• The resemblance between the methods used in quantum-many body physics and in machine learning has drawn considerable attention. In particular, tensor networks (TNs) and deep learning architectures bear striking similarities to the extent that TNs can be used for machine learning. Previous results used one-dimensional TNs in image recognition, showing limited scalability and flexibilities. In this work, we train two-dimensional hierarchical TNs to solve image recognition problems, using a training algorithm derived from the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz. This approach introduces mathematical connections among quantum many-body physics, quantum information theory, and machine learning. While keeping the TN unitary in the training phase, TN states are defined, which encode classes of images into quantum many-body states. We study the quantum features of the TN states, including quantum entanglement and fidelity. We find these quantities could be properties that characterize the image classes, as well as the machine learning tasks.
  • Searching for simple models that possess non-trivial controlling properties is one of the central tasks in the field of quantum technologies. In this work, we construct a quantum spin-$1/2$ chain of finite size, termed as controllable spin wire (CSW), in which we have $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ (Ising) interactions with a transverse field in the bulk, and $\hat{S}^{x} \hat{S}^{z}$ and $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ couplings with a canted field on the boundaries. The Hamiltonians on the boundaries, dubbed as tuning Hamiltonians (TH's), bear the same form as the effective Hamiltonians emerging in the so-called `quantum entanglement simulator' that is originally proposed for mimicking infinite models. We show that tuning the TH's (parametrized by $\alpha$) can trigger non-trivial controlling of the bulk properties, including the degeneracy of energy/entanglement spectra, and the response to the magnetic field $h_{bulk}$ in the bulk. A universal point dubbed as $\alpha^s$ emerges. For $\alpha > \alpha^s$, the ground-state diagram versus $h_{bulk}$ consists of three `phases', which are Ne\'eL and polarized phases, and an emergent pseudo-magnet phase, distinguished by entanglement and magnetization. For $\alpha < \alpha^s$, the phase diagram changes completely, with no step-like behaviors to distinguish phases. Due to its controlling properties and simplicity, the CSW could potentially serve in future the experiments for developing quantum devices.
  • Tensor network (TN), a young mathematical tool of high vitality and great potential, has been undergoing extremely rapid developments in the last two decades, gaining tremendous success in condensed matter physics, atomic physics, quantum information science, statistical physics, and so on. In this lecture notes, we focus on the contraction algorithms of TN as well as some of the applications to the simulations of quantum many-body systems. Starting from basic concepts and definitions, we first explain the relations between TN and physical problems, including the TN representations of classical partition functions, quantum many-body states (by matrix product state, tree TN, and projected entangled pair state), time evolution simulations, etc. These problems, which are challenging to solve, can be transformed to TN contraction problems. We present then several paradigm algorithms based on the ideas of the numerical renormalization group and/or boundary states, including density matrix renormalization group, time-evolving block decimation, coarse-graining/corner tensor renormalization group, and several distinguished variational algorithms. Finally, we revisit the TN approaches from the perspective of multi-linear algebra (also known as tensor algebra or tensor decompositions) and quantum simulation. Despite the apparent differences in the ideas and strategies of different TN algorithms, we aim at revealing the underlying relations and resemblances in order to present a systematic picture to understand the TN contraction approaches.
  • Atomic-level structural changes in materials are important but challenging to study. Here, we demonstrate the dynamics and the possibility of manipulating a phosphorus dopant atom in graphene using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The mechanisms of various processes are explored and compared with those of other dopant species by first-principles calculations. This work paves the way for designing a more precise and optimized protocol for atomic engineering.
