• We present a statistical study of the planet-metallicity (P-M) correlation, by comparing the 744 stars with candidate planets (SWPs) in the Kepler field which have been observed with LAMOST, and a sample of distance-independent, fake "twin" stars in the Kepler field with no planet reported (CKSNPs) yet. With the well-defined and carefully-selected large samples, we find for the first time a turn-off P-M correlation of Delta [Fe/H]_(SWPs-SNPs), which in average increases from ~0.00+-0.03 dex to 0.06+-0.03 dex, and to 0.12+-0.03 for stars with Earth, Neptune, Jupiter-sized planets successively, and then declines to ~-0.01+-0.03 dex for more massive planets or brown dwarfs. Moreover, the percentage of those systems with positive Delta[Fe/H] has the same turn-off pattern. We also find FG-type stars follow this general trend, but K-type stars are different. Moderate metal enhancement (~0.1-0.2 dex) for K-type stars with planets of radii between 2 to 4 Earth radius as compared to CKSNPs is observed, which indicates much higher metallicities are required for Super-Earths, Neptune-sized planets to form around K-type stars. We point out that the P-M correlation is actually metallicity-dependent, i.e., the correlation is positive at solar and super-solar metallicities, and negative at subsolar metallicities. No steady increase of Delta[Fe/H] against planet sizes is observed for rocky planets, excluding the pollution scenario as a major mechanism for the P-M correlation. All these clues suggest that giant planets probably form differently from rocky planets or more massive planets/brown dwarfs, and the core-accretion scenario is highly favoured, and high metallicity is a prerequisite for massive planets to form.
  • We present broadband cavity-enhanced complex refractive index spectroscopy (CE-CRIS), a technique for calibration-free determination of the complex refractive index of entire molecular bands via direct measurement of transmission modes of a Fabry-Perot cavity filled with the sample. The measurement of the cavity transmission spectrum is done using an optical frequency comb and a mechanical Fourier transform spectrometer with sub-nominal resolution. Molecular absorption and dispersion spectra (corresponding to the imaginary and real parts of the refractive index) are obtained from the cavity mode broadening and shift retrieved from fits of Lorentzian profiles to the individual cavity modes. This method is calibration-free because the mode broadening and shift are independent of the cavity parameters such as the length and mirror reflectivity. In this first demonstration of broadband CE-CRIS we measure simultaneously the absorption and dispersion spectra of three combination bands of CO2 in the range between 1525 nm and 1620 nm and achieve good agreement with theoretical models. This opens up for precision spectroscopy of the complex refractive index of several molecular bands simultaneously.
  • In this paper we report two new super Li-rich K giants: KIC 2305930 and KIC 12645107 with Li abundances exceeding that of ISM (A(Li) $\geq$ 3.2 dex). Importantly, both the giants have been classified as core He-burning red clump stars based on asteroseismic data from Kepler mission. Also, both the stars are found to be low mass (M $\approx$ 1.0 M$_{\odot}$) which, together with an evidence of their evolutionary status of being red clump imply that the stars have gone through both the luminosity bump and He-flash during their RGB evolution. Stars' large Li abundance and evolutionary phase suggest that Li enrichment occurred very recently probably at the tip of RGB either during He-flash, an immediate preceding event on RGB, or by some kind of external event such as merger of RGB star with white dwarf. The findings will provide critical constraints to theoretical models for understanding of Li enhancement origin in RGB stars.
  • In this work, we present a catalog of 2651 carbon stars from the fourth Data Release (DR4) of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopy Telescope (LAMOST). Using an efficient machine-learning algorithm, we find out these stars from more than seven million spectra. As a by-product, 17 carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) turnoff star candidates are also reported in this paper, and they are preliminarily identified by their atmospheric parameters. Except for 176 stars that could not be given spectral types, we classify the other 2475 carbon stars into five subtypes including 864 C-H, 226 C-R, 400 C-J, 266 C-N, and 719 barium stars based on a series of spectral features. Furthermore, we divide the C-J stars into three subtypes of CJ( H), C-J(R), C-J(N), and about 90% of them are cool N-type stars as expected from previous literature. Beside spectroscopic classification, we also match these carbon stars to multiple broadband photometries. Using ultraviolet photometry data, we find that 25 carbon stars have FUV detections and they are likely to be in binary systems with compact white dwarf companions.
