• We present new measurements of the free-streaming of warm dark matter (WDM) from Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectra. We use data from the medium resolution, intermediate redshift XQ-100 sample observed with the X-shooter spectrograph ($z=3 - 4.2$) and the high-resolution, high-redshift sample used in Viel et al. (2013) obtained with the HIRES/MIKE spectrographs ($z=4.2 - 5.4$). Based on further improved modelling of the dependence of the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectrum on the free-streaming of dark matter, cosmological parameters, as well as the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) with hydrodynamical simulations, we obtain the following limits, expressed as the equivalent mass of thermal relic WDM particles. The XQ-100 flux power spectrum alone gives a lower limit of 1.4 keV, the re-analysis of the HIRES/MIKE sample gives 4.1 keV while the combined analysis gives our best and significantly strengthened lower limit of 5.3 keV (all 2$\sigma$ C.L.). The further improvement in the joint analysis is partly due to the fact that the two data sets have different degeneracies between astrophysical and cosmological parameters that are broken when the data sets are combined, and more importantly on chosen priors on the thermal evolution. These results all assume that the temperature evolution of the IGM can be modelled as a power law in redshift. Allowing for a non-smooth evolution of the temperature of the IGM with sudden temperature changes of up to 5000K reduces the lower limit for the combined analysis to 3.5 keV. A WDM with smaller thermal relic masses would require, however, a sudden temperature jump of $5000\,K$ or more in the narrow redshift interval $z=4.6-4.8$, in disagreement with observations of the thermal history based on high-resolution resolution Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data and expectations for photo-heating and cooling in the low density IGM at these redshifts.
  • The HeII transverse proximity effect - enhanced HeII Ly{\alpha} transmission in a background sightline caused by the ionizing radiation of a foreground quasar - offers a unique opportunity to probe the emission properties of quasars, in particular the emission geometry (obscuration, beaming) and the quasar lifetime. Building on the foreground quasar survey published in Schmidt+2017, we present a detailed model of the HeII transverse proximity effect, specifically designed to include light travel time effects, finite quasar ages, and quasar obscuration. We post-process outputs from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a fluctuating HeII UV background model, plus the added effect of the radiation from a single bright foreground quasar. We vary the age $t_\mathrm{age}$ and obscured sky fractions $\Omega_\mathrm{obsc}$ of the foreground quasar, and explore the resulting effect on the HeII transverse proximity effect signal. Fluctuations in IGM density and the UV background, as well as the unknown orientation of the foreground quasar, result in a large variance of the HeII Ly{\alpha} transmission along the background sightline. We develop a fully Bayesian statistical formalism to compare far UV HeII Ly{\alpha} transmission spectra of the background quasars to our models, and extract joint constraints on $t_\mathrm{age}$ and $\Omega_\mathrm{obsc}$ for the six Schmidt+2017 foreground quasars with the highest implied HeII photoionization rates. Our analysis suggests a bimodal distribution of quasar emission properties, whereby one foreground quasar, associated with a strong HeII transmission spike, is relatively old $(22\,\mathrm{Myr})$ and unobscured $\Omega_\mathrm{obsc}<35\%$, whereas three others are either younger than $(10\,\mathrm{Myr})$ or highly obscured $(\Omega_\mathrm{obsc}>70\%)$.
  • We analyze new far-ultraviolet spectra of 13 quasars from the z~0.2 COS-Halos survey that cover the HI Lyman limit of 14 circumgalactic medium (CGM) systems. These data yield precise estimates or more constraining limits than previous COS-Halos measurements on the HI column densities NHI. We then apply a Monte-Carlo Markov Chain approach on 32 systems from COS-Halos to estimate the metallicity of the cool (T~10^4K) CGM gas that gives rise to low-ionization state metal lines, under the assumption of photoionization equilibrium with the extragalactic UV background. The principle results are: (1) the CGM of field L* galaxies exhibits a declining HI surface density with impact parameter Rperp (at >99.5%$ confidence), (2) the transmission of ionizing radiation through CGM gas alone is 70+/-7%; (3) the metallicity distribution function of the cool CGM is unimodal with a median of 1/3 Z_Sun and a 95% interval from ~1/50 Z_Sun to over 3x solar. The incidence of metal poor (<1/100 Z_Sun) gas is low, implying any such gas discovered along quasar sightlines is typically unrelated to L* galaxies; (4) we find an unexpected increase in gas metallicity with declining NHI (at >99.9% confidence) and, therefore, also with increasing Rperp. The high metallicity at large radii implies early enrichment; (5) A non-parametric estimate of the cool CGM gas mass is M_CGM_cool = 9.2 +/- 4.3 10^10 Msun, which together with new mass estimates for the hot CGM may resolve the galactic missing baryons problem. Future analyses of halo gas should focus on the underlying astrophysics governing the CGM, rather than processes that simply expel the medium from the halo.