  • We explore the frustrated spin-$1/2$ Heisenberg model on the star lattice with antiferromagnetic (AF) couplings inside each triangle and ferromagnetic (FM) inter-triangle couplings ($J_e<0$), and calculate its magnetic and thermodynamic properties. We show that the FM couplings do not sabotage the magnetic disordering of the ground state due to the frustration from the AF interactions inside each triangle, but trigger a fully gapped inversion-symmetry-breaking trimerized valence bond crystal (TVBC) with emergent spin-1 degrees of freedom. We discover that with strengthening $J_e$, the system scales exponentially, either with or without a magnetic field $h$: the order parameter, the five critical fields that separate the $J_e$-$h$ ground-state phase diagram into six phases, and the excitation gap obtained by low-temperature specific heat, all depend exponentially on $J_e$. We calculate the temperature dependence of the specific heat, which can be directly compared with future experiments.
  • Due to the presence of strong correlations, theoretical or experimental investigations of quantum many-body systems belong to the most challenging tasks in modern physics. Stimulated by tensor networks, we propose a scheme of constructing the few-body models that can be easily accessed by theoretical or experimental means, to accurately capture the ground-state properties of infinite many-body systems in higher dimensions. The general idea is to embed a small bulk of the infinite model in an "entanglement bath" so that the many-body effects can be faithfully mimicked. The approach we propose is efficient, simple, flexible, sign-problem-free, and it directly accesses the thermodynamic limit. The numerical results of the spin models on honeycomb and simple cubic lattices show that the ground-state properties including quantum phase transitions and the critical behaviors are accurately captured by only $\mathcal{O}(10)$ physical and bath sites. Moreover, since the few-body Hamiltonian only contains local interactions among a handful of sites, our work provides new ways of studying the many-body phenomena in the infinite strongly-correlated systems by mimicking them in the few-body experiments using cold atoms/ions, or developing novel quantum devices by utilizing the many-body features.
  • We theoretically study the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in graphene with an ac electric field. Based on the tight-binding model, the structure of the half-integer Hall plateaus at $\sigma_{xy} = \pm(n + 1/2)4e^2/h$ ($n$ is an integer) gets qualitatively changed with the addition of new integer Hall plateaus at $\sigma_{xy} = \pm n(4e^2/h)$ starting from the edges of the band center regime towards the band center with an increasing ac field. Beyond a critical field strength, a Hall plateau with $\sigma_{xy} = 0$ can be realized at the band center, hence restoring fully a conventional integer QHE with particle-hole symmetry. Within a low-energy Hamiltonian for Dirac cones merging, we show a very good agreement with the tight-binding calculations for the Hall plateau transitions. We also obtain the band structure for driven graphene ribbons to provide a further understanding on the appearance of the new Hall plateaus, showing a trivial insulator behavior for the $\sigma_{xy} = 0$ state. In the presence of disorder, we numerically study the disorder-induced destruction of the quantum Hall states in a finite driven sample and find that qualitative features known in the undriven disordered case are maintained.
  • Characterizing criticality in quantum many-body systems of dimension $\ge 2$ is one of the most important challenges of the contemporary physics. In principle, there is no generally valid theoretical method that could solve this problem. In this work, we propose an efficient approach to identify the criticality of quantum systems in higher dimensions. Departing from the analysis of the numerical renormalization group flows, we build a general equivalence between the higher-dimensional ground state and a one-dimensional (1D) quantum state defined in the imaginary time direction in terms of the so-called time matrix product state (tMPS). We show that the criticality of the targeted model can be faithfully identified by the tMPS, using the mature scaling schemes of correlation length and entanglement entropy in 1D quantum theories. We benchmark our proposal with the results obtained for the Heisenberg anti-ferromagnet on honeycomb lattice. We demonstrate critical scaling relation of the tMPS for the gapless case, and a trivial scaling for the gapped case with spatial anisotropy. The critical scaling behaviors are insensitive to the system size, suggesting the criticality can be identified in small systems. Our tMPS scheme for critical scaling shows clearly that the spin-1/2 kagom\'e Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a gapless ground state. More generally, the present study indicates that the 1D conformal field theories in imaginary time provide a very useful tool to characterize the criticality of higher dimensional quantum systems.