  • We determined the \fodd\ values, $0.46\pm0.08$, $0.51\pm0.09$, $0.50\pm0.13$, $0.48\pm0.12$, which correspond to the r-contribution 100\% for four r-II stars, \cs, \hen, \hes\, and \het, respectively. Our results suggest that almost all of the heavy elements (in the range from Ba to Pb) in r-II stars have a common origin, that is, from a single r-process (the main r-process). We found that the \fodd\ has a intrinsic nature, and should keep constant value of about 0.46 in the main r-process yields, which is responsible for the heavy element enhancement of r-II stars and of our Galaxy chemical enhancement. In addition, except the abundance ratio [Ba/Eu] the \fodd\ is also an important indicator, which can be used to study the relative contributions of the r- and s-process during the chemical evolution history of the Milky Way and the enhancement mechanism in stars with peculiar abundance of heavy elements.
  • We use the LAMOST spectra of member stars in Pleiades, M34, Praesepe, and Hyades to study how chromospheric activity vary as a function of mass and rotation at different age. We measured excess equivalent widths of H$\alpha$, H$\beta$, and Ca~{\sc ii} K based on estimated chromospheric contributions from old and inactive field dwarfs, and excess luminosities are obtained by normalizing bolometric luminosity, for more than 700 late-type stars in these open clusters. Results indicate two activity sequences in cool spot coverage and H$\alpha$ excess emission among GK dwarfs in Pleiades and M dwarfs in Praesepe and Hyades, paralleling with well known rotation sequences. A weak dependence of chromospheric emission on rotation exists among ultra fast rotators in saturated regime with Rossby number Ro$\lesssim0.1$. In the unsaturated regime, chromospheric and coronal emission show similar dependence on Ro, but with a shift toward larger Ro, indicating chromospheric emission gets easily saturated than coronal emission, and/or convective turnover time-scales based on X-ray data do not work well with chromospheric emission. More interestingly, our analysis show fully convective slow rotators obey the rotation-chromospheric activity relation similar to hotter stars, confirming the previous finding. We found correlations among H$\alpha$, H$\beta$, and Ca~{\sc ii} K emissions, in which H$\alpha$ losses are more important than Ca~{\sc ii} K for cooler and more active stars. In addition, a weak correlation is seen between chromospheric emission and photospheric activity that shows dependency on stellar spectral type and activity level, which provides some clues on how spot configuration vary as a function of mass and activity level.
  • Li abundances in the bulk of low-mass metal-poor stars are well reproduced by stellar evolution models adopting a constant initial abundance. However, a small number of stars have exceptionally high Li abundances, for which no convincing models have been established. We report on the discovery of 12 very metal-poor stars that have large excesses of Li, including an object having more than 100 times higher Li abundance than the values found in usual objects, which is the the largest excess in metal-poor stars known to date. The sample is distributed over a wide range of evolutionary stages, including five unevolved stars, showing no abundance anomaly in other elements. The results indicate the existence of an efficient process to enrich Li in a small fraction of low-mass stars at the main-sequence or subgiant phase. The wide distribution of Li-rich stars along the red giant branch could be explained by dilution of surface Li by mixing that occurs when the stars evolve into red giants. Our study narrows down the problem to be solved to understand the origins of Li-excess found in low-mass stars, suggesting the presence of unknown process that affects the surface abundances preceding red giant phases.
  • We have cross-matched the LAMOST DR3 with the Gaia DR1 TGAS catalogs and obtained a sample of 166,827 stars with reliable kinematics. A technique based on the wavelet transform was applied to detect significant overdensities in velocity space among five subsamples divided by spatial position. In total, 16 significant overdensities of stars with very similar kinematics were identified. Among these, four are new stream candidates and the rest are previously known groups. Both the U-V velocity and metallicity distributions of the local sample show a clear gap between the Hercules structure and the Hyades-Pleiades structure. The U-V positions of these peaks shift with the spatial position. Following a description of our analysis, we speculate on possible origins of our stream candidates.