  • We present the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power spectrum measurements of the XQ-100 sample of quasar spectra obtained in the context of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "Quasars and their absorption lines: a legacy survey of the high redshift universe with VLT/XSHOOTER". Using $100$ quasar spectra with medium resolution and signal-to-noise ratio we measure the power spectrum over a range of redshifts $z = 3 - 4.2$ and over a range of scales $k = 0.003 - 0.06\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$. The results agree well with the measurements of the one-dimensional power spectrum found in the literature. The data analysis used in this paper is based on the Fourier transform and has been tested on synthetic data. Systematic and statistical uncertainties of our measurements are estimated, with a total error (statistical and systematic) comparable to the one of the BOSS data in the overlapping range of scales, and smaller by more than $50\%$ for higher redshift bins ($z>3.6$) and small scales ($k > 0.01\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$). The XQ-100 data set has the unique feature of having signal-to-noise ratios and resolution intermediate between the two data sets that are typically used to perform cosmological studies, i.e. BOSS and high-resolution spectra (e.g. UVES/VLT or HIRES). More importantly, the measured flux power spectra span the high redshift regime which is usually more constraining for structure formation models.
  • A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by its lifetime. The model is then applied to the distribution of high equivalent width Lyman $\alpha$ emitters (with rest-frame equivalent widths above 100 A, threshold used in e.g. Trainor & Steidel, 2013) identified in a deep narrow-band 36x36 arcmin$^2$ image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420-388. These emitters are found to the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, the two most distant objects require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60 degrees or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum 30 degrees. However, few of the other expected signatures of boosted fluorescence are seen at the current survey limits, e.g. a fall off in Lyman $\alpha$ brightness, or equivalent width, with distance. Furthermore, to have most of the Lyman $\alpha$ emission of the two distant sources to be fluorescently boosted would require the quasar to have been significantly brighter in the past. This suggests that these particular sources may not be fluorescent, invalidating the above lifetime constraints. This would cast doubt on the use of this relatively low equivalent width threshold and thus on the lifetime analysis in Trainor & Steidel (2013).
  • We measure the effective optical depth of HeII Ly\alpha\ absorption \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$ at 2.3<z<3.5 in 17 UV-transmitting quasars observed with UV spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The median \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$ values increase gradually from 1.95 at z=2.7 to 5.17 at z=3.4, but with a strong sightline-to-sightline variance. Many $\simeq$35 comoving Mpc regions of the z>3 intergalactic medium (IGM) remain transmissive (\tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$<4), and the gradual trend with redshift appears consistent with density evolution of a fully reionized IGM. These modest optical depths imply average HeII fractions of x$_\mathsf{HeII}$<0.01 and HeII ionizing photon mean free paths of $\simeq$50 comoving Mpc at z$\simeq$3.4, thus requiring that a substantial volume of the helium in the Universe was already doubly ionized at early times; this stands in conflict with current models of HeII reionization driven by luminous quasars. Along 10 sightlines we measure the coeval HI Ly\alpha\ effective optical depths, allowing us to study the density dependence of \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$ at z$\sim$3. We establish that the dependence of \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$ on increasing \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HI}$ is significantly shallower than expected from simple models of an IGM reionized in HeII. This requires higher HeII photoionization rates in overdense regions or underdense regions being not in photoionization equilibrium. Moreover, there are very large fluctuations in \tau$_\mathsf{eff,HeII}$ at all $\tau_\mathsf{eff,HI}$, which greatly exceed the expectations from these simple models. These data present a distinct challenge to scenarios of HeII reionization - an IGM where HeII appears to be predominantly ionized at z$\simeq$3.4, and with a radiation field strength that may be correlated with the density field, but exhibits large fluctuations at all densities.
