• For one decade, the spectral-type and age of the $\rho$ Oph object IRS-48 were subject to debates and mysteries. Modelling its disk with mid-infrared to millimeter observations led to various explanations to account for the complex intricacy of dust-holes and gas-depleted regions. We present multi-epoch high-angular-resolution interferometric near-infrared data of spatially-resolved emissions in its first 15AU, known to have very strong Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions within this dust-depleted region. We make use of new Sparse-Aperture-Masking data to instruct a revised radiative-transfer model where SED fluxes and interferometry are jointly fitted. Neutral and ionized PAH, Very Small Grains (VSG) and classical silicates are incorporated into the model; new stellar parameters and extinction laws are explored. A bright (42L$_{\odot}$) central-star with A$_v$=12.5mag and R$_v$=6.5 requires less near-infrared excess: the inner-most disk at $\approx$1AU is incompatible with the data. The revised stellar parameters place this system on a 4 Myr evolutionary track, 4 times younger than previous estimations, in better agreement with the surrounding $\rho$ Oph region and disk-lifetimes observations. The disk-structure converges to a classical-grains outer-disk from 55AU combined with a fully resolved VSG\&PAH-ring, at 11-26 AU. We find two over-luminosities in the PAH-ring at color-temperatures consistent with the radiative transfer simulations; one follows a Keplerian circular orbit at 14AU. We show a depletion of a factor $\approx$5 of classical dust grains compared to VSG\&PAH: the IRS-48 disk is nearly void of dust-grains in the first 55 AU. A 3.5M$_{Jup}$ planet on a 40AU orbit qualitatively explains the new disk-structure.
  • OTS44 is one of only four free-floating planets known to have a disk. We have previously shown that it is the coolest and least massive known free-floating planet ($\sim$12 M$_{\rm Jup}$) with a substantial disk that is actively accreting. We have obtained Band 6 (233 GHz) ALMA continuum data of this very young disk-bearing object. The data shows a clear unresolved detection of the source. We obtained disk-mass estimates via empirical correlations derived for young, higher-mass, central (substellar) objects. The range of values obtained are between 0.07 and 0.63 M$_{\oplus}$ (dust masses). We compare the properties of this unique disk with those recently reported around higher-mass (brown dwarfs) young objects in order to infer constraints on its mechanism of formation. While extreme assumptions on dust temperature yield disk-mass values that could slightly diverge from the general trends found for more massive brown dwarfs, a range of sensible values provide disk masses compatible with a unique scaling relation between $M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{*}$ through the substellar domain down to planetary masses.
  • Thanks to the detections of more than 3000 exoplanets these last 20 years, statistical studies have already highlighted some properties in the distribution of the planet parameters. Nevertheless, few studies have yet investigated the planet populations from short to large separations around the same star since this requires the use of different detection techniques that usually target different types of stars. We wish to develop a tool that combines direct and indirect methods so as to correctly investigate the giant planet populations at all separations. We developed the MESS2 code, a Monte Carlo simulation code combining radial velocity and direct imaging data obtained at different epochs for a given star to estimate the detection probability of giant planets spanning a wide range of physical separations. It is based on the generation of synthetic planet populations. We apply MESS2 on a young M1-type, the nearby star AUMic observed with HARPS and NACO/ESO. We show that giant planet detection limits are significantly improved at intermediate separations (~20au in the case of AUMic). We show that the traditional approach of analysing independently the RV and DI detection limits systematically overestimates the planet detection limits and hence planet occurrence rates. The use of MESS2 allows to obtain correct planet occurrence rates in statistical studies, making use of multi-epoch DI data and/or RV measurements. We also show that MESS2 can optimise the schedule of future DI observations.
