• We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet \UZ\ ("DeeDee"), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 AU. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an $r$-band magnitude of 23.0 in data collected by the Dark Energy Survey between 2014 and 2016. Its 1140-year orbit has $(a,e,i) = (109~\mathrm{AU}, 0.65, 26.8^{\circ})$. It will reach its perihelion distance of 38 AU in the year 2142. Integrations of its orbit show it to be dynamically stable on Gyr timescales, with only weak interactions with Neptune. We have performed followup observations with ALMA, using 3 hours of on-source integration time to measure the object's thermal emission in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail. The signal is detected at 7$\sigma$ significance, from which we determine a $V$-band albedo of $13.1^{+3.3}_{-2.4}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+2.0}_{-1.4}\mathrm{(sys)}$ percent and a diameter of $635^{+57}_{-61}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+32}_{-39}\mathrm{(sys)}$~km, assuming a spherical body with uniform surface properties.
  • We derive a free-form mass distribution for the unrelaxed cluster A370 (z=0.375), using the latest Hubble Frontier Fields images and GLASS spectroscopy. Starting from a reliable set of 10 multiply lensed systems we produce a free-form lens model that identifies ~ 80 multiple-images. Good consistency is found between models using independent subsamples of these lensed systems, with detailed agreement for the well resolved arcs. The mass distribution has two very similar concentrations centred on the two prominent Brightest Cluster Galaxies (or BCGs), with mass profiles that are accurately constrained by a uniquely useful system of long radially lensed images centred on both BCGs. We show that the lensing mass profiles of these BCGs are mainly accounted for by their stellar mass profiles, with a modest contribution from dark matter within r<100 kpc of each BCG. This conclusion may favour a cooled cluster gas origin for BCGs, rather than via mergers of normal galaxies for which dark matter should dominate over stars. Growth via merging between BCGs is, however, consistent with this finding, so that stars still dominate over dark matter .
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • Telescope Point Spread Function (PSF) quality is critical for realising the potential of cosmic weak lensing observations to constrain dark energy and test General Relativity. In this paper we use quantitative weak gravitational lensing measures to inform the precision of lens optical alignment, with specific reference to the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We compute optics spot diagrams and calculate the shear and flexion of the PSF as a function of position on the focal plane. For perfect optical alignment we verify the high quality of the DES optical design, finding a maximum PSF contribution to the weak lensing shear of 0.04 near the edge of the focal plane. However this can be increased by a factor of approximately three if the lenses are only just aligned within their maximum specified tolerances. We calculate the E and B-mode shear and flexion variance as a function of de-centre or tilt of each lens in turn. We find tilt accuracy to be a few times more important than de-centre, depending on the lens considered. Finally we consider the compound effect of de-centre and tilt of multiple lenses simultaneously, by sampling from a plausible range of values of each parameter. We find that the compound effect can be around twice as detrimental as when considering any one lens alone. Furthermore, this combined effect changes the conclusions about which lens is most important to align accurately. For DES, the tilt of the first two lenses is the most important.
  • Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the same sky area. For sky coverage f_sky=0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per \Delta z=0.1 bin at z<1 when \sim10 galaxies per square arcmin are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M>M_min=10^13 h^{-1}M_solar have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter \gamma (f=\Omega_m^{\gamma}), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy \sigma(\gamma)\sim 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \sigma(\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3 times (10 times) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 10^13.5 (10^14) h^{-1} M_solar. We also find that the \sigma(\gamma) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 10^13 - 10^14 h^{-1} M_solar, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. The gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by >0.5%.
  • GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) is a public image analysis challenge aimed at the development of algorithms to analyze astronomical images. Specifically, the challenge is to measure varying image distortions in the presence of a variable convolution kernel, pixelization and noise. This is the second in a series of challenges set to the astronomy, computer science and statistics communities, providing a structured environment in which methods can be improved and tested in preparation for planned astronomical surveys. GREAT10 extends upon previous work by introducing variable fields into the challenge. The "Galaxy Challenge" involves the precise measurement of galaxy shape distortions, quantified locally by two parameters called shear, in the presence of a known convolution kernel. Crucially, the convolution kernel and the simulated gravitational lensing shape distortion both now vary as a function of position within the images, as is the case for real data. In addition, we introduce the "Star Challenge" that concerns the reconstruction of a variable convolution kernel, similar to that in a typical astronomical observation. This document details the GREAT10 Challenge for potential participants. Continually updated information is also available from http://www.greatchallenges.info.