  • We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyze the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < z$\rm_{em}$ < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/VLT in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect a $\sim$ 8 $\sigma$ excess in the number density of absorbers within 10,000 km/s of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km/s cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10,000 km/s when also weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 \AA) are considered. We infer NV is the ion that better traces the effects of the quasar ionization field, offering the best statistical tool to identify intrinsic systems. Following this criterion we estimate that the fraction of quasars in our sample hosting an intrinsic NAL system is 33 percent. Lastly, we compare the properties of the material along the quasar line of sight, derived from our sample, with results based on close quasar pairs investigating the transverse direction. We find a deficiency of cool gas (traced by CII) along the line of sight associated with the quasar host galaxy, in contrast with what is observed in the transverse direction.
  • We present the largest homogeneous survey of $z>4.4$ damped Lyman-$\alpha$ systems (DLAs) using the spectra of 163 QSOs that comprise the Giant Gemini GMOS (GGG) survey. With this survey we make the most precise high-redshift measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral hydrogen, $\Omega_{\rm HI}$. At such high redshift important systematic uncertainties in the identification of DLAs are produced by strong intergalactic medium absorption and QSO continuum placement. These can cause spurious DLA detections, result in real DLAs being missed, or bias the inferred DLA column density distribution. We correct for these effects using a combination of mock and higher-resolution spectra, and show that for the GGG DLA sample the uncertainties introduced are smaller than the statistical errors on $\Omega_{\rm HI}$. We find $\Omega_{\rm HI}=0.98^{+0.20}_{-0.18}\times10^{-3}$ at $\langle z\rangle=4.9$, assuming a 20% contribution from lower column density systems below the DLA threshold. By comparing to literature measurements at lower redshifts, we show that $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ can be described by the functional form $\Omega_{\rm HI}(z)\propto(1+z)^{0.4}$. This gradual decrease from $z=5$ to $0$ is consistent with the bulk of HI gas being a transitory phase fuelling star formation, which is continually replenished by more highly-ionized gas from the intergalactic medium, and from recycled galactic winds.
  • KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • Previous studies of the 2.2 < z< 2.7 HeII Lyman-alpha forest measured much larger ionizing background fluctuations than are anticipated theoretically. We re-analyze recent Hubble Space Telescope data from the two HeII sightlines that have been used to make these measurements, HE2347-4342 and HS1700+6416, and find that the vast majority of the absorption is actually consistent with a single HeII photoionization rate. We show that the data constrains the RMS fractional fluctuation level smoothed at 1 Mpc to be < 2 and discuss why other studies had found larger fluctuations. Our measurement is consistent with models in which quasars dominate the z=2.5 metagalactic HeII-ionizing background (but it can accommodate less compelling models), and it suggests that quasars (rather than stars) are the dominant contributor to the HI-ionizing background. We detect a HeII transverse proximity effect that is slightly offset in redshift from a known quasar. Its profile and offset may indicate that the quasar turned on 10 Myr ago.
