• We describe the afterglows of long GRBs within the context of a binary-driven hypernova (BdHN). In this paradigm afterglows originate from the interaction between a newly born neutron star (vNS), created by an Ic supernova (SN), and a mildly relativistic ejecta of a hypernova (HN). Such a HN in turn results from the impact of the GRB on the original SN Ic. The mildly relativistic expansion velocity of the afterglow ($\Gamma$~3) is determined, using our model indipendent approach, from the thermal emission between 196s and 461s. The observed power-law afterglow in the optical and X-ray bands is shown to arise from the synchrotron emission of relativistic electrons in the expanding magnetized HN ejecta. Two components contribute to the injected energy: the kinetic energy of the mildly relativistic expanding HN and the rotational energy of the fast rotating highly magnetized vNS. As an example we reproduce the observed afterglow of GRB130427A [...]. Initially, the emission is dominated by the loss of kinetic energy of the HN component. After $10^5$s the emission is dominated by the loss of rotational energy of the vNS, for which we adopt an initial rotation period of 2ms and a dipole/quadrupole magnetic field of $\lesssim7x10^{12}$G/~$10^{14}$G. This approach opens new views on the roles of the GRB interaction with the SN ejecta, on the mildly relativistic kinetic energy of the HN and on the pulsar-like phenomena of the vNS. This scenario differs from the current ultra-relativistic treatments of the afterglows and is consistent with the current observations of the mildly relativistic expansions determined in a model independent approach in the Hard X-ray flares (HXFs), extended thermal emission (ETE), soft X-ray flares (SXFs) and flare-plateau-afterglow (FPA) phase in the BdHN, as well as of the thermal emission between 196s and 461s first presented in this paper.
  • We address the significance of the observed GeV emission from \textit{Fermi}-LAT on the understanding of the structure of long GRBs. We examine 82 X-ray Flashs (XRFs), in none of them GeV radiation is observed, adding evidence to the absence of a black hole (BH) formation in their merging process. By examining $329$ Binary-driven Hypernovae (BdHNe) we find that out of $48$ BdHNe observable by \textit{Fermi}-LAT in \textit{only} $21$ of them the GeV emission is observed. The Gev emission in BdHNE follows a universal power-law relation between the luminosity and time, when measured in the rest frame of the source. The power-law index in BdHNe is of $-1.20 \pm 0.04$, very similar to the one discovered in S-GRBs, $-1.29 \pm 0.06$. The GeV emission originates from the newly-born BH and allows to determine its mass and spin. We further give the first evidence for observing a new GRB subclass originating from the merging of a hypernova (HN) and an already formed BH binary companion. We conclude that the GeV emission is a necessary and sufficient condition to confirm the presence of a BH in the hypercritical accretion process occurring in a HN. The remaining $27$ BdHNe, recently identified as sources of flaring in X-rays and soft gamma-rays, have no GeV emission. From this and previous works, we infer that the observability of the GeV emission in some BdHNe is hampered by the presence of the HN ejecta. We conclude that the GeV emission can only be detected when emitted within a half-opening angle $\approx$60$^{\circ}$ normal to the orbital plane of the BdHN.
  • Within the classification of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different subclasses we give further evidence that short bursts, originating from binary neutron star (B-NS) progenitors, exist in two subclasses: the short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs) and the short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs). It has already been shown that S-GRFs occur when the B-NS mergers lead to a massive neutron star (M-NS), having the isotropic energy $\lesssim$ $10^{52}$ erg and a soft spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 0.2$--$2$ MeV. Similarly, S-GRBs occur when B-NS merging leads to the formation of a black hole (BH), with isotropic energy $\gtrsim 10^{52}$ erg and a hard spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 2$--$8$ MeV. We here focus on 18 S-GRFs and 6 S-GRBs, all with known or derived cosmological redshifts following \textit{Fermi}-LAT observations. We evidence that \textit{all} S-GRFs have no GeV emission. The S-GRBs \textit{all} have GeV emission and their $0.1$--$100$ GeV luminosity light-curves as a function of time in the rest-frame follow a universal power-law, $L(t)= (0.88\pm 0.13) \times 10^{52}~t^{-(1.29 \pm 0.06)}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. From the mass formula of a Kerr BH we can correspondingly infer for S-GRBs a minimum BH mass in the range of $2.24$--$2.89 M_\odot$ and a corresponding maximum dimensionless spin in the range of $0.18$--$0.33$.
  • Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) theory predicts the abundances of the light elements D, $^3$He, $^4$He and $^7$Li produced in the early universe. The primordial abundances of D and $^4$He inferred from observational data are in good agreement with predictions, however, the BBN theory overestimates the primordial $^7$Li abundance by about a factor of three. This is the so-called "cosmological lithium problem". Solutions to this problem using conventional astrophysics and nuclear physics have not been successful over the past few decades, probably indicating the presence of new physics during the era of BBN. We have investigated the impact on BBN predictions of adopting a generalized distribution to describe the velocities of nucleons in the framework of Tsallis non-extensive statistics. This generalized velocity distribution is characterized by a parameter $q$, and reduces to the usually assumed Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for $q$ = 1. We find excellent agreement between predicted and observed primordial abundances of D, $^4$He and $^7$Li for $1.069\leq q \leq 1.082$, suggesting a possible new solution to the cosmological lithium problem.
  • A rudimentary calculation is employed to evaluate the possible effects of beta- decays of excited-state nuclei on the astrophysical r-process. Single-particle levels calculated with the FRDM are adapted to the calculation of beta-decay rates of these excited-state nuclei. Quantum numbers are determined based on proximity to Nilson model levels. The resulting rates are used in an r-process network calculation in which a supernova hot-bubble model is coupled to an extensive network calculation including all nuclei between the valley of stability and the neutron drip line and with masses A<284. Beta-decay rates are included as functional forms of the environmental temperature. While the decay rate model used is simple and phenomenological, it is consistent across all 3700 nuclei involved in the r-process network calculation. This represents an approximate first estimate to gauge the possible effects of excited-state beta-decays on r-process freeze-out abundances.
  • We reanalyze the allowed parameters for inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis in light of the WMAP constraints on the baryon-to-photon ratio and a recent measurement which has set the neutron lifetime to be 878.5 +/- 0.7 +/- 0.3 seconds. For a set baryon-to-photon ratio the new lifetime reduces the mass fraction of He4 by 0.0015 but does not significantly change the abundances of other isotopes. This enlarges the region of concordance between He4 and deuterium in the parameter space of the baryon-to-photon ratio and the IBBN distance scale. The Li7 abundance can be brought into concordance with observed He4 and deuterium abundances by using depletion factors as high as 9.3. The WMAP constraints, however, severely limit the allowed comoving (T = 100 GK) inhomogeneity distance scale to (1.3 - 2.6)x10^5 cm.
  • We report on numerical results from an independent formalism to describe the quasi-equilibrium structure of nonsynchronous binary neutron stars in general relativity. This is an important independent test of controversial numerical hydrodynamic simulations which suggested that nonsynchronous neutron stars in a close binary can experience compression prior to the last stable circular orbit. We show that, for compact enough stars the interior density increases slightly as irrotational binary neutron stars approach their last orbits. The magnitude of the effect, however, is much smaller than that reported in previous hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We describe a numerical method for calculating the (3+1) dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics of a coalescing neutron-star binary system. The relativistic field equations are solved at each time slice with a spatial 3-metric chosen to be conformally flat. Against this solution to the general relativistic field equations the hydrodynamic variables and gravitational radiation are allowed to respond. The gravitational radiation signal is derived via a multipole expansion of the metric perturbation to the hexadecapole order including both mass and current moments and a correction for the slow motion approximation. Using this expansion, the effect of gravitational radiation on the system evolution can also be recovered by introducing an acceleration term in the matter evolution.
  • We examine the effects on the nuclear neutral current Gamow-Teller (GT) strength of a finite contribution from a polarized strange quark sea. We perform nuclear shell model calculations of the neutral current GT strength for a number of nuclei likely to be present during stellar core collapse. We compare the GT strength when a finite strange quark contribution is included to the strength without such a contribution. As an example, the process of neutral current nuclear de-excitation via $\nu {\overline{\nu}}$ pair production is examined for the two cases.