  • We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter halos that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses being used in the estimator. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15 times noisier than the optimal. Implementation of the optimal weight yields significantly lower stochasticity than weighting halos by their mass, bias or equal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost-effective. A volume-limited measurement of the mass power spectrum at k=0.2h/Mpc over the entire z<1 universe could ideally be done using only 6 million redshifts of halos with mass M>6\times10^{13}h^{-1}M_\odot (1\times10^{13}) at z=0 (z=1); this is 5 times fewer than the Poisson model predicts. Using halo occupancy distributions (HOD) we find that uniformly-weighted catalogs of luminous red galaxies require >3 times more redshifts than an optimally-weighted halo catalog to reconstruct the mass to the same accuracy. While the mean HODs of galaxies above a threshold luminosity are similar to the optimal w(M), the stochasticity of the halo occupation degrades the mass estimator. Blue or emission-line galaxies are about 100 times less efficient at reconstructing mass than an optimal weighting scheme. This suggests an efficient observational approach of identifying and weighting halos with a deep photo-z survey before conducting a spectroscopic survey. The optimal w(M) and mass-estimator stochasticity predicted by the standard halo model for M>10^{12}h^{-1}M_\odot are in reasonable agreement with our measurements, with the important exceptions that the halos must be assumed to be linearly biased samples of a "halo field" that is distinct from the mass field. (Abridged)
  • Proposed cosmological surveys will make use of photometric redshifts of galaxies that are significantly fainter than any complete spectroscopic redshift surveys that exist to train the photo-z methods. We investigate the photo-z biases that result from known differences between the faint and bright populations: a rise in AGN activity toward higher redshift, and a metallicity difference between intrinsically luminous and faint early-type galaxies. We find that even very small mismatches between the mean photometric target and the training set can induce photo-z biases large enough to corrupt derived cosmological parameters significantly. A metallicity shift of ~0.003dex in an old population, or contamination of any galaxy spectrum with ~0.2% AGN flux, is sufficient to induce a 10^-3 bias in photo-z. These results highlight the danger in extrapolating the behavior of bright galaxies to a fainter population, and the desirability of a spectroscopic training set that spans all of the characteristics of the photo-z targets, i.e. extending to the 25th mag or fainter galaxies that will be used in future surveys.
  • We present the results of the GREAT08 Challenge, a blind analysis challenge to infer weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from images. The primary goal was to stimulate new ideas by presenting the problem to researchers outside the shear measurement community. Six GREAT08 Team methods were presented at the launch of the Challenge and five additional groups submitted results during the 6 month competition. Participants analyzed 30 million simulated galaxies with a range in signal to noise ratio, point-spread function ellipticity, galaxy size, and galaxy type. The large quantity of simulations allowed shear measurement methods to be assessed at a level of accuracy suitable for currently planned future cosmic shear observations for the first time. Different methods perform well in different parts of simulation parameter space and come close to the target level of accuracy in several of these. A number of fresh ideas have emerged as a result of the Challenge including a re-examination of the process of combining information from different galaxies, which reduces the dependence on realistic galaxy modelling. The image simulations will become increasingly sophisticated in future GREAT challenges, meanwhile the GREAT08 simulations remain as a benchmark for additional developments in shear measurement algorithms.
  • The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.
  • We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~10^6 we find that using only the photometric redshifts with z<=2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the z_s-z_p distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. The cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.
  • These are the findings of the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) Figure of Merit (FoM) Science Working Group (SWG), the FoMSWG. JDEM is a space mission planned by NASA and the DOE for launch in the 2016 time frame. The primary mission is to explore the nature of dark energy. In planning such a mission, it is necessary to have some idea of knowledge of dark energy in 2016, and a way to quantify the performance of the mission. In this paper we discuss these issues.
  • Accurate knowledge of the telescope's point spread function (PSF) is essential for the weak gravitational lensing measurements that hold great promise for cosmological constraints. For space telescopes, the PSF may vary with time due to thermal drifts in the telescope structure, and/or due to jitter in the spacecraft pointing (ground-based telescopes have additional sources of variation). We describe and simulate a procedure for using the images of the stars in each exposure to determine the misalignment and jitter parameters, and reconstruct the PSF at any point in that exposure's field of view. The simulation uses the design of the SNAP (http://snap.lbl.gov) telescope. Stellar-image data in a typical exposure determines secondary-mirror positions as precisely as $20 {\rm nm}$. The PSF ellipticities and size, which are the quantities of interest for weak lensing are determined to $4.0 \times 10^{-4}$ and $2.2 \times 10^{-4}$ accuracies respectively in each exposure, sufficient to meet weak-lensing requirements. We show that, for the case of a space telescope, the PSF estimation errors scale inversely with the square root of the total number of photons collected from all the usable stars in the exposure.
