• In today's cyber-enabled smart grids, high penetration of uncertain renewables, purposeful manipulation of meter readings, and the need for wide-area situational awareness, call for fast, accurate, and robust power system state estimation. The least-absolute-value (LAV) estimator is known for its robustness relative to the weighted least-squares (WLS) one. However, due to nonconvexity and nonsmoothness, existing LAV solvers based on linear programming are typically slow, hence inadequate for real-time system monitoring. This paper develops two novel algorithms for efficient LAV estimation, which draw from recent advances in composite optimization. The first is a deterministic linear proximal scheme that handles a sequence of convex quadratic problems, each efficiently solvable either via off-the-shelf algorithms or through the alternating direction method of multipliers. Leveraging the sparse connectivity inherent to power networks, the second scheme is stochastic, and updates only \emph{a few} entries of the complex voltage state vector per iteration. In particular, when voltage magnitude and (re)active power flow measurements are used only, this number reduces to one or two, \emph{regardless of} the number of buses in the network. This computational complexity evidently scales well to large-size power systems. Furthermore, by carefully \emph{mini-batching} the voltage and power flow measurements, accelerated implementation of the stochastic iterations becomes possible. The developed algorithms are numerically evaluated using a variety of benchmark power networks. Simulated tests corroborate that improved robustness can be attained at comparable or markedly reduced computation times for medium- or large-size networks relative to the "workhorse" WLS-based Gauss-Newton iterations.
  • The traffic in wireless networks has become diverse and fluctuating both spatially and temporally due to the emergence of new wireless applications and the complexity of scenarios. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the wireless traffic, which fluctuates violently both spatially and temporally, on the performance of the wireless networks. Specially, we propose to combine the tools from stochastic geometry and queueing theory to model the spatial and temporal fluctuation of traffic, which to our best knowledge has seldom been evaluated analytically. We derive the spatial and temporal statistics, the total arrival rate, the stability of queues and the delay of users by considering two different spatial properties of traffic, i.e., the uniformly and non-uniformly distributed cases. The numerical results indicate that although the fluctuations of traffic when the users are clustered, reflected by the variance of total arrival rate, is much fiercer than that when the users are uniformly distributed, the stability performance is much better. Our work provides a useful reference for the design of wireless networks when the complex spatio-temporal fluctuation of the traffic is considered.
  • The isobaric collisions of $^{96}_{44}$Ru + $^{96}_{44}$Ru and $^{96}_{40}$Zr + $^{96}_{40}$Zr have recently been proposed to discern the charge separation signal of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). In this article, we employ the string melting version of a multiphase transport model to predict various charged-particle observables, including $dN/d\eta$, $p_T$ spectra, elliptic flow ($v_2$), and particularly possible CME signals in Ru + Ru and Zr + Zr collisions at $\sqrt{s_{_{\rm NN}}}$ = 200 GeV. Two sets of the nuclear structure parametrization have been explored, and the difference between the two isobaric collisions appears to be small, in terms of $dN/d\eta$, $p_T$ spectra, and $v_2$ for charged particles. We mimic the CME by introducing an initial charge separation that is proportional to the magnetic field produced in the collision, and study how the final-state interactions affect the CME observables. The relative difference in the CME signal between the two isobaric collisions is found to be robust, insensitive to the final-state interactions.
  • The settling of colloidal particles with short-ranged attractions is investigated via highly resolved immersed boundary simulations. At modest volume fractions, we show that inter-colloid attractions lead to clustering that reduces the hinderance to settling imposed by fluid back flow. For sufficient attraction strength, increasing the particle concentration grows the particle clusters, which further increases the mean settling rate in a physical mode termed promoted settling. The immersed boundary simulations are compared to recent experimental measurements of the settling rate in nanoparticle dispersions for which particles are driven to aggregate by short-ranged depletion attractions. The simulations are able to quantitatively reproduce the experimental results. We show that a simple, empirical model for the settling rate of adhesive hard sphere dispersions can be derived from a combination of the experimental and computational data as well as analytical results valid in certain asymptotic limits of the concentration and attraction strength. This model naturally extends the Richardson-Zaki formalism used to describe hindered settling of hard, repulsive spheres. Experimental measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient in concentrated solutions of globular proteins are used to illustrate inference of effective interaction parameters for sticky, globular macromolecules using this new empirical model. Finally, application of the simulation methods and empirical model to other colloidal systems are discussed.
