisition of the Tunka main detector, a 1 square-km large array of 133 non-imaging photomultipliers observing the Cherenkov light of air showers in dark and clear nights. This allows to cross-calibrate the radio signal with the air-Cherenkov signal of the same air showers - in particular with respect to the energy and the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, Xmax. Consequently, we can test whether in rural regions with low radio background the practically achievable radio precision comes close to the precision of the established fluorescence and air-Cherenkov techniques. At a mid-term perspective, due to its higher duty-cycle, Tunka-Rex can enhance the effective observing time of Tunka by an order of magnitude, at least in the interesting energy range above 100 PeV. Moreover, Tunka-Rex is very cost-effective, e.g., by using economic Short Aperiodic Loaded Loop Antennas (SALLAs). Thus, the results of Tunka-Rex and the comparison to other sophisticated radio arrays will provide crucial input for future large-scale cosmic-ray observatories, for which measurement precision as well as costs per area have to be optimized. In this paper we shortly describe the Tunka-Rex setup and discuss the technical and scientific goals of Tunka-Rex.
  • Comparing the signals measured by the surface and underground scintillator detectors of the Yakutsk Extensive Air Shower Array, we place upper limits on the integral flux and the fraction of primary cosmic-ray photons with energies E > 10^18 eV, E > 2*10^18 eV and E > 4*10^18 eV. The large collected statistics of the showers measured by large-area muon detectors provides a sensitivity to photon fractions < 10^-2, thus achieving precision previously unreachable at ultra-high energies.
  • We estimate the sensitivity of various experiments detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays to primary photons with energies above 10^19 eV. We demonstrate that the energy of a primary photon may be significantly (up to a factor of ~ 10) under- or overestimated for particular primary energies and arrival directions. We consider distortion of the reconstructed cosmic-ray spectrum for the photonic component. As an example, we use these results to constrain the parameter space of models of superheavy dark matter by means of both the observed spectra and available limits on the photon content. We find that a significant contribution of ultra-high-energy particles (photons and protons) from decays of superheavy dark matter is allowed by all these constraints.
  • We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.
  • The most common way to simplify extensive Monte-Carlo simulations of air showers is to use the thinning approximation. We study its effect on the physical parameters reconstructed from simulated showers. To this end, we have created a library of showers simulated without thinning with energies from 10^17 eV to 10^18 eV, various zenith angles and primaries. This library is publicly available. Physically interesting applications of the showers simulated without thinning are discussed. Observables reconstructed from these showers are compared to those obtained with the thinning approximation. The amount of artificial fluctuations introduced by thinning is estimated. A simple method, multisampling, is suggested which results in a controllable suppression of artificial fluctuations and at the same time requires less demanding computational resources as compared to the usual thinning.