  • Optical cavities provide high sensitivity to dispersion since their resonance frequencies depend on the index of refraction. We present a direct, broadband, and accurate measurement of the modes of a high finesse cavity using an optical frequency comb and a mechanical Fourier transform spectrometer with a kHz-level resolution. We characterize 16000 cavity modes spanning 16 THz of bandwidth in terms of center frequency, linewidth, and amplitude. We retrieve the group delay dispersion of the cavity mirror coatings and pure N${_2}$ with 0.1 fs${^2}$ precision and 1 fs${^2}$ accuracy, as well as the refractivity of the 3{\nu}1+{\nu}3 absorption band of CO${_2}$ with 5 x 10${^{-12}}$ precision. This opens up for broadband refractive index metrology and calibration-free spectroscopy of entire molecular bands.
  • Chemical abundances of eight O- and B-type stars are determined from high-resolution spectra obtained with the MIKE instrument on the Magellan 6.5m Clay telescope. The sample is selected from 42 candidates of membership in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System. Stellar parameters are measured by two independent grids of model atmospheres and analysis procedures, confirming the consistency of the stellar parameter results. Abundances of seven elements (He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, and S) are determined for the stars, as are their radial velocities and estimates of distances and ages. Among the seven B-type stars analyzed, the five that have radial velocities compatible with membership to the LA have an average [Mg/H] of $-0.42\pm0.16$, significantly lower than the average of the remaining two [Mg/H] = $-0.07\pm0.06$ that are kinematical members of the Galactic disk. Among the five LA members, four have individual [Mg/H] abundance compatible with that in the LMC. Within errors, we can not exclude the possibility that one of these stars has a [Mg/H] consistent with the more metal-poor, SMC-like material. The remaining fifth star has a [Mg/H] close to MW values. Distances to the LA members indicate that they are at the edge of the Galactic disk, while ages are of the order of $\sim 50-70$ Myr, lower than the dynamical age of the LA, suggesting a single star-forming episode in the LA. V$_{\rm LSR}$ the LA members decreases with decreasing Magellanic longitude, confirming the results of previous LA gas studies.
  • Nuclear fusion reactions are the most important processes in nature to power stars and produce new elements, and lie at the center of the understanding of nucleosynthesis in the universe. It is critically important to study the reactions in full plasma environments that are close to true astrophysical conditions. By using laser-driven counter-streaming collisionless plasmas, we studied the fusion D$+$D$\rightarrow n +^3$He in a Gamow-like window around 27 keV. The results show that astrophysical nuclear reaction yield can be modulated significantly by the self-generated electromagnetic fields and the collective motion of the plasma. This plasma-version mini-collider may provide a novel tool for studies of astrophysics-interested nuclear reactions in plasma with tunable energies in earth-based laboratories.
  • Employing tidally enhanced stellar wind, we studied in binaries the effects of metallicity, mass ratio of primary to secondary, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance on the formation of blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs). A total of 28 sets of binary models combined with different input parameters are studied. For each set of binary model, we presented a range of initial orbital periods that is needed to produce BHk stars in binaries. All the binary models could produce BHk stars within different range of initial orbital periods. We also compared our results with the observation in the Teff-logg diagram of GC NGC 2808 and {\omega} Cen. Most of the BHk stars in these two GCs locate well in the region predicted by our theoretical models, especially when C/N-enhanced model atmospheres are considered. We found that mass ratio of primary to secondary and tidal enhancement efficiency have little effects on the formation of BHk stars in binaries, while metallicity and helium abundance would play important roles, especially for helium abundance. Specifically, with helium abundance increasing in binary models, the space range of initial orbital periods needed to produce BHk stars becomes obviously wider, regardless of other input parameters adopted. Our results were discussed with recent observations and other theoretical models.