  • Weak gravitational lensing surveys using photometric redshifts can have their cosmological constraints severely degraded by errors in the photo-z scale. We explore the cosmological degradation vs the size of the spectroscopic survey required to calibrate the photo-z probability distribution. Previous work has assumed a simple Gaussian distribution of photo-z errors; here we describe a method for constraining an arbitrary parametric photo-z error model. As an example we allow the photo-z probability distribution to be the sum of $N_g$ Gaussians. To limit cosmological degradation to a fixed level, photo-z models with multiple Gaussians require up to 5 times larger calibration sample than one would estimate from assuming a single-Gaussian model. This degradation saturates at $N_g\approx 4$. Assuming a single Gaussian when the photo-z distribution has multiple parameters underestimates cosmological parameter uncertainties by up to 35%. The size of required calibration sample also depends upon the shape of the fiducial distribution, even when the RMS photo-z error is held fixed. The required calibration sample size varies up to a factor of 40 among the fiducial models studied, but this is reduced to a factor of a few if the photo-z parameters are forced to be slowly varying with redshift. Finally we show that the size of the required calibration sample can be substantially reduced by optimizing its redshift distribution. We hope this study will help stimulate work on better understanding of photo-z errors.
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate ways to optimize the accuracy of photometric redshifts for a SNAP like mission. We focus on how the accuracy of the photometric redshifts depends on the magnitude limit and signal-to-noise ratio, wave-length coverage, number of filters and their shapes and observed galaxy type. We use simulated galaxy catalogs constructed to reproduce observed galaxy luminosity functions from GOODS, and derive photometric redshifts using a template fitting method. By using a catalog that resembles real data, we can estimate the expected number density of galaxies for which photometric redshifts can be derived. We find that the accuracy of photometric redshifts is strongly dependent on the signal-to-noise (S/N) (i.e., S/N>10 is needed for accurate photometric redshifts). The accuracy of the photometric redshifts is also dependent on galaxy type, with smaller scatter for earlier type galaxies. Comparing results using different filter sets, we find that including the U-band is important for decreasing the fraction of outliers, i.e., ``catastrophic failures''. Using broad overlapping filters with resolution ~4gives better photometric redshifts compared to narrower filters (resolution >~5) with the same integration time. We find that filters with square response curves result in a slightly higher scatter, mainly due to a higher fraction of outliers at faint magnitudes. We also compare a 9-filter set to a 17-filter set, where we assume that the available exposure time per filter in the latter set is half that of the first set. We find that the 9-filter set gives more accurate redshifts for a larger number of objects and reaches higher redshift, while the 17-filter set is gives better results at bright magnitudes.
  • We investigate the value of future dark energy experiments by modeling their ability to constrain the dark energy equation of state. Similar work was recently reported by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) using a two dimensional parameterization of the equation of state evolution. We examine constraints in a nine dimensional dark-energy parameterization, and find that the best experiments constrain significantly more than two dimensions in our 9D space. Consequently the impact of these experiments is substantially beyond that revealed in the DETF analysis, and the estimated cost per ``impact'' drops by about a factor of ten as one moves to the very best experiments. The DETF conclusions about the relative value of different techniques and of the importance of combining techniques are unchanged by our analysis.
  • We investigate three potential sources of bias in distance estimations made assuming that a very simple estimator of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale provides a standard ruler. These are the effects of the non-linear evolution of structure, scale-dependent bias and errors in the survey window function estimation. The simple estimator used is the peak of the smoothed correlation function, which provides a variance in the BAO scale that is close to optimal, if appropriate low-pass filtering is applied to the density field. While maximum-likelihood estimators can eliminate biases if the form of the systematic error is fully modeled, we estimate the potential effects of un- or mis-modelled systematic errors. Non-linear structure growth using the Smith et al. (2003) prescription biases the acoustic scale by <0.3% at z>1 under the correlation-function estimator. The biases due to representative but simplistic models of scale-dependent galaxy bias are below 1% at z>1 for bias behaviour in the realms suggested by halo model calculations, which is expected to be below statistical errors for a 1000 sq.degs. spectroscopic survey. The distance bias due to a survey window function errors is given in a simple closed form and it is shown it has to be kept below 2% not to bias acoustic scale more than 1% at z=1, although the actual tolerance can be larger depending upon galaxy bias. These biases are comparable to statistical errors for ambitious surveys if no correction is made for them. We show that RMS photometric zero-point errors (at limiting magnitude 25 mag) below 0.14 mag and 0.01 mag for redshift z=1 (red galaxies) and z=3 (Lyman-break galaxies), respectively, are required in order to keep the distance estimator bias below 1%.