  • We have obtained spectra of 163 quasars at $z_\mathrm{em}>4.4$ with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrometers on the Gemini North and South telescopes, the largest publicly available sample of high-quality, low-resolution spectra at these redshifts. From this homogeneous data set, we generated stacked quasar spectra in three redshift intervals at $z\sim 5$. We have modelled the flux below the rest-frame Lyman limit ($\lambda_\mathrm{r}<912$\AA) to assess the mean free path $\lambda_\mathrm{mfp}^{912}$ of the intergalactic medium to HI-ionizing radiation. At mean redshifts $z_\mathrm{q}=4.56$, 4.86 and 5.16, we measure $\lambda_\mathrm{mfp}^{912}=(22.2\pm 2.3, 15.1\pm 1.8, 10.3\pm 1.6)h_{70}^{-1}$ proper Mpc with uncertainties dominated by sample variance. Combining our results with $\lambda_\mathrm{mfp}^{912}$ measurements from lower redshifts, the data are well modelled by a simple power-law $\lambda_\mathrm{mfp}^{912}=A[(1+z)/5]^\eta$ with $A=(37\pm 2)h_{70}^{-1}$ Mpc and $\eta = -5.4\pm 0.4$ between $z=2.3$ and $z=5.5$. This rapid evolution requires a physical mechanism -- beyond cosmological expansion -- which reduces the cosmic effective Lyman limit opacity. We speculate that the majority of HI Lyman limit opacity manifests in gas outside galactic dark matter haloes, tracing large-scale structures (e.g. filaments) whose average density (and consequently neutral fraction) decreases with cosmic time. Our measurements of the strongly redshift-dependent mean free path shortly after the completion of HI reionization serve as a valuable boundary condition for numerical models thereof. Having measured $\lambda_\mathrm{mfp}^{912}\approx 10$ Mpc at $z=5.2$, we confirm that the intergalactic medium is highly ionized by that epoch and that the redshift evolution of the mean free path does not show a break that would indicate a recent end to HI reionization.
  • We present results of a blind survey of Lyman limit systems (LLSs) detected in absorption against 105 quasars at z~3 using the blue sensitive MagE spectrograph at the Magellan Clay telescope. By searching for Lyman limit absorption in the wavelength range ~3000-4000A, we measure the number of LLSs per unit redshift l(z)=1.21+/-0.28 at z~2.8. Using a stacking analysis, we further estimate the mean free path of ionizing photons in the z~3 Universe lambda^912 = 100+/-29 Mpc/h_70.4. Combined with our LLS survey, we conclude that systems with log N_HI >= 17.5 cm^-2 contribute only ~40% to the observed mean free path at these redshifts. Further, with the aid of photo-ionization modeling, we infer that a population of ionized and metal poor systems is likely required to reproduce the metal line strengths observed in a composite spectrum of 20 LLSs with N_HI = 17.5-19 cm^-2 at z~2.6-3.0. Finally, with a simple toy model, we deduce that gas in the halos of galaxies can alone account for the totality of LLSs at z<~3, but a progressively higher contribution from the intergalactic medium is required beyond z~3.5. We also show how the weakly evolving number of LLSs per unit redshift at z<~3 can be modeled either by requiring that the spatial extent of the circumgalactic medium is redshift invariant in the last ~10 Gyr of cosmic evolution or by postulating that LLSs arise in halos that are rare fluctuations in the density field at each redshift.
  • We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope Survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(x) respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z< 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(x)=0.29 +/-0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. (2011). Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z=2.4 of lambda_mfp = 243(252)h^(-1) Mpc, with an error on the mean value of +/- 43h^(-1) Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of lambda_mfp from Prochaska et al. (2009) and place constraints on the evolution of lambda_mfp with redshift, including an estimate of the "breakthrough" redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N_HI <= 10^{17.5} cm^(-2) with a value for the total Lyman opacity of tau_lyman = 0.40 +/- 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power-law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N_HI, X) at z \sim 2.4, find that f(N_HI,X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z \sim 2.4 and z \sim 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N_HI,X).
  • On 2012 May 17.2 UT, only 1.5 +/- 0.2 d after explosion, we discovered SN 2012cg, a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 4424 (d ~ 15 Mpc). As a result of the newly modified strategy employed by the Lick Observatory SN Search, a sequence of filtered images was obtained starting 161 s after discovery. Utilizing recent models describing the interaction of SN ejecta with a companion star, we rule out a ~1 M_Sun companion for half of all viewing angles and a red-giant companion for nearly all orientations. SN 2012cg reached a B-band maximum of 12.09 +/- 0.02 mag on 2012 June 2.0 and took ~17.3 d from explosion to reach this, typical for SNe Ia. Our pre-maximum brightness photometry shows a narrower-than-average B-band light curve for SN 2012cg, though slightly overluminous at maximum brightness and with normal color evolution (including some of the earliest SN Ia filtered photometry ever obtained). Spectral fits to SN 2012cg reveal ions typically found in SNe Ia at early times, with expansion velocities >14,000 km/s at 2.5 d past explosion. Absorption from C II is detected early, as well as high-velocity components of both Si II 6355 Ang. and Ca II. Our last spectrum (13.5 d past explosion) resembles that of the somewhat peculiar SN Ia 1999aa. This suggests that SN 2012cg will have a slower-than-average declining light curve, which may be surprising given the faster-than-average rising light curve.