  • We use the spectra of Pleiades and field stars from LAMOST DR2 archive to study how spottedness and activity vary as a function of mass at young ages. We obtained standard TiO band strength by measuring TiO bands near 7050 $\AA$ from LAMOST spectra (R$\approx$1800) for large sample of field GKM dwarfs with solar metallicity. Analysis show that active dwarfs, including late G- and early K-type, have extra TiO absorption compare to inactive counterparts, indicating the presence of cool spots on their surface. Active late K- and M-dwarfs show deeper TiO2 and shallower TiO4 compare to inactive stars at a given TiO5, which could be partly explained through cool spots. We estimated cool spot fractional coverage for 304 Pleiades candidates by modelling their TiO2 (&TiO5) band strength with respect to standard value. Results show that surface of large fraction of K- and M-type members have very large spot coverage ($\sim$50%). We analysed a correlation between spot coverage, rotation and the amplitude of light variation, and found spot coverage on slow rotators ($R_{o}$ > 0.1) increases with decreasing Rossby Number $R_{o}$. Interestingly, we detected a saturation-like feature for spot coverage in fast rotators with a saturation level of 40%-50%. In addition, spot distribution in hotter fast rotators show more symmetrical compare to slow rotators. More interestingly, we detected large spot coverage in many M type members with no or little light variation. In bigger picture, these results provide important constraints for stellar dynamo on these cool active stars.
  • We report the first measurement of the odd-isotope fractions for barium, \fodd\, in two extremely metal-poor stars: a CEMP-r/s star \he\ (\feh\,$=-2.42\pm0.11$) and an r-II star \cs\ (\feh\,$=-2.90\pm0.13$). The measured \fodd\ values are $0.23\pm0.12$ corresponding to $34.3\pm34.3$\% of the r-process contributions for \he\ and $0.43\pm0.09$ corresponding to $91.4\pm25.7$\% of the r-process contribution to Ba production for \cs. The high r-process signature of barium in \cs\ ($91.4\pm25.7\%$) suggests that the majority of the heavy elements in this star were synthesised via an r-process path, while the lower r-process value ($34.3\pm34.3\%$) found in \he\ indicates that the heavy elements in this star formed through a mix of s-process and r-process synthesis. These conclusions are consistent with studies based on AGB model calculations to fit their abundance distributions.
  • In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. Combining the CN bands in the red end with \ctwo\ and other lines, we are able to identify the carbon stars. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of \ch, \CR, and \cn. These sub-types approximately show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future we can use them to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic datasets. Meanwhile, from the line indices space, while the \cn\ stars are clearly separated from the others, we find no clear separation between \CR\ and \ch\ sub-types. The \CR\ and \ch\ stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the \CR\ and \ch\ stars may not be different in their origins but look different in their spectra because of different metallicity. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C is not measured and thus the \cj\ stars are not identified.
  • Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to precisely determine the evolutionary status and fundamental properties of stars. With the unprecedented precision and nearly continuous photometric data acquired by the NASA Kepler mission, parameters of more than 10$^4$ stars have been determined nearly consistently. However, most studies still use photometric effective temperatures (Teff) and metallicities ([Fe/H]) as inputs, which are not sufficiently accurate as suggested by previous studies. We adopted the spectroscopic Teff and [Fe/H] values based on the LAMOST low-resolution spectra (R~1,800), and combined them with the global oscillation parameters to derive the physical parameters of a large sample of stars. Clear trends were found between {\Delta}logg(LAMOST - seismic) and spectroscopic Teff as well as logg, which may result in an overestimation of up to 0.5 dex for the logg of giants in the LAMOST catalog. We established empirical calibration relations for the logg values of dwarfs and giants. These results can be used for determining the precise distances to these stars based on their spectroscopic parameters.
  • We study a self-seeded high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL) scheme to extend the wavelength of a soft X-ray FEL. This scheme uses a regular self-seeding monochromator to generate a seed laser at the wavelength of 1.52 nm, followed by a HGHG configuration to produce coherent, narrow-bandwidth harmonic radiations at the GW level. The 2nd and 3rd harmonic radiation are investigated with start-to-end simulations. Detailed studies on the FEL performance and shot-to-shot fluctuations are presented.