  • HR4796A is surrounded by a debris disc, observed in scattered light as an inclined ring. Past observations raised several questions. First, a strong brightness asymmetry detected in polarized reflected light recently challenged our understanding of scattering by the dust particles in this system. Secondly, the morphology of the ring strongly suggests the presence of planets, although no planets have been detected to date. We obtained high-angular resolution coronagraphic images of the circumstellar environment around HR4796A with VLT/SPHERE during the commissioning of the instrument in May 2014 and during guaranteed-time observations in February 2015. The observations reveal for the first time the entire ring of dust, including the semi-minor axis that was previously hidden either behind the coronagraphic spot or in the speckle noise. We determine empirically the scattering phase function of the dust in the H band from 13.6deg to 166.6deg. It shows a prominent peak of forward scattering, never detected before, for scattering angles below 30deg. We analyse the reflectance spectra of the disc from the 0.95 to 1.6 microns, confirming the red colour of the dust, and derive detection limits on the presence of planetary mass objects. We confirm which side of the disc is inclined towards the Earth. The analysis of the phase function suggests that the dust population is dominated by particles much larger than the observation wavelength, of about 20 microns. Compact Mie grains of this size are incompatible with the spectral energy distribution of the disc, however the observed rise in scattering efficiency beyond 50deg points towards aggregates which could reconcile both observables. We do not detect companions orbiting the star but our high-contrast observations provide the most stringent constraints yet on the presence of planets responsible for the morphology of the dust.
  • We present the current results of the astrometric characterization of the VLT planet finder SPHERE over 2 years of on-sky operations. We first describe the criteria for the selection of the astrometric fields used for calibrating the science data: binaries, multiple systems, and stellar clusters. The analysis includes measurements of the pixel scale and the position angle with respect to the North for both near-infrared subsystems, the camera IRDIS and the integral field spectrometer IFS, as well as the distortion for the IRDIS camera. The IRDIS distortion is shown to be dominated by an anamorphism of 0.60+/-0.02% between the horizontal and vertical directions of the detector, i.e. 6 mas at 1". The anamorphism is produced by the cylindrical mirrors in the common path structure hence common to all three SPHERE science subsystems (IRDIS, IFS, and ZIMPOL), except for the relative orientation of their field of view. The current estimates of the pixel scale and North angle for IRDIS are 12.255+/-0.009 milliarcseconds/pixel for H2 coronagraphic images and -1.75+/-0.08 deg. Analyses of the IFS data indicate a pixel scale of 7.46+/-0.02 milliarcseconds/pixel and a North angle of -102.18+/-0.13 deg. We finally discuss plans for providing astrometric calibration to the SPHERE users outside the instrument consortium.
  • A large number of direct imaging surveys for exoplanets have been performed in recent years, yielding the first directly imaged planets and providing constraints on the prevalence and distribution of wide planetary systems. However, like most of the radial velocity ones, these surveys generally focus on single stars, hence binaries and higher-order multiples have not been studied to the same level of scrutiny. This motivated the SPOTS (Search for Planets Orbiting Two Stars) survey, which is an ongoing direct imaging study of a large sample of close binaries, started with VLT/NACO and now continuing with VLT/SPHERE. To complement this survey, we have identified the close binary targets in 24 published direct imaging surveys. Here we present our statistical analysis of this combined body of data. We analysed a sample of 117 tight binary systems, using a combined Monte Carlo and Bayesian approach to derive the expected values of the frequency of companions, for different values of the companion's semi-major axis. Our analysis suggest that the frequency of sub-stellar companions in wide orbit is moderately low ($\lesssim $13% with a best value of 6% at 95% confidence level) and not significantly different between single stars and tight binaries. One implication of this result is that the very high frequency of circumbinary planets in wide orbits around post-common envelope binaries, implied by eclipse timing (up to 90% according to Zorotovic & Schreiber 2013), can not be uniquely due to planets formed before the common-envelope phase (first generation planets), supporting instead the second generation planet formation or a non-Keplerian origin of the timing variations.