  • The HI 21cm absorption optical depth and the N(HI) derived from Lya absorption can be combined to yield the spin temperature (Ts) of DLAs. Although Ts measurements exist for samples of DLAs with z <0.6 and z >1.7, the intermediate redshift regime currently contains only 2 HI 21cm detections, leading to a `redshift desert' that spans 4 Gyrs of cosmic time. To connect the low and high z regimes, we present observations of the Lya line of six 0.6<z<1.7 HI 21cm absorbers. The dataset is complemented by both VLBA observations (to derive the absorber covering factor, f), and optical echelle spectra from which metal abundances are determined. Our dataset therefore not only offers the largest statistical study of HI 21cm absorbers to date, and bridges the redshift desert, but is also the first to use a fully f-corrected dataset to look for metallicity-based trends. In agreement with trends found in Galactic sightlines, we find that the lowest N(HI) absorbers tend to be dominated by warm gas. In the DLA regime, spin temperatures show a wider range of values than Galactic data, as may be expected in a heterogenous galactic population. However, we find that low metallicity DLAs are dominated by small cold gas fractions and only absorbers with relatively high metallicities exhibit significant fractions of cold gas. Using a compilation of HI 21cm absorbers which are selected to have f-corrected spin temperatures, we confirm an anti-correlation between metallicity and Ts at 3.4 sigma significance. Finally, one of the DLAs in our sample is a newly-discovered HI 21cm absorber (at z=0.602 towards J1431+3952), which we find to have the lowest f-corrected spin temperature yet reported in the literature: Ts=90+-23 K. The observed distribution of Ts and metallicities in DLAs and the implications for understanding the characteristics of the interstellar medium in high redshift galaxies are discussed.
  • We report on the detection of strongly varying intergalactic HeII absorption in HST/COS spectra of two z~3 quasars. From our homogeneous analysis of the HeII absorption in these and three archival sightlines, we find a marked increase in the mean HeII effective optical depth from tau~1 at z~2.3 to tau>5 at z~3.2, but with a large scatter of 2< tau <5 at 2.7< z <3 on scales of ~10 proper Mpc. This scatter is primarily due to fluctuations in the HeII fraction and the HeII-ionizing background, rather than density variations that are probed by the co-eval HI forest. Semianalytic models of HeII absorption require a strong decrease in the HeII-ionizing background to explain the strong increase of the absorption at z>2.7, probably indicating HeII reionization was incomplete at z>2.7. Likewise, recent three-dimensional numerical simulations of HeII reionization qualitatively agree with the observed trend only if HeII reionization completes at z=2.7 or even below, as suggested by a large tau>3 in two of our five sightlines at z<2.8. By doubling the sample size at 2.7< z <3, our newly discovered HeII sightlines for the first time probe the diversity of the second epoch of reionization when helium became fully ionized.
