• The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500um), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22(+6.2,-5.3)% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR= 1-150 M_sun/yr. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing Ha emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L_TIR > 2x10^11 L_sun), only a small (<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(Ha) to agree with SFR_FIR. The relatively low Ha extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate form normal stellar mass loss.
  • We use deep, five band (100-500um) data from the Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) to fully constrain the obscured star formation rate, SFR_FIR, of galaxies in the Bullet cluster (z=0.296), and a smaller background system (z=0.35) in the same field. Herschel detects 23 Bullet cluster members with a total SFR_FIR = 144 +/- 14 M_sun yr^-1. On average, the background system contains brighter far-infrared (FIR) galaxies, with ~50% higher SFR_FIR (21 galaxies; 207 +/- 9 M_sun yr^-1). SFRs extrapolated from 24um flux via recent templates (SFR_24) agree well with SFR_FIR for ~60% of the cluster galaxies. In the remaining ~40%, SFR_24 underestimates SFR_FIR due to a significant excess in observed S_100/S_24 (rest frame S_75/S_18) compared to templates of the same FIR luminosity.
  • We present results of a gravitational-lensing and optical study of MACS ,J1423.8+2404 (z=0.545, MACS, J1423). Our analysis uses high-resolution images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in the F555W and F814W passbands, ground based imaging in eight optical and near-infrared filters obtained with Subaru and CFHT, as well as extensive spectroscopic data gathered with the Keck telescopes. At optical wavelengths the cluster exhibits no sign of substructure and is dominated by a cD galaxy that is 2.1 magnitudes (K-band) brighter than the second brightest cluster member, suggesting that MACS, J1423 is close to be fully virialized. Analysis of the redshift distribution of 140 cluster members reveals a Gaussian distribution, mildly disturbed by the presence of a loose galaxy group that may be falling into the cluster along the line of sight. Combining strong-lensing constraints from two spectroscopically confirmed multiple-image systems near the cluster core with a weak-lensing measurement of the gravitational shear on larger scales, we derive a parametric mass model for the mass distribution. All constraints can be satisfied by a uni-modal mass distribution centred on the cD galaxy and exhibiting very little substructure. The derived projected mass of M(<65\arcsec [415 kpc])=(4.3\pm0.6)\times 10^{14} M_sun is about 30% higher than the one derived from X-ray analyses assuming spherical symmetry, suggesting a slightly prolate mass distribution consistent with the optical indication of residual line-of-sight structure. The similarity in shape and excellent alignment of the centroids of the total mass, K-band light, and intra-cluster gas distributions add to the picture of a highly evolved system [ABRIDGED]
  • We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 at z = 0.18 using detected strong lensing features from deep HST/ACS observations and extensive ground based spectroscopy. Earlier analyses have reported up to 32 multiply imaged systems in this cluster, of which only 3 were spectroscopically confirmed. In this work, we present a parametric strong lensing mass reconstruction using 24 multiply imaged systems with newly determined spectroscopic redshifts, which is a major step forward in building a robust mass model. In turn, the new spectroscopic data allows a more secure identification of multiply imaged systems. The resultant mass model enables us to reliably predict the redshifts of additional multiply imaged systems for which no spectra are currently available, and to use the location of these systems to further constrain the mass model. In particular, we have detected 5 strong galaxy-galaxy lensing systems just outside the Einstein ring region, further constraining the mass profile. Our strong lensing mass model is consistent with that inferred from our large scale weak lensing analysis derived using CFH12k wide field images. Thanks to a new method for reliably selecting a well defined background lensed galaxy population, we resolve the discrepancy found between the strong and weak lensing mass models reported in earlier work. [ABRIDGED]
  • (abridged) We utilize existing imaging and spectroscopic data for the galaxy clusters MS2137-23 and Abell 383 to present improved measures of the distribution of dark and baryonic material in the clusters' central regions. Our method, based on the combination of gravitational lensing and dynamical data, is uniquely capable of separating the distribution of dark and baryonic components at scales below 100 kpc. We find a variety of strong lensing models fit the available data, including some with dark matter profiles as steep as expected from recent simulations. However, when combined with stellar velocity dispersion data for the brightest member, shallower inner slopes than predicted by numerical simulations are preferred. For Abell 383, the preferred shallow inner slopes are statistically a good fit only when the multiple image position uncertainties associated with our lens model are assumed to be 0\farcs5, to account for unknown substructure. No statistically satisfactory fit was obtained matching both the multiple image lensing data and the velocity dispersion profile of the brightest cluster galaxy in MS2137-23. This suggests that the mass model we are using, which comprises a pseudo-elliptical generalized NFW profile and a brightest cluster galaxy component may inadequately represent the inner cluster regions. This may plausibly arise due to halo triaxiality or by the gravitational interaction of baryons and dark matter in cluster cores. However, the progress made via this detailed study highlights the key role that complementary observations of lensed features and stellar dynamics offer in understanding the interaction between dark and baryonic matter on non-linear scales in the central regions of clusters.