  • We image with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity disk features that could be potential signs of planet-disk interaction. Two companion candidates have been claimed in the disk around the young Herbig Ae/Be star HD100546. Thus, this object serves as an excellent target for our investigation of the natal environment of giant planets. We exploit the power of extreme adaptive optics operating in conjunction with the new high-contrast imager SPHERE to image HD100546 in scattered light. We obtain the first polarized light observations of this source in the visible (with resolution as fine as 2 AU) and new H and K band total intensity images that we analyze with the Pynpoint package. The disk shows a complex azimuthal morphology, where multiple scattering of photons most likely plays an important role. High brightness contrasts and arm-like structures are ubiquitous in the disk. A double-wing structure (partly due to ADI processing) resembles a morphology newly observed in inclined disks. Given the cavity size in the visible (11 AU), the CO emission associated to the planet candidate 'c' might arise from within the circumstellar disk. We find an extended emission in the K band at the expected location of 'b'. The surrounding large-scale region is the brightest in scattered light. There is no sign of any disk gap associated to 'b'.
  • Imaging companions to main-sequence stars often allows to detect a projected orbital motion. MCMC has become very popular in for fitting their orbits. Some of these companions appear to move on very eccentric, possibly unbound orbits. This is the case for the exoplanet Fomalhaut b and the brown dwarf companion PZ Tel B. For such orbits, standard MCMC codes assuming only bound orbits may be inappropriate. We develop a new MCMC implementation able to handle bound and unbound orbits as well in a continuous manner, and we apply it to the cases of Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. This code is based on universal Keplerian variables and Stumpff functions formalism. We present two versions of this code, the second one using a different set of angular variables designed to avoid degeneracies arising when the projected orbital motion is quasi-radial, as it is the case for PZ Tel B. We also present additional observations of PZ Tel B. The code is applied to Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. Concerning Fomalhaut b, we confirm previous results, but we show that open orbital solutions are also possible. The eccentricity distribution nevertheless peaks around ~0.9 in the bound regime. We present a first successful orbital fit of PZ Tel B, showing in particular that the eccentricity distribution presents a sharp peak very close to e=1, meaning a quasi-parabolic orbit. It was recently suggested that unseen inner companions may lead orbital fitting algorithms to artificially give high eccentricities. We show that this caveat is unlikely to apply to Fomalhaut b. Concerning PZ Tel B, an inner ~12 MJup companion would mimic a e=1 orbit despite a real eccentricity around 0.7, but a dynamical analysis reveals that such a system would not be stable. We conclude that our orbital fit is robust.
  • We present the first optical (590--890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirm the highly eccentric scattered-light gap shape that was postulated from near-infrared imaging, at odds with the symmetric gap inferred from millimeter interferometry. Furthermore, we resolve the inner disk for the first time and trace it out to 30 AU. This new source of scattered light may contribute to the near-infrared interferometric signal attributed to the protoplanet candidate LkCa 15 b, which lies embedded in the outer regions of the inner disk. Finally, we present a new model for the system architecture of LkCa 15 that ties these new findings together. These observations were taken during science verification of SPHERE ZIMPOL and demonstrate this facility's performance for faint guide stars under adverse observing conditions.
  • HD 95086 is an intermediate-mass debris-disk-bearing star. VLT/NaCo $3.8 \mu m$ observations revealed it hosts a $5\pm2 \mathrm{M}_{Jup}$ companion (HD 95086 b) at $\simeq 56$ AU. Follow-up observations at 1.66 and 2.18 $\mu m$ yielded a null detection, suggesting extremely red colors for the planet and the need for deeper direct-imaging data. In this Letter, we report H- ($1.7 \mu m$) and $\mathrm{K}_1$- ($2.05 \mu m$) band detections of HD 95086 b from Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) commissioning observations taken by the GPI team. The planet position in both spectral channels is consistent with the NaCo measurements and we confirm it to be comoving. Our photometry yields colors of H-L'= $3.6\pm 1.0$ mag and K$_1$-L'=$2.4\pm 0.7$ mag, consistent with previously reported 5-$\sigma$ upper limits in H and Ks. The photometry of HD 95086 b best matches that of 2M 1207 b and HR 8799 cde. Comparing its spectral energy distribution with the BT-SETTL and LESIA planet atmospheric models yields T$_{\mathrm{eff}}\sim$600-1500 K and log g$\sim$2.1-4.5. Hot-start evolutionary models yield M=$5\pm2$ M$_{Jup}$. Warm-start models reproduce the combined absolute fluxes of the object for M=4-14 M$_{Jup}$ for a wide range of plausible initial conditions (S$_{init}$=8-13 k$_{B}$/baryon). The color-magnitude diagram location of HD 95086 b and its estimated T$_{\mathrm{eff}}$ and log g suggest that the planet is a peculiar L-T transition object with an enhanced amount of photospheric dust.