  • We study the small population of z>2.7 quasars detected by GALEX, whose far-UV emission is not extinguished by intervening HI Lyman limit systems. These quasars are of particular importance to detect intergalactic HeII absorption along their sightlines. We correlate verified z>2.7 quasars to the GALEX GR4 source catalog, yielding 304 S/N>3 sources. However, ~50% of these are only detected in the GALEX NUV band, signaling the truncation of the FUV flux by low-redshift Lyman limit systems. We exploit the GALEX UV color to cull the most promising targets for follow-up studies, with blue (red) GALEX colors indicating transparent (opaque) sightlines. Monte Carlo simulations indicate a HeII detection rate of ~60% for quasars with FUV-NUV<1 at z<3.5, a ~50% increase over GALEX searches that do not include color information. We regard 52 quasars detected at S/N>3 to be most promising for HST follow-up, with an additional 114 quasars if we consider S/N>2 detections in the FUV. SDSS provides just half of the NUV-bright quasars that should have been detected by SDSS & GALEX. We revise the SDSS quasar selection function, finding that SDSS systematically misses quasars with blue u-g<2 colors at 3<z<3.5 due to overlap with the stellar locus in color space. Our color-dependent SDSS selection function naturally explains the inhomogeneous u-g color distribution of SDSS quasars with redshift and the color difference between color-selected and radio-selected SDSS quasars. Moreover, it yields excellent agreement between the observed and the predicted number of UV-bright SDSS quasars. We confirm our previous claims that SDSS preferentially selects 3<z<3.5 quasars with intervening HI Lyman limit systems. Our results imply that broadband optical color surveys for 3<z<3.5 quasars have likely underestimated their space density by selecting IGM sightlines with an excess of strong HI absorbers.
  • (Abridged) We present the results from the largest investigation to date of the proximity effect in the HI Lyalpha forest, using the fifth SDSS data release. The sample consists of 1733 QSOs at redshifts z>2.3 and S/N>10. We adopted the flux statistic to infer the evolution of the HI effective optical depth in the Lyalpha forest between 2<z<4.5, finding very good agreement with results from high-resolution QSO samples. We compared the average opacity close to the quasar emission with its expected behavior in the Lyalpha forest and estimated the signature of the proximity effect towards individual objects at high significance in about 98% of the QSOs. Dividing the whole sample of objects in eight subsets according to their emission redshift, we inferred the proximity effect strength distribution (PESD) on each of them finding in all cases a prominent peak and an extending tail towards values associated to a weak effect. We provide for the first time observational evidence for an evolution in the asymmetry of the PESD with redshift. Adopting the modal values of the PESDs as our best and unbiased estimates of the UV background photoionization rate (Gamma_HI), we determine its evolution within the range 2.3<z<4.6. Our measurements do not show any significant decline towards high redshift and are located at Log(Gamma_HI)=-11.78\pm0.07 in units of s^-1. We decompose the observed photoionization rate into two major contributors: quasar and star-forming galaxies. By modeling the quasar contribution with different luminosity functions we estimated their contribution to Gamma_HI, thus putting a constraint on the residuals. We conclude that independently of the assumed luminosity function, stars are dominating the UVB at z>3.
  • We used 40 high resolution, high S/N QSO spectra at 2.1<z<4.7 to search for the signature of the proximity effect in the HI Lyalpha forest. Comparing the effective optical depth near each QSO with the expected one, we clearly detect the proximity effect on the combined QSO sample and towards each individual QSO. The observed proximity effect strength distribution (PESD) is asymmetric towards a weak effect. We demonstrate that this is not simply an effect of gravitational clustering around QSOs. Comparing simulated PESDs with observations, we argue that the averaging method to determine the UVB intensity J is heavily biased towards high values because of the PESD asymmetry. Using instead the mode of the PESD provides an unbiased estimate of J. For our sample its modal value is log(J)=-21.51+/-0.15 (in units of ergcm^-2s^-1Hz^-1sr^-1) at z=2.73. We estimated the excess HI absorption attributed to gravitational clustering. On scales of ~3 Mpc, only a minority of QSOs shows overdensities of up to a factor of a few in tau_eff; these are exactly the objects with the weakest proximity effects. After removing them, we redetermined the UVB intensity arriving at log(J)=-21.46+0.14-0.21. This is the most accurate measurement of J to date. We present a new diagnostic based on the shape of the PESD which strongly supports our conclusion that there is no systematic overdensity bias for the proximity effect. This additional diagnostic breaks the otherwise unavoidable degeneracy of the proximity effect between UVB and overdensity. We estimated the redshift evolution of J and found tentative evidence for a mild decrease with increasing redshift. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for the evolving UVB intensity, supporting the notion of a substantial contribution of star-forming galaxies.