  • Typical person re-identification (ReID) methods usually describe each pedestrian with a single feature vector and match them in a task-specific metric space. However, the methods based on a single feature vector are not sufficient enough to overcome visual ambiguity, which frequently occurs in real scenario. In this paper, we propose a novel end-to-end trainable framework, called Dual ATtention Matching network (DuATM), to learn context-aware feature sequences and perform attentive sequence comparison simultaneously. The core component of our DuATM framework is a dual attention mechanism, in which both intra-sequence and inter-sequence attention strategies are used for feature refinement and feature-pair alignment, respectively. Thus, detailed visual cues contained in the intermediate feature sequences can be automatically exploited and properly compared. We train the proposed DuATM network as a siamese network via a triplet loss assisted with a de-correlation loss and a cross-entropy loss. We conduct extensive experiments on both image and video based ReID benchmark datasets. Experimental results demonstrate the significant advantages of our approach compared to the state-of-the-art methods.
  • Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a powerful technique for discovering whether or not hidden sources are commonly present in two (or more) datasets. Its well-appreciated merits include dimensionality reduction, clustering, classification, feature selection, and data fusion. The standard CCA however, does not exploit the geometry of the common sources, which may be available from the given data or can be deduced from (cross-) correlations. In this paper, this extra information provided by the common sources generating the data is encoded in a graph, and is invoked as a graph regularizer. This leads to a novel graph-regularized CCA approach, that is termed graph (g) CCA. The novel gCCA accounts for the graph-induced knowledge of common sources, while minimizing the distance between the wanted canonical variables. Tailored for diverse practical settings where the number of data is smaller than the data vector dimensions, the dual formulation of gCCA is also developed. One such setting includes kernels that are incorporated to account for nonlinear data dependencies. The resultant graph-kernel (gk) CCA is also obtained in closed form. Finally, corroborating image classification tests over several real datasets are presented to showcase the merits of the novel linear, dual, and kernel approaches relative to competing alternatives.
  • Taking into account the interplay between the disorder and Coulomb interactions, the phase diagram of three-dimensional anisotropic-Weyl semimetal is studied by renormalization group theory. It is well established that the weak disorder is irrelevant in 3D anisotropic-Weyl semimetal, while the strong disorder makes sense which drives a quantum phase transition from semimetal to compressible diffusive metal. The long-range Coulomb interaction is irrelevant in clean anistropic Weyl semimetal. However, we find that the long-range Coulomb interaction exerts a dramatic influence on the critical disorder strength for phase transition to compressible diffusive metal. Specifically, the critical disorder strength can receive prominent changes even though an arbitrarily small value of Coulomb interaction is included. This novel behavior is closely related to the anisotropic screening effect of long-range Coulomb interaction, and essentially results from the specifical energy dispersion of the fermions in three-dimensional anisotropic Weyl semimetal.
  • Image captioning is a multimodal task involving computer vision and natural language processing, where the goal is to learn a mapping from the image to its natural language description. In general, the mapping function is learned from a training set of image-caption pairs. However, for some language, large scale image-caption paired corpus might not be available. We present an approach to this unpaired image captioning problem by language pivoting. Our method can effectively capture the characteristics of an image captioner from the pivot language (Chinese) and align it to the target language (English) using another pivot-target (Chinese-English) parallel corpus. We evaluate our method on two image-to-English benchmark datasets: MSCOCO and Flickr30K. Quantitative comparisons against several baseline approaches demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.
  • The existing image captioning approaches typically train a one-stage sentence decoder, which is difficult to generate rich fine-grained descriptions. On the other hand, multi-stage image caption model is hard to train due to the vanishing gradient problem. In this paper, we propose a coarse-to-fine multi-stage prediction framework for image captioning, composed of multiple decoders each of which operates on the output of the previous stage, producing increasingly refined image descriptions. Our proposed learning approach addresses the difficulty of vanishing gradients during training by providing a learning objective function that enforces intermediate supervisions. Particularly, we optimize our model with a reinforcement learning approach which utilizes the output of each intermediate decoder's test-time inference algorithm as well as the output of its preceding decoder to normalize the rewards, which simultaneously solves the well-known exposure bias problem and the loss-evaluation mismatch problem. We extensively evaluate the proposed approach on MSCOCO and show that our approach can achieve the state-of-the-art performance.
  • This paper proposes a new method called Multimodal RNNs for RGB-D scene semantic segmentation. It is optimized to classify image pixels given two input sources: RGB color channels and Depth maps. It simultaneously performs training of two recurrent neural networks (RNNs) that are crossly connected through information transfer layers, which are learnt to adaptively extract relevant cross-modality features. Each RNN model learns its representations from its own previous hidden states and transferred patterns from the other RNNs previous hidden states; thus, both model-specific and crossmodality features are retained. We exploit the structure of quad-directional 2D-RNNs to model the short and long range contextual information in the 2D input image. We carefully designed various baselines to efficiently examine our proposed model structure. We test our Multimodal RNNs method on popular RGB-D benchmarks and show how it outperforms previous methods significantly and achieves competitive results with other state-of-the-art works.