  • We investigate the feasibility of the Si I infrared (IR) lines as Si abundance indicators for giant stars. We find that Si abundances obtained from the Si I IR lines based on the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis show large line-to-line scatter (mean value of 0.13dex), and are higher than those from the optical lines. However, when the non-LTE effects are taken into account, the line-to-line scatter reduces significantly (mean value of 0.06dex), and the Si abundances are consistent with those from the optical lines. The typical average non-LTE correction of [Si/Fe] for our sample stars is about $-$0.35dex. Our results demonstrate that the Si I IR lines could be reliable abundance indicators provided that the non-LTE effects are properly taken into account.
  • We report the detection of a double planetary system around the evolved intermediate-mass star HD 47366 from precise radial-velocity measurements at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, Xinglong Station, and Australian Astronomical Observatory. The star is a K1 giant with a mass of 1.81+-0.13M_sun, a radius of 7.30+-0.33R_sun, and solar metallicity. The planetary system is composed of two giant planets with minimum mass of 1.75^{+0.20}_{-0.17}Mjup and 1.86^{+0.16}_{-0.15}Mjup, orbital period of 363.3^{+2.5}_{-2.4} d and 684.7^{+5.0}_{-4.9} d, and eccentricity of 0.089^{+0.079}_{-0.060} and 0.278^{+0.067}_{-0.094}, respectively, which are derived by a double Keplerian orbital fit to the radial-velocity data. The system adds to the population of multi-giant-planet systems with relatively small orbital separations, which are preferentially found around evolved intermediate-mass stars. Dynamical stability analysis for the system revealed, however, that the best-fit orbits are unstable in the case of a prograde configuration. The system could be stable if the planets were in 2:1 mean-motion resonance, but this is less likely considering the observed period ratio and eccentricity. A present possible scenario for the system is that both of the planets have nearly circular orbits, namely the eccentricity of the outer planet is less than ~0.15, which is just within 1.4sigma of the best-fit value, or the planets are in a mutually retrograde configuration with a mutual orbital inclination larger than 160 degree.
  • This report summarizes laboratory measurements of atomic wavelengths, energy levels, hyperfine and isotope structure, energy level lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Theoretical calculations of lifetimes and oscillator strengths are also included. The bibliography is limited to species of astrophysical interest. Compilations of atomic data and internet databases are also included. Papers are listed in the bibliography in alphabetical order, with a reference number in the text. Comprehensive lists of references for atomic spectra can be found in the NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases http://physics.nist.gov/asbib.
  • We report on the observations of two ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars with [Fe/H]~-4.0 including one new discovery. The two stars are studied in the on-going and quite efficient project to search for extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars with LAMOST and Subaru. Detailed abundances or upper limits of abundances have been derived for 15 elements from Li to Eu based on high-resolution spectra obtained with Subaru/HDS. The abundance patterns of both UMP stars are consistent with the "normal-population" among the low-metallicity stars. Both of the two program stars show carbon-enhancement without any excess of heavy neutron-capture elements, indicating that they belong to the subclass of CEMP-no stars, as is the case of most UMP stars previously studied. The [Sr/Ba] ratios of both CEMP-no UMP stars are above [Sr/Ba]~-0.4, suggesting the origin of the carbon-excess is not compatible with the mass transfer from an AGB companion where the s-process has operated. Lithium abundance is measured in the newly discovered UMP star LAMOST J125346.09+075343.1, making it the second UMP turnoff star with Li detection. The Li abundance of LAMOST J125346.09+075343.1 is slightly lower than the values obtained for less metal-poor stars with similar temperature, and provides a unique data point at [Fe/H]~-4.2 to support the "meltdown" of the Li Spite-plateau at extremely low metallicity. Comparison with the other two UMP and HMP (hyper metal-poor with [Fe/H]<-5.0) turnoff stars suggests that the difference in lighter elements such as CNO and Na might cause notable difference in lithium abundances among CEMP-no stars.