  • Aims: We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. Methods: The eleven clusters in our sample are all X-ray luminous and span a narrow redshift range at z=0.21 +/- 0.04. The weak lensing analysis of the sample is based on ground-based wide-field imaging obtained with the CFH12k camera on CFHT. We use the methodology developed and applied previously on the massive cluster Abell 1689. A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, is used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. With the present data, shear profiles are measured in all clusters out to at least 2 Mpc (more than 15arcmin from the center) with high confidence. The radial shear profiles are fitted with different parametric mass profiles and the virial mass M_200 is estimated for each cluster and then compared to other physical properties. Results: Scaling relations between mass and optical luminosity indicate an increase of the M/L ratio with luminosity and a L_X-M_200 relation scaling as L_X \propto M_200^(0.83 +/- 0.11) while the normalization of the M_200 \propto T_X^{3/2} relation is close to the one expected from hydrodynamical simulations of cluster formation as well as previous X-ray analyses. We suggest that the dispersion in the M_200-T_X and M_200-L_X relations reflects the different merging and dynamical histories for clusters of similar X-ray luminosities and intrinsic variations in their measured masses. Improved statistics of clusters over a wider mass range are required for a better control of the intrinsic scatter in scaling relations.
  • Cosmological N-body simulations predict that dark matter halos should have a universal shape characterized by a steep, cuspy inner profile. Here we report on a spectroscopic study of six clusters each containing a dominant brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) with nearby gravitational arcs. Three clusters have both radial and tangential gravitational arcs, whereas the other three display only tangential arcs. We analyze stellar velocity dispersion data for the BCGs in conjunction with the arc redshifts and lens models to constrain the dark and baryonic mass profiles jointly. For those clusters with radial gravitational arcs we were able to measure precisely the inner slope of the dark matter halo and compare it with that predicted from CDM simulations.
  • Despite extensive observational efforts, the brightest sub--mm source in the Hubble Deep Field, HDF850.1, has failed to yield a convincing optical/infrared identification almost 4 years after its discovery. This failure is all the more notable given the availability of supporting multi-frequency data of unparalleled depth, and sub-arcsec positional accuracy for the sub-mm/mm source. Consequently, HDF850.1 has become a test case of the possibility that the most violently star-forming objects in the universe are too red and/or distant to be seen in the deepest optical images. Here we report the discovery of the host galaxy of HDF850.1. This object has been revealed by careful analysis of a new, deep K-prime image of the HDF obtained with the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. Its reality is confirmed by a similar analysis of the HST NICMOS F160W image of the same region. This object is extremely faint (K=23.5), clumpy (on sub-arcsec scales) and very red (I-K > 5.2; H-K = 1.4 +- 0.35). The likelihood that it is the correct identification is strongly reinforced by a reanalysis of the combined MERLIN+VLA 1.4-GHz map of the field which yields a new radio detection of HDF850.1 only 0.1 arcsec from the new near-ir counterpart, and with sufficient positional accuracy to exclude all previously considered alternative optical candidates. We have calculated new confidence limits on the estimated redshift of HDF850.1 and find z = 4.1 +- 0.5. We also calculate that the flux density of HDF850.1 has been boosted by a factor of ~3 through lensing by the intervening elliptical 3-586.0, consistent with predictions that a small but significant fraction of blank-field sub-mm sources are lensed by foreground galaxies. We discuss the wider implications of these results for the sub-mm population and cosmic star-formation history.
  • We present deep optical and near-infrared imaging of the rich cluster A2218 at z=0.17. Our optical imaging comes from new multicolour Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations in the F450W (B), F606W (V) and F814W (I) passbands. These observations are complemented by deep near-infrared, Ks-band, imaging from the new INGRID imager on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. This combination provides unique high-precision multicolour optical-infrared photometry and morphological information for a large sample of galaxies in the core of this rich cluster at a lookback time of ~3Gyrs. We analyse the (B-I), (V-I) and (I-Ks) colours of galaxies spanning a range of a factor of 100 in K-band luminosity in this region and compare these with grids of stellar population models. We find that the locus of the colours of the stellar populations in the luminous (>0.5L*) early-type galaxies, both ellipticals and S0s, traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a single age. At fainter luminosities (<0.1L*), this sequence is extended to lower metallicities by the morphologically-classified ellipticals. However, the faintest S0s exhibit very different behaviour, showing a wide range in colours, including a large fraction (30%) with relatively blue colours which appear to have younger luminosity-weighted ages for their stellar populations, 2-5Gyrs. We show that the proportion of these young S0s in the cluster population is consistent with the observed decrease in the S0 population seen in distant clusters when interpreted within the framework of a two-step spectroscopic and morphological transformation of accreted spiral field galaxies into cluster S0s.