  • We investigate the ground state and finite-temperature properties of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on an infinite octa-kagome lattice by utilizing state-of-the-art tensor network-based numerical methods. It is shown that the ground state has a vanishing local magnetization and possesses a $1/2$-magnetization plateau with up-down-up-up spin configuration. A quantum phase transition at the critical coupling ratio $J_{d}/J_{t}=0.6$ is found. When $0<J_{d}/J_{t}<0.6$, the system is in a valence bond state, where an obvious zero-magnetization plateau is observed, implying a gapful spin excitation; when $J_{d}/J_{t}>0.6$, the system exhibits a gapless excitation, in which the dimer-dimer correlation is found decaying in a power law, while the spin-spin and chiral-chiral correlation functions decay exponentially. At the isotropic point ($J_{d}/J_{t}=1$), we unveil that at low temperature ($T$) the specific heat depends linearly on $T$, and the susceptibility tends to a constant for $T\rightarrow 0$, giving rise to a Wilson ratio around unity, implying that the system under interest is a fermionic algebraic quantum spin liquid.
  • The continuous imaginary-time quantum Monte Carlo method with the worm update algorithm is applied to explore the ground state properties of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling $J>0$ and ferromagnetic (F) coupling $J^{\prime}<0$ along zigzag and armchair directions, respectively, on honeycomb lattice. It is found that by enhancing the F coupling $J^{\prime}$ between zigzag AF chains, the system is smoothly crossover from one-dimensional zigzag spin chains to a two-dimensional magnetic ordered state. In absence of an external field, the system is in a stripe order phase. In presence of uniform and staggered fields, the uniform and staggered out-of-plane magnetizations appear while the stripe order keeps in $xy$ plane, and a second-order quantum phase transition (QPT) at a critical staggered field is observed. The critical exponents of correlation length for QPTs induced by a staggered field for the cases with $J>0$, $J^{\prime}<0$ and $J<0$, $J^{\prime}>0$ are obtained to be $\nu=0.677(2)$ and $0.693(0)$, respectively, indicating that both cases belong to O(3) universality. The scaling behavior in a staggered field is analyzed, and the ground state phase diagrams in the plane of coupling ratio and staggered field are presented for two cases. The temperature dependence of susceptibility and specific heat of both systems in external magnetic fields is also discussed.
  • Determination and characterization of criticality in two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body systems belong to the most important challenges and problems of quantum physics. In this paper we propose an efficient scheme to solve this problem by utilizing the infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS), and tensor network (TN) representations. We show that the criticality of a 2D state is faithfully reproduced by the ground state (dubbed as boundary state) of a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian constructed from its iPEPS representation. We demonstrate that for a critical state the correlation length and the entanglement spectrum of the boundary state are essentially different from those of a gapped iPEPS. This provides a solid indicator that allows to identify the criticality of the 2D state. Our scheme is verified on the resonating valence bond (RVB) states on kagom\'e and square lattices, where the boundary state of the honeycomb RVB is found to be described by a $c=1$ conformal field theory. We apply our scheme also to the ground state of the spin-1/2 XXZ model on honeycomb lattice, illustrating the difficulties of standard variational TN approaches to study the critical ground states. Our scheme is of high versatility and flexibility, and can be further applied to investigate the quantum criticality in many other phenomena, such as finite-temperature and topological phase transitions.
  • Three different tensor network optimization algorithms are employed to accurately determine the ground state and thermodynamic properties of the spin-3/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet. We found that the $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ state, rather than the $q = 0$ state, is the ground state of this system, and such an ordered state is melted at any finite temperature, thereby clarifying the existing experimental controversies. A 1/3-magnetization plateau in the magnetic curve is observed, being consistent with the experimental observation. The absence of a zero-magnetization plateau indicates a gapless spin excitation that is further supported by the thermodynamic asymptotic behaviors of the susceptibility and specific heat. At low temperatures, the specific heat is shown to exhibit a $\sqrt{T}$ behavior, and the susceptibility approaches a finite constant as $T\rightarrow 0$. Our TN results of thermodynamic properties are compared with those from high temperature series expansion. In addition, we observe a quantum phase transition between $q = 0$ and $\sqrt{3}\times\sqrt{3}$ states in a spin-3/2 kagome XXZ model at the critical point $\Delta_c = 0.408$. This study provides reliable and useful information for further explorations on high spin kagome physics.