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely metal-poor (EMP) giant, LAMOST J110901.22+075441.8, which exhibits large excess of r-process elements with [Eu/Fe] ~ +1.16. The star is one of the newly discovered EMP stars identified from LAMOST low-resolution spectroscopic survey and the high-resolution follow-up observation with the Subaru Telescope. Stellar parameters and elemental abundances have been determined from the Subaru spectrum. Accurate abundances for a total of 23 elements including 11 neutron-capture elements from Sr through Dy have been derived for LAMOST J110901.22+075441.8. The abundance pattern of LAMOST J110901.22+075441.8 in the range of C through Zn is in line with the "normal" population of EMP halo stars, except that it shows a notable underabundance in carbon. The heavy element abundance pattern of LAMOST J110901.22+075441.8 is in agreement with other well studied cool r-II metal-poor giants such as CS 22892-052 and CS 31082-001. The abundances of elements in the range from Ba through Dy well match the scaled Solar r-process pattern. LAMOST J110901.22+075441.8 provides the first detailed measurements of neutron-capture elements among r-II stars at such low metallicity with [Fe/H]<-3.4, and exhibits similar behavior in the abundance ratio of Zr/Eu as well as Sr/Eu and Ba/Eu as other r-II stars.
  • Due to stellar rotation, the observed radial velocity of a star varies during the transit of a planet across its surface, a phenomenon known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. The amplitude of the RM effect is related to the radius of the planet which, because of differential absorption in the planetary atmosphere, depends on wavelength. Therefore, the wavelength-dependent RM effect can be used to probe the planetary atmosphere. We measure for the first time the RM effect of the Earth transiting the Sun using a lunar eclipse observed with the ESO HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the observed RM effect at different wavelengths to obtain the transmission spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere after the correction of the solar limb-darkening and the convective blueshift. The ozone Chappuis band absorption as well as the Rayleigh scattering features are clearly detectable with this technique. Our observation demonstrates that the RM effect can be an effective technique for exoplanet atmosphere characterization. Its particular asset is that photometric reference stars are not required, circumventing the principal challenge for transmission spectroscopy studies of exoplanet atmospheres using large ground-based telescopes.
  • Hyper-velocity stars are believed to be ejected out from the Galactic center through dynamical interactions between (binary) stars and the central massive black hole(s). In this paper, we report 19 low mass F/G/K type hyper-velocity star candidates from over one mil- lion stars of the first data release of the LAMOST general survey. We determine the unbound probability for each candidate using a Monte-Carlo simulation by assuming a non-Gaussian proper-motion error distribution, Gaussian heliocentric distance and radial velocity error dis- tributions. The simulation results show that all the candidates have unbound possibilities over 50% as expected, and one of them may even exceed escape velocity with over 90% probabili- ty. In addition, we compare the metallicities of our candidates with the metallicity distribution functions of the Galactic bulge, disk, halo and globular cluster, and conclude that the Galactic bulge or disk is likely the birth place for our candidates.
  • Palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) are the key elements for probing the weak component in the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) of stellar nucleosynthesis. We performed a detailed analysis of the high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio near-UV spectra from the archive of HIRES on the Keck telescope, UVES on the VLT, and HDS on the Subaru Telescope, to determine the Pd and Ag abundances of 95 stars. This sample covers a wide metallicity range with -2.6 $\lesssim$ [Fe/H] $\lesssim$ +0.1, and most of them are dwarfs. The plane-parallel LTE MAFAGS-OS model atmosphere was adopted, and the spectral synthesis method was used to derive the Pd and Ag abundances from Pd I {\lambda} 3404 {\AA} and Ag I {\lambda} 3280/3382 {\AA} lines. We found that both elements are enhanced in metal-poor stars, and their ratios to iron show flat trends at -0.6 < [Fe/H] < +0.1. The abundance ratios of [Ag/H] and [Pd/H] are well correlated over the whole abundance range. This implies that Pd and Ag have similar formation mechanisms during the Galactic evolution.