  • The interplay of magnetism and superconductivity (SC) has been a focus of interest in condensed matter physics for decades. EuFe2As2 has been identified as a potential platform to investigate interactions between structural, magnetic, electronic effects as well as coexistence of magnetism and SC with similar transition temperatures. However, there are obvious inconsistencies in the reported phase diagrams of Eu(Fe1-xCox)2As2 crystals grown by different methods. For transition metal arsenide (TMA)-flux-grown crystals, even the existence of SC is open for dispute. Here we re-examine the phase diagram of single-crystalline Eu(Fe1-xCox)2As2 grown by TMA flux. We found that the lattice parameter c shrinks linearly with Co doping, almost twice as fast as that of the tin-flux-grown crystals. With Co doping, the spin-density-wave (SDW) order of Fe sublattice is quickly suppressed, being detected only up to x = 0.08. The magnetic ordering temperature of the Eu2+ sublattice (TEu) shows a systematic evolution with Co doping, first going down and reaching a minimum at x = 0.08, then increasing continuously up to x = 0.24. Over the whole composition range investigated, no signature of SC is observed.
  • Email spoofing is a critical step of phishing, where the attacker impersonates someone the victim knows or trusts. In this paper, we conduct a qualitative study to explore why email spoofing is still possible after years of efforts to develop and deploy anti-spoofing protocols (e.g., SPF, DKIM, DMARC). First, we measure the protocol adoption by scanning 1 million Internet domains. We find the adoption rates are still low, especially for the new DMARC (3.1%). Second, to understand the reasons behind the low-adoption rate, we collect 4293 discussion threads (25.7K messages) from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), a working group formed to develop and promote Internet standards. Our analysis shows key security and usability limitations in the protocol design, which makes it difficult to generate a positive "net effect" for a wide adoption. We validate our results by interviewing email administrators and discuss key implications for future anti-spoofing solutions.
  • It is desirable to train convolutional networks (CNNs) to run more efficiently during inference. In many cases however, the computational budget that the system has for inference cannot be known beforehand during training, or the inference budget is dependent on the changing real-time resource availability. Thus, it is inadequate to train just inference-efficient CNNs, whose inference costs are not adjustable and cannot adapt to varied inference budgets. We propose a novel approach for cost-adjustable inference in CNNs - Stochastic Downsampling Point (SDPoint). During training, SDPoint applies feature map downsampling to a random point in the layer hierarchy, with a random downsampling ratio. The different stochastic downsampling configurations known as SDPoint instances (of the same model) have computational costs different from each other, while being trained to minimize the same prediction loss. Sharing network parameters across different instances provides significant regularization boost. During inference, one may handpick a SDPoint instance that best fits the inference budget. The effectiveness of SDPoint, as both a cost-adjustable inference approach and a regularizer, is validated through extensive experiments on image classification.
  • Human action recognition in 3D skeleton sequences has attracted a lot of research attention. Recently, Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks have shown promising performance in this task due to their strengths in modeling the dependencies and dynamics in sequential data. As not all skeletal joints are informative for action recognition, and the irrelevant joints often bring noise which can degrade the performance, we need to pay more attention to the informative ones. However, the original LSTM network does not have explicit attention ability. In this paper, we propose a new class of LSTM network, Global Context-Aware Attention LSTM (GCA-LSTM), for skeleton based action recognition. This network is capable of selectively focusing on the informative joints in each frame of each skeleton sequence by using a global context memory cell. To further improve the attention capability of our network, we also introduce a recurrent attention mechanism, with which the attention performance of the network can be enhanced progressively. Moreover, we propose a stepwise training scheme in order to train our network effectively. Our approach achieves state-of-the-art performance on five challenging benchmark datasets for skeleton based action recognition.
  • The new hemispherical photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with 9 inch diameter from Hainan Zhanchuang Photonics Technology Co.,Ltd (HZC) have been studied. Narrow transit time spread (FWHM=2.35 ns) accompanied by small nonlinearity (750 photoelectrons at 5%) and high gain (1E7 ) with good single photoelectron (PE) resolution have been observed. 11 PMTs of this type are deployed and studied in the prototype detector for JUNO at IHEP, China.