  • The quantum phase transition, scaling behaviors, and thermodynamics in the spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic coupling $J>0$ in armchair direction and ferromagnetic interaction $J'<0$ in zigzag direction on a honeycomb lattice are systematically studied using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. By calculating the Binder ratio $Q_{2}$ and spin stiffness $\rho$ in two directions for various coupling ratio $\alpha=J'/J$ under different lattice sizes, we found that a quantum phase transition from the dimerized phase to the stripe phase occurs at the quantum critical point $\alpha_c=-0.93$. Through the finite-size scaling analysis on $Q_{2}$, $\rho_{x}$ and $\rho_{y}$, we determined the critical exponent related to the correlation length $\nu$ to be 0.7212(8), implying that this transition falls into a classical Heisenberg O(3) universality. A zero magnetization plateau is observed in the dimerized phase, whose width decreases with increasing $\alpha$. A phase diagram in the coupling ratio $\alpha$-magnetic field $h$ plane is obtained, where four phases, including dimerized, stripe, canted stripe and polarized phases are identified. It is also unveiled that the temperature dependence of the specific heat $C(T)$ for different $\alpha$'s intersects precisely at one point, similar to that of liquid $^{3}$He under different pressures and several magnetic compounds under various magnetic fields. The scaling behaviors of $Q_{2}$, $\rho$ and $C(T)$ are carefully analyzed. The susceptibility is well compared with the experimental data to give the magnetic parameters of both compounds.
  • New classes two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport property is one of the fundamental physical parameters. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of $GeS$, $GeSe$, $SnS$ and $SnSe$ by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite the similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity ($\kappa$), etc. Especially, the $\kappa$ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer $GeS$ shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer $SnS$ and $SnSe$ shows an almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in detail. With limited size, the $\kappa$ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications in nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and aplications in emerging technologies.
  • By means of first-principles calculations, we explore systematically the geometric, electronic and piezoelectric properties of multilayer SnSe. We find that these properties are layer-dependent, indicating that the interlayer interaction plays an important role. With increasing the number of SnSe layers from 1 to 6, we observe that the lattice constant decreases from 4.27 $\mathring{A}$ to 4.22 $\mathring{A}$ along zigzag direction, and increases from 4.41 $\mathring{A}$ to 4.51 $\mathring{A}$ along armchair direction close to the bulk limit (4.21 $\mathring{A}$ and 4.52 $\mathring{A}$, respectively); the band gap decreases from 1.45 eV to 1.08 eV, approaching the bulk gap 0.95 eV. Although the monolayer SnSe exhibits almost symmetric geometric and electronic structures along zigzag and armchair directions, bulk SnSe is obviously anisotropic, showing that the stacking of layers enhances the anisotropic character of SnSe. As bulk and even-layer SnSe have inversion centers, they cannot exhibit piezoelectric responses. However, we show that the odd-layer SnSe have piezoelectric coefficients much higher than those of the known piezoelectric materials, suggesting that the odd-layer SnSe is a good piezoelectric material.
