• We analyze the BOOMERanG 2003 (B03) 145 GHz temperature map to constrain the amplitude of a non Gaussian, primordial contribution to CMB fluctuations. We perform a pixel space analysis restricted to a portion of the map chosen in view of high sensitivity, very low foreground contamination and tight control of systematic effects. We set up an estimator based on the three Minkowski functionals which relies on high quality simulated data, including non Gaussian CMB maps. We find good agreement with the Gaussian hypothesis and derive the first limits based on BOOMERanG data for the non linear coupling parameter f_NL as -300<f_NL<650 at 68% CL and -800<f_NL<1050 at 95% CL.
  • We discuss the derivation of the analytic properties of the cross-power spectrum estimator from multi-detector CMB anisotropy maps. The method is computationally convenient and it provides unbiased estimates under very broad assumptions. We also propose a new procedure for testing for the presence of residual bias due to inappropriate noise subtraction in pseudo-$C_{\ell}$ estimates. We derive the analytic behavior of this procedure under the null hypothesis, and use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate its efficiency properties, which appear very promising. For instance, for full sky maps with isotropic white noise, the test is able to identify an error of 1% on the noise amplitude estimate.
  • The ellipticity of the anisotropy spots of the Cosmic Microwave Background measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has been studied. We find an average ellipticity of about 2, confirming with a far larger statistics similar results found first for the COBE-DMR CMB maps, and then for the BOOMERanG CMB maps. There are no preferred directions for the obliquity of the anisotropy spots. The average ellipticity is independent of temperature threshold and is present on scales both smaller and larger than the horizon at the last scattering. The measured ellipticity characteristics are consistent with being the effect of geodesics mixing occurring in an hyperbolic Universe, and can mark the emergence of CMB ellipticity as a new observable constant describing the Universe. There is no way of simulating this effect. Therefore we cannot exclude that the observed behavior of the measured ellipticity can result from a trivial topology in the popular flat $\Lambda$-CDM model, or from a non-trivial topology.
  • The recent study of BOOMERanG 150 GHz Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation maps have detected ellipticity of the temperature anisotropy spots independent on the temperature threshold. The effect has been found for spots up to several degrees in size, where the biases of the ellipticity estimator and of the noise are small. To check the effect, now we have studied, with the same algorithm and in the same sky region, the WMAP maps. We find ellipticity of the same average value also in WMAP maps, despite of the different sensitivity of the two experiments to low multipoles. Large spot elongations had been detected also for the COBE-DMR maps. If this effect is due to geodesic mixing and hence due to non precisely zero curvature of the hyperbolic Universe, it can be linked to the origin of WMAP low multipoles anomaly.
  • We have measured the ellipticity of several degree scale anisotropies in the BOOMERanG maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at 150 GHz. The average ellipticity is around 2.6-2.7. The biases of the estimator of the ellipticity and for the noise are small in this case. Large spot elongation had been detected also for COBE-DMR maps. If this effect is due to geodesic mixing, it would indicate a non precisely zero curvature of the Universe which is among the discussed reasons of the WMAP low multipole anomaly. Both effects are related to the diameter of the Universe: the geodesics mixing through hyperbolic geometry, low multipoles through boundary conditions.This common reason can also be related with the origin of the the cosmological constant: the modes of vacuum fluctuations conditioned by the boundary conditions lead to a value of the cosmological constant being in remarkable agreement with the supernovae observations.