  • Recently, deep learning has achieved very promising results in visual object tracking. Deep neural networks in existing tracking methods require a lot of training data to learn a large number of parameters. However, training data is not sufficient for visual object tracking as annotations of a target object are only available in the first frame of a test sequence. In this paper, we propose to learn hierarchical features for visual object tracking by using tree structure based Recursive Neural Networks (RNN), which have fewer parameters than other deep neural networks, e.g. Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN). First, we learn RNN parameters to discriminate between the target object and background in the first frame of a test sequence. Tree structure over local patches of an exemplar region is randomly generated by using a bottom-up greedy search strategy. Given the learned RNN parameters, we create two dictionaries regarding target regions and corresponding local patches based on the learned hierarchical features from both top and leaf nodes of multiple random trees. In each of the subsequent frames, we conduct sparse dictionary coding on all candidates to select the best candidate as the new target location. In addition, we online update two dictionaries to handle appearance changes of target objects. Experimental results demonstrate that our feature learning algorithm can significantly improve tracking performance on benchmark datasets.
  • Mini-jets and mini-dijets provide useful information on multiple parton interactions in the low transverse-momentum (low-$p_T$) region. As a first step to identify mini-jets and mini-dijets, we study the clustering properties of produced particles in the pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle space, in high-energy $pp$ collisions. We develop an algorithm to find mini-jet-like clusters by using the k-means clustering method, in conjunction with a k-number (cluster number) selection principle. We test the clustering algorithm using minimum-bias events generated by PYTHIA8.1, for $pp$ collision at $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV. We find that multiple mini-jet-like and mini-dijet-like clusters of low-$p_T$ hadrons occur in high multiplicity events. However similar clustering properties are also present for particles produced randomly in a finite pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle space. The ability to identify an azimuthally back-to-back correlated mini-jet-like clusters as physical mini-jets and mini-dijets will therefore depend on the additional independent assessment of the dominance of the parton-parton hard-scattering process in the low-$p_T$ region.
  • The email system is the central battleground against phishing and social engineering attacks, and yet email providers still face key challenges to authenticate incoming emails. As a result, attackers can apply spoofing techniques to impersonate a trusted entity to conduct highly deceptive phishing attacks. In this work, we study email spoofing to answer three key questions: (1) How do email providers detect and handle forged emails? (2) Under what conditions can forged emails penetrate the defense to reach user inbox? (3) Once the forged email gets in, how email providers warn users? Is the warning truly effective? We answer these questions through end-to-end measurements on 35 popular email providers (used by billions of users), and extensive user studies (N = 913) that consist of both simulated and real-world phishing experiments. We have four key findings. First, most popular email providers have the necessary protocols to detect spoofing, but still allow forged emails to get into user inbox (e.g., Yahoo Mail, iCloud, Gmail). Second, once a forged email gets in, most email providers have no warnings for users, particularly on mobile email apps. Some providers (e.g., Gmail Inbox) even have misleading UIs that make the forged email look authentic. Third, a few email providers (9/35) have implemented visual security cues for unverified emails, which demonstrate a positive impact to reduce risky user actions. Comparing simulated experiments with realistic phishing tests, we observe that the impact of security cue is less significant when users are caught off guard in the real-world setting.
  • Atomically thin materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit remarkable physical properties resulting from their reduced dimensionality and crystal symmetry. The family of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is an especially promising platform for fundamental studies of two-dimensional (2D) systems, with potential applications in optoelectronics and valleytronics due to their direct band gap in the monolayer limit and highly efficient light-matter coupling. A crystal lattice with broken inversion symmetry combined with strong spin-orbit interactions leads to a unique combination of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. In addition, the 2D character of the monolayers and weak dielectric screening from the environment yield a significant enhancement of the Coulomb interaction. The resulting formation of bound electron-hole pairs, or excitons, dominates the optical and spin properties of the material. Here we review recent progress in our understanding of the excitonic properties in monolayer TMDs and lay out future challenges. We focus on the consequences of the strong direct and exchange Coulomb interaction, discuss exciton-light interaction and effects of other carriers and excitons on electron-hole pairs in TMDs. Finally, the impact on valley polarization is described and the tuning of the energies and polarization observed in applied electric and magnetic fields is summarized.
  • In the last few years, deep learning has led to very good performance on a variety of problems, such as visual recognition, speech recognition and natural language processing. Among different types of deep neural networks, convolutional neural networks have been most extensively studied. Leveraging on the rapid growth in the amount of the annotated data and the great improvements in the strengths of graphics processor units, the research on convolutional neural networks has been emerged swiftly and achieved state-of-the-art results on various tasks. In this paper, we provide a broad survey of the recent advances in convolutional neural networks. We detailize the improvements of CNN on different aspects, including layer design, activation function, loss function, regularization, optimization and fast computation. Besides, we also introduce various applications of convolutional neural networks in computer vision, speech and natural language processing.