  • The anisotropic antiferromagnetic Ising model on the fractal Sierpi\'{n}ski gasket is intensively studied, and a number of exotic properties are disclosed. The ground state phase diagram in the plane of magnetic field-interaction of the system is obtained. The thermodynamic properties of the three plateau phases are probed by exploring the temperature-dependence of magnetization, specific heat, susceptibility and spin-spin correlations. No phase transitions are observed in this model. In the absence of a magnetic field, the unusual temperature dependence of the spin correlation length is obtained with $0 \leq$J$_b/$J$_a<1$, and an interesting crossover behavior between different phases at J$_b/$J$_a=1$ is unveiled, whose dynamics can be described by the J$_b/$J$_a$-dependence of the specific heat, susceptibility and spin correlation functions. The exotic spin-spin correlation patterns that share the same special rotational symmetry as that of the Sierpi\'{n}ski gasket are obtained in both the $1/3$ plateau disordered phase and the $5/9$ plateau partially ordered ferrimagnetic phase. Moreover, a quantum scheme is formulated to study the thermodynamics of the fractal Sierpi\'{n}ski gasket with Heisenberg interactions. We find that the unusual temperature dependence of the correlation length remains intact in a small quantum fluctuation.
  • Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.
  • By performing extensive first-principles calculations, we found that SnSe monolayer is an indirect band gap 1.45 eV semiconductor with many outstanding properties, including a large negative Poisson's ratio of -0.17, a very low lattice thermal conductivity below 3 Wm-1K-1, and a high hole mobility of order 10000 cm2V-1S-1. In contrast to phosphorene with similar hinge-like structure, SnSe monolayer has unexpectedly symmetric phonon and electronic structures, and nearly isotropic lattice thermal conductivity and carrier effective mass. However, the electronic responses to strain are sensitive and anisotropic, leading to indirect-direct band gap transitions under a rather low stress below 0.5 GPa and a highly anisotropic carrier mobility. These intriguing properties make monolayer SnSe a promising two-dimensional material for nanomechanics, thermoelectrics, and optoelectronics.
  • Nano-scaled dielectric and metallic structures are popular light tapping structures in thin-film solar cells. However, a large parasitic absorption in those structures is unavoidable. Most schemes based on such structures also involve the textured active layers that may bring undesirable degradation of the material quality. Here we propose a novel and cheap light trapping structure based on the prism structured SiO2 for thin-film solar cells, and a flat active layer is introduced purposefully. Such a light trapping structure is imposed by the geometrical shape optimization to gain the best optical benefit. By examining our scheme, it is disclosed that the conversion efficiency of the flat a-Si:H thin-film solar cell can be promoted to exceed the currently certified highest value. As the cost of SiO2-based light trapping structure is much cheaper and easier to fabricate than other materials, this proposal would have essential impact and wide applications in thin-film solar cells.
  • We investigate the ground state properties of a spin-1 kagome antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model using tensor-network (TN) methods. We obtain the energy per site {$e_0=-1.41090(2)$ with $D^*=8$ multiplets retained (i.e., a bond dimension of $D=24$), and $e_0=-1.4116(4)$ from large-$D$ extrapolation,} by accurate TN calculations directly in the thermodynamic limit. The symmetry between the two kinds of triangles is spontaneously broken, with a relative energy difference of $\delta \approx$ 19\%, i.e, there is a trimerization (simplex) valence-bond order in the ground state. The spin-spin, dimer-dimer, and chirality-chirality correlation functions are found to decay exponentially with a rather short correlation length, showing that the ground state is gapped. We thus identify the ground state be a simplex valence-bond crystal (SVBC). We also discuss the spin-1 bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a kagome lattice, and determine its ground state phase diagram. Moreover, we implement non-abelian symmetries, here spin SU(2), in the TN algorithm, which improves the efficiency greatly and provides insight into the tensor structures.
  • We derive a general scaling relation for the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms, described by a quadratic hypersurface in the space spanned by the partial resistivities. We also present experimental findings, which show strong deviation from previously found scaling forms when different scattering mechanism compete in strength but can be nicely explained by our theory.
  • Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and the ground-state phase diagram of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg-Ising alternating chain (HIAC) with uniform Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction are investigated by a matrix-product-state (MPS) method. By calculating the odd- and even-string order parameters, we recognize two kinds of Haldane phases, i.e., the odd- and even-Haldane phases. Furthermore, doubly degenerate entanglement spectra on odd and even bonds are observed in odd- and even-Haldane phases, respectively. A rich phase diagram including four different phases, i.e., an antiferromagnetic (AF), AF stripe, odd- and even-Haldane phases, is obtained. These phases are found to be separated by continuous QPTs: the topological QPT between the odd- and even-Haldane phases is verified to be continuous and corresponds to conformal field theory with central charge $c$=1; while the rest phase transitions in the phase diagram are found to be $c$=1/2. We also revisit, with our MPS method, the exactly solvable case of HIAC model with DM interactions only on odd bonds, and find that the even-Haldane phase disappears, but the other three phases, i.e., the AF, AF stripe, and odd-Haldane phases, still remain in the phase diagram. We exhibit the evolution of the even-Haldane phase by tuning the DM interactions on the even bonds gradually.
  • Phosphorene, the single layer counterpart of black phosphorus, is a novel two-dimensional semiconductor with high carrier mobility and a large fundamental direct band gap, which has attracted tremendous interest recently. Its potential applications in nano-electronics and thermoelectrics call for a fundamental study of the phonon transport. Here, we calculate the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of phosphorene by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. The thermal conductivity of phosphorene at $300\,\mathrm{K}$ is $30.15\,\mathrm{Wm^{-1}K^{-1}}$ (zigzag) and $13.65\,\mathrm{Wm^{-1}K^{-1}}$ (armchair), showing an obvious anisotropy along different directions. The calculated thermal conductivity fits perfectly to the inverse relation with temperature when the temperature is higher than Debye temperature ($\Theta_D = 278.66\,\mathrm{K}$). In comparison to graphene, the minor contribution around $5\%$ of the ZA mode is responsible for the low thermal conductivity of phosphorene. In addition, the representative mean free path (MFP), a critical size for phonon transport, is also obtained.
  • We propose a systematic scheme to reach the properties of two-dimensional (2D) statistical and quantum systems by studying the effective (1+1)-dimensional theory that is constructed from the tensor network representation. On on hand, we discover that the degeneracy of the 2D system can be determined by the purity of the boundary thermal state, which is the density operator of the effective theory at zero (effective) temperature. On the other hand, we find that the gapped (or critical) 2D system leads to a gapped (or critical) effective (1+1)-dimensional theory whose criticality can be accessed by the entanglement entropy $S$ of its ground state dubbed as boundary pure state. We also uncover that for the critical systems, $S$ obeys the same logarithmic law as that found in the critical 1D quantum chains, which reads $S = (\kappa c/6)\log_2 D + const.$, with $c$ the central charge and $\kappa$ a constant related to the scaling property of the correlation length $\xi$ as $\xi \sim D^{\kappa}$. Such a scaling law presents an efficient way to characterize the critical universality class of the original 2D systems. An important implication of our work is that many well-established theories for 1D quantum chains become available for studying 2D systems with the help of the proposed lower dimensional correspondence.
  • Nano-scaled metallic or dielectric structures may provide various ways to trap light into thin-film solar cells for improving the conversion efficiency. In most schemes, the textured active layers are involved into light trapping structures that can provide perfect optical benefits but also bring undesirable degradation of electrical performance. Here we propose a novel approach to design high-performance thin-film solar cells. In our strategy, a flat active layer is adopted for avoiding electrical degradation, and an optimization algorithm is applied to seek for an optimized light trapping structure for the best optical benefit. As an example, we show that the efficiency of a flat a-Si:H thin-film solar cell can be promoted close to the certified highest value. It is also pointed out that, by choosing appropriate dielectric materials with high refractive index (>3) and high transmissivity in wavelength region of 350nm-800nm, the conversion efficiency of solar cells can be further enhanced.