  • Context. The orbit of the giant planet discovered around beta Pic is slightly inclined with respect to the outer parts of the debris disc, which creates a warp in the inner debris disc. This inclination might be explained by gravitational interactions with other planets. Aims. We aim to search for additional giant planets located at smaller angular separations from the star. Methods. We used the new L'-band AGPM coronagraph on VLT/NACO, which provides an exquisite inner working angle. A long observing sequence was obtained on beta Pic in pupil-tracking mode. To derive sensitivity limits, the collected images were processed using a principal-component analysis technique specifically tailored to angular differential imaging. Results. No additional planet is detected down to an angular separation of 0.2" with a sensitivity better than 5 MJup. Meaningful upper limits (< 10 MJup) are derived down to an angular separation of 0.1", which corresponds to 2 AU at the distance of beta Pic.
  • Context. {\beta} Pictoris b is one of the most studied objects nowadays since it was identified with VLT/NaCo as a bona-fide exoplanet with a mass of about 9 times that of Jupiter at an orbital separation of 8-9 AU. The link between the planet and the dusty disk is unambiguously attested and this system provides an opportunity to study the disk/planet interactions and to constrain formation and evolutionary models of gas giant planets. Still, {\beta} Pictoris b had never been confirmed with other telescopes so far. Aims. We aimed at an independent confirmation using a different instrument. Methods. We retrieved archive images from Gemini South obtained with the instrument NICI, which is designed for high contrast imaging. The observations combine coronagraphy and angular differential imaging and were obtained at three epochs in Nov. 2008, Dec. 2009 and Dec. 2010. Results. We report the detection with NICI of the planet {\beta} Pictoris b in Dec. 2010 images at a separation of 404 \pm 10 mas and P A = 212.1 \pm 0.7{\deg} . It is the first time this planet is observed with a telescope different than the VLT.
  • With the uniquely high contrast within 0.1" (\Delta mag(L') = 5-6.5 magnitudes) available using Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) with NACO at VLT, we detected asymmetry in the flux from the Herbig Fe star HD 142527 with a barycenter emission situated at a projected separation of 88+/-5 mas (12.8+/-1.5 AU at 145 pc) and flux ratios in H, K, and L' of 0.016+/-0.007, 0.012+/-0.008, 0.0086+/-0.0011 respectively (3-\sigma errors) relative to the primary star and disk. After extensive closure-phase modeling, we interpret this detection as a close-in, low-mass stellar companion with an estimated mass of ~0.1-0.4 M_Sun. HD 142527 has a complex disk structure, with an inner gap imaged in both the near and mid-IR as well as a spiral feature in the outer disk in the near-IR. This newly detected low-mass stellar companion may provide a critical explanation of the observed disk structure.