  • Owing to their low-complexity iterations, Frank-Wolfe (FW) solvers are well suited for various large-scale learning tasks. When block-separable constraints are present, randomized block FW (RB-FW) has been shown to further reduce complexity by updating only a fraction of coordinate blocks per iteration. To circumvent the limitations of existing methods, the present work develops step sizes for RB-FW that enable a flexible selection of the number of blocks to update per iteration while ensuring convergence and feasibility of the iterates. To this end, convergence rates of RB-FW are established through computational bounds on a primal sub-optimality measure and on the duality gap. The novel bounds extend the existing convergence analysis, which only applies to a step-size sequence that does not generally lead to feasible iterates. Furthermore, two classes of step-size sequences that guarantee feasibility of the iterates are also proposed to enhance flexibility in choosing decay rates. The novel convergence results are markedly broadened to encompass also nonconvex objectives, and further assert that RB-FW with exact line-search reaches a stationary point at rate $\mathcal{O}(1/\sqrt{t})$. Performance of RB-FW with different step sizes and number of blocks is demonstrated in two applications, namely charging of electrical vehicles and structural support vector machines. Extensive simulated tests demonstrate the performance improvement of RB-FW relative to existing randomized single-block FW methods.
  • We propose a novel approach to enhance the discriminability of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN). The key idea is to build a tree structure that could progressively learn fine-grained features to distinguish a subset of classes, by learning features only among these classes. Such features are expected to be more discriminative, compared to features learned for all the classes. We develop a new algorithm to effectively learn the tree structure from a large number of classes. Experiments on large-scale image classification tasks demonstrate that our method could boost the performance of a given basic CNN model. Our method is quite general, hence it can potentially be used in combination with many other deep learning models.
  • Deluge Networks (DelugeNets) are deep neural networks which efficiently facilitate massive cross-layer information inflows from preceding layers to succeeding layers. The connections between layers in DelugeNets are established through cross-layer depthwise convolutional layers with learnable filters, acting as a flexible yet efficient selection mechanism. DelugeNets can propagate information across many layers with greater flexibility and utilize network parameters more effectively compared to ResNets, whilst being more efficient than DenseNets. Remarkably, a DelugeNet model with just model complexity of 4.31 GigaFLOPs and 20.2M network parameters, achieve classification errors of 3.76% and 19.02% on CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100 dataset respectively. Moreover, DelugeNet-122 performs competitively to ResNet-200 on ImageNet dataset, despite costing merely half of the computations needed by the latter.
  • This paper presents a new algorithm, termed \emph{truncated amplitude flow} (TAF), to recover an unknown vector $\bm{x}$ from a system of quadratic equations of the form $y_i=|\langle\bm{a}_i,\bm{x}\rangle|^2$, where $\bm{a}_i$'s are given random measurement vectors. This problem is known to be \emph{NP-hard} in general. We prove that as soon as the number of equations is on the order of the number of unknowns, TAF recovers the solution exactly (up to a global unimodular constant) with high probability and complexity growing linearly with both the number of unknowns and the number of equations. Our TAF approach adopts the \emph{amplitude-based} empirical loss function, and proceeds in two stages. In the first stage, we introduce an \emph{orthogonality-promoting} initialization that can be obtained with a few power iterations. Stage two refines the initial estimate by successive updates of scalable \emph{truncated generalized gradient iterations}, which are able to handle the rather challenging nonconvex and nonsmooth amplitude-based objective function. In particular, when vectors $\bm{x}$ and $\bm{a}_i$'s are real-valued, our gradient truncation rule provably eliminates erroneously estimated signs with high probability to markedly improve upon its untruncated version. Numerical tests using synthetic data and real images demonstrate that our initialization returns more accurate and robust estimates relative to spectral initializations. Furthermore, even under the same initialization, the proposed amplitude-based refinement outperforms existing Wirtinger flow variants, corroborating the superior performance of TAF over state-of-the-art algorithms.
  • This chapter aspires to glean some of the recent advances in power system state estimation (PSSE), though our collection is not exhaustive by any means. The Cram{\'e}r-Rao bound, a lower bound on the (co)variance of any unbiased estimator, is first derived for the PSSE setup. After reviewing the classical Gauss-Newton iterations, contemporary PSSE solvers leveraging relaxations to convex programs and successive convex approximations are explored. A disciplined paradigm for distributed and decentralized schemes is subsequently exemplified under linear(ized) and exact grid models. Novel bad data processing models and fresh perspectives linking critical measurements to cyber-attacks on the state estimator are presented. Finally, spurred by advances in online convex optimization, model-free and model-based state trackers are reviewed.