  • Primordial nucleosynthesis calculations are shown to be able to provide constraints on electroweak baryogenesis which produce a highly inhomogeneous distribution of the baryon-to-photon ratio. Such baryogenesis scenarios overproduce 4He and/or 7Li and can be ruled out whenever a fraction f<3*10e-6(100 GeV/T)^3 of nucleated bubbles of broken-symmetry phase contributes > 10% of the baryon number within the horizon volume.
  • We show that a class of inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis models exist which yield light-element abundances in agreement with observational constraints for baryon-to-photon ratios significantly smaller than those inferred from standard homogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis (HBBN). These inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis models are characterized by a bimodal distribution of baryons in which some regions have a local baryon-to-photon ratio eta=3*10e-10, while the remaining regions are baryon-depleted. HBBN scenarios with primordial (2H+3He)/H<9*10e-5 necessarily require that most baryons be in a dark or non-luminous form, although new observations of a possible high deuterium abundance in Lyman-alpha clouds may relax this requirement somewhat. The models described here present another way to relax this requirement and can even eliminate any lower bound on the baryon-to-photon ratio.
  • We present a detailed study of inhomogeneous Big Bang nucleosynthesis where, for the first time, nuclear reactions are coupled to all significant fluctuation dissipation processes. Theses processes include neutrino heat transport, baryon diffusion, photon diffusive heat transport, and hydrodynamic expansion with photon-electron Thomson drag. Light element abundance yields are presented for broad ranges of initial amplitudes and length scales for spherically condensed fluctuations. The $^2$H, $^3$He, $^4$He, and $^7$Li nucleosynthesis yields are found to be inconsistent with observationally inferred primordial abundances for all but very narrow ranges of fluctuation characteristics. Rapid hydrodynamic expansion of fluctuations late in the nucleosynthesis epoch results in significant destruction of $^7$Li ($^7$Be) only if the baryonic conytribution to the closure density ($\Omega_b$) is less than or comparable to the upper limit on this quantity from homogeneous Big Bang nucleosynthesis. This implies that $^7$Li overproduction will peclude an increase on the upper limit for $\Omega_b$ for any inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis scenarios employing spherically condensed fluctuations.
  • We show that primordial nucleosynthesis in baryon inhomogeneous big-bang models can lead to significant heavy-element production while still satisfying all the light-element abundance constraints including the low lithium abundance observed in population II stars. The parameters which admit this solution arise naturally from the process of neutrino induced inflation of baryon inhomogeneities prior to the epoch of nucleosynthesis. These solutions entail a small fraction of baryons (\le 2\%) in very high density regions with local baryon-to-photon ratio $\eta^h\approx 10^{-4}$, while most baryons are at a baryon-to-photon ratio which optimizes the agreement with light-element abundances. The model would imply a unique signature of baryon inhomogeneities in the early universe, evidenced by the existence of primordial material containing heavy-element products of proton and alpha- burning reactions with an abundance of $[Z]\sim -6 to -4$.
  • We present the results of detailed nuclear shell model calculations of the spin-dependent elastic cross section for neutralinos scattering from \si29 and \ge73. The calculations were performed in large model spaces which adequately describe the configuration mixing in these two nuclei. As tests of the computed nuclear wave functions, we have calculated several nuclear observables and compared them with the measured values and found good agreement. In the limit of zero momentum transfer, we find scattering matrix elements in agreement with previous estimates for \si29 but significantly different than previous work for \ge73. A modest quenching, in accord with shell model studies of other heavy nuclei, has been included to bring agreement between the measured and calculated values of the magnetic moment for \ge73. Even with this quenching, the calculated scattering rate is roughly a factor of 2 higher than the best previous estimates; without quenching, the rate is a factor of 4 higher. This implies a higher sensitivity for germanium dark matter detectors. We also investigate the role of finite momentum transfer upon the scattering response for both nuclei and find that this can significantly change the expected rates. We close with a brief discussion of the effects of some of the non-nuclear uncertainties upon the matrix elements.