  • Spectral characterization of sub-stellar companions is essential to understand their composition and formation processes. However, the large contrast ratio of the brightness of each object to that of its parent star limits our ability to extract a clean spectrum, free from any significant contribution from the star. During the development of the long slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode of IRDIS, the dual-band imager and spectrograph of SPHERE, we proposed a data analysis method to estimate and remove the contributions of the stellar spectrum. This method has never been tested on real data because of the lack of instrumentation capable of combining adaptive optics (AO), coronagraphy, and LSS. Nonetheless, a similar attenuation of the star can be obtained using a particular observing configuration. Test data were acquired using the AO-assisted spectrograph VLT/NACO. We obtained new J- and H-band spectra of SCR J1845-6357 B, a T6 companion to a nearby (3.85\pm0.02 pc) M8 star. This system is a well-suited benchmark as it is relatively wide (~1.0") with a modest contrast ratio (~4 mag), and a previously published JHK spectrum is available for reference. We demonstrate that (1) our method is efficient at estimating and removing the stellar contribution, (2) it allows to properly recover the spectral shape of the companion, and (3) it is essential to obtain an unbiased estimation of physical parameters. We also show that the slit configuration associated with this method allows us to use long exposure times with high throughput producing high signal-to-noise ratio data. However, the signal of the companion gets over-subtracted, particularly in our J-band data, compelling us to use a fake companion spectrum to estimate and compensate for the loss of flux. Finally, we report a new astrometric measurement of the position of the companion (sep = 0.817", PA = 227.92 deg).
  • Context. A new four-telescope interferometric instrument called PIONIER has recently been installed at VLTI. It provides improved imaging capabilities together with high precision. Aims. We search for low-mass companions around a few bright stars using different strategies, and determine the dynamic range currently reachable with PIONIER. Methods. Our method is based on the closure phase, which is the most robust interferometric quantity when searching for faint companions. We computed the chi^2 goodness of fit for a series of binary star models at different positions and with various flux ratios. The resulting chi^2 cube was used to identify the best-fit binary model and evaluate its significance, or to determine upper limits on the companion flux in case of non detections. Results. No companion is found around Fomalhaut, tau Cet and Regulus. The median upper limits at 3 sigma on the companion flux ratio are respectively of 2.3e-3 (in 4 h), 3.5e-3 (in 3 h) and 5.4e-3 (in 1.5 h) on the search region extending from 5 to 100 mas. Our observations confirm that the previously detected near-infrared excess emissions around Fomalhaut and tau Cet are not related to a low-mass companion, and instead come from an extended source such as an exozodiacal disk. In the case of del Aqr, in 30 min of observation, we obtain the first direct detection of a previously known companion, at an angular distance of about 40 mas and with a flux ratio of 2.05e-2 \pm 0.16e-2. Due to the limited u,v plane coverage, its position can, however, not be unambiguously determined. Conclusions. After only a few months of operation, PIONIER has already achieved one of the best dynamic ranges world-wide for multi-aperture interferometers. A dynamic range up to about 1:500 is demonstrated, but significant improvements are still required to reach the ultimate goal of directly detecting hot giant extrasolar planets.
  • The debris disk known as "The Moth" is named after its unusually asymmetric surface brightness distribution. It is located around the ~90 Myr old G8V star HD 61005 at 34.5 pc and has previously been imaged by the HST at 1.1 and 0.6 microns. Polarimetric observations suggested that the circumstellar material consists of two distinct components, a nearly edge-on disk or ring, and a swept-back feature, the result of interaction with the interstellar medium. We resolve both components at unprecedented resolution with VLT/NACO H-band imaging. Using optimized angular differential imaging techniques to remove the light of the star, we reveal the disk component as a distinct narrow ring at inclination i=84.3 \pm 1.0{\deg}. We determine a semi-major axis of a=61.25 \pm 0.85 AU and an eccentricity of e=0.045 \pm 0.015, assuming that periastron is located along the apparent disk major axis. Therefore, the ring center is offset from the star by at least 2.75 \pm 0.85 AU. The offset, together with a relatively steep inner rim, could indicate a planetary companion that perturbs the remnant planetesimal belt. From our imaging data we set upper mass limits for companions that exclude any object above the deuterium-burning limit for separations down to 0.3". The ring shows a strong brightness asymmetry along both the major and minor axis. A brighter front side could indicate forward-scattering grains, while the brightness difference between the NE and SW components can be only partly explained by the ring center offset, suggesting additional density enhancements on one side of the ring. The swept-back component appears as two streamers originating near the NE and SW edges of the debris ring.
  • Aims. We search for low-mass companions in the innermost region (<300 mas, i.e., 6 AU) of the beta Pic planetary system. Methods. We obtained interferometric closure phase measurements in the K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument used in its medium spectral resolution mode. Fringe stabilization was provided by the FINITO fringe tracker. Results. In a search region of between 2 and 60 mas in radius, our observations exclude at 3 sigma significance the presence of companions with K-band contrasts greater than 5e-3 for 90% of the possible positions in the search zone (i.e., 90% completeness). The median 1-sigma error bar in the contrast of potential companions within our search region is 1.2e-3. The best fit to our data set using a binary model is found for a faint companion located at about 14.4 mas from beta Pic, which has a contrast of 1.8e-3 \pm 1.1e-3 (a result consistent with the absence of companions). For angular separations larger than 60 mas, both time smearing and field-of-view limitations reduce the sensitivity. Conclusions. We can exclude the presence of brown dwarfs with masses higher than 29 Mjup (resp. 47 Mjup) at a 50% (resp. 90%) completeness level within the first few AUs around beta Pic. Interferometric closure phases offer a promising way to directly image low-mass companions in the close environment of nearby young stars.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets requires both high contrast and high spatial resolution. Here, we present the first scientific results obtained with the newly commissioned Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph (APP) on VLT/NACO. We detected the exoplanet beta Pictoris b in the narrow band filter centered at 4.05 micron (NB4.05). The position angle (209.13 +- 2.12 deg) and the projected separation to its host star (0."354 +- 0".012, i.e., 6.8 +- 0.2 AU at a distance of 19.3 pc) are in good agreement with the recently presented data from Lagrange et al. (2010). Comparing the observed NB4.05 magnitude of 11.20 +- 0.23 mag to theoretical atmospheric models we find a best fit with a 7-10 M_Jupiter object for an age of 12 Myr, again in agreement with previous estimates. Combining our results with published L' photometry we can compare the planet's [L' - NB4.05] color to that of cool field dwarfs of higher surface gravity suggesting an effective temperature of ~1700 K. The best fit theoretical model predicts an effective temperature of ~1470 K, but this difference is not significant given our photometric uncertainties. Our results demonstrate the potential of NACO/APP for future planet searches and provides independent confirmation as well as complementary data for beta Pictoris b.
  • The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectro- scopically identified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow, however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here we present adaptive optics (AO) assisted [FeII] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to '' be driving a ~ 0.4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008 (Grankin & Artemenko 2009). Indeed the dy- namical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a time-scale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the time-scale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.
  • The search for substellar companions around stars with different masses along the main sequence is critical to understand the different processes leading to the formation of low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planets. In particular, the existence of a large population of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs physically bound to early-type main-sequence stars could imply that the massive planets recently imaged at wide separations (10-100 AU) around A-type stars are disc-born objects in the low-mass tail of the binary distribution. Our aim is to characterize the environment of early-type main-sequence stars by detecting brown dwarf or low-mass star companions between 10 and 500 AU. High contrast and high angular resolution near-infrared images of a sample of 38 southern A- and F-type stars have been obtained between 2005 and 2009 with the instruments VLT/NaCo and CFHT/PUEO. Multi-epoch observations were performed to discriminate comoving companions from background contaminants. About 41 companion candidates were imaged around 23 stars. Follow-up observations for 83% of these stars allowed us to identify a large number of background contaminants. We report the detection of 7 low-mass stars with masses between 0.1 and 0.8 Msun in 6 multiple systems: the discovery of a M2 companion around the A5V star HD14943 and the detection of the B component of the F4V star HD41742 quadruple system; we resolve the known companion of the F6.5V star HD49095 as a short-period binary system composed by 2 M/L dwarfs. We also resolve the companions to the astrometric binaries iot Crt (F6.5V) and 26 Oph (F3V), and identify a M3/M4 companion to the F4V star omi Gru, associated with a X-ray source. The global multiplicity fraction measured in our sample of A and F stars is >16%. A parallel velocimetric survey of our stars let us conclude that the imaged companions can impact on the observed radial velocity measurements.