  • Dark energy appears to be the dominant component of the physical Universe, yet there is no persuasive theoretical explanation for its existence or magnitude. The acceleration of the Universe is, along with dark matter, the observed phenomenon that most directly demonstrates that our theories of fundamental particles and gravity are either incorrect or incomplete. Most experts believe that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics will be required to achieve a full understanding of the cosmic acceleration. For these reasons, the nature of dark energy ranks among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. These circumstances demand an ambitious observational program to determine the dark energy properties as well as possible.
  • The Shear TEsting Programme (STEP) is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of weak lensing measurement, in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. We review sixteen current and emerging shear measurement methods in a common language, and assess their performance by running them (blindly) on simulated images that contain a known shear signal. We determine the common features of algorithms that most successfully recover the input parameters. We achieve previously unattained discriminatory precision in our analysis, via a combination of more extensive simulations, and pairs of galaxy images that have been rotated with respect to each other, thus removing noise from their intrinsic ellipticities. The robustness of our simulation approach is also confirmed by testing the relative calibration of methods on real data. Weak lensing measurement has improved since the first STEP paper. Several methods now consistently achieve better than 2% precision, and are still being developed. However, the simulations can now distinguish all methods from perfect performance. Our main concern continues to be the potential for a multiplicative shear calibration bias: not least because this can not be internally calibrated with real data. We determine which galaxy populations are responsible and, by adjusting the simulated observing conditions, we also investigate the effects of instrumental and atmospheric parameters. We have isolated several previously unrecognised aspects of galaxy shape measurement, in which focussed development could provide further progress towards the sub-percent level of precision desired for future surveys. [ABRIDGED]
  • We implement the Elliptical Gauss-Laguerre (EGL) galaxy-shape measurement method proposed by Bernstein & Jarvis (2002) and quantify the shear recovery accuracy in weak lensing analysis. This method uses a deconvolution fitting scheme to remove the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). The test simulates >10^7 noisy galaxy images convolved with anisotropic PSFs, and attempts to recover an input shear. The tests are designed to be immune to shape noise, selection biases, and crowding. The systematic error in shear recovery is divided into two classes, calibration (multiplicative) and additive, with the latter arising from PSF anisotropy. At S/N > 50, the deconvolution method measures the galaxy shape and input shear to ~ 1% multiplicative accuracy, and suppresses > 99% of the PSF anisotropy. These systematic errors increase to ~ 4% for the worst conditions, with poorly resolved galaxies at S/N ~ 20. The EGL weak lensing analysis has the best demonstrated accuracy to date, sufficient for the next generation of weak lensing surveys.
  • We perform a cosmological parameter analysis of the 75 square degree CTIO lensing survey in conjunction with CMB and Type Ia supernovae data. For Lambda CDM cosmologies, we find that the amplitude of the power spectrum at low redshift is given by sigma_8 = 0.81 (+0.15,-0.10, 95% c.l.), where the error bar includes both statistical and systematic errors. The total of all systematic errors is smaller than the statistical errors, but they do make up a significant fraction of the error budget. We find that weak lensing improves the constraints on dark energy as well. The (constant) dark energy equation of state parameter, w, is measured to be -0.89 (+0.16,-0.21, 95% c.l.). Marginalizing over a constant $w$ slightly changes the estimate of sigma_8 to 0.79 (+0.17, -0.14, 95% c.l.). We also investigate variable w cosmologies, but find that the constraints weaken considerably; the next generation surveys are needed to obtain meaningful constraints on the possible time evolution of dark energy.
  • The Shear TEsting Programme, STEP, is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of all weak lensing measurements in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. In this first STEP paper we present the results of a blind analysis of simulated ground-based observations of relatively simple galaxy morphologies. The most successful methods are shown to achieve percent level accuracy. From the cosmic shear pipelines that have been used to constrain cosmology, we find weak lensing shear measured to an accuracy that is within the statistical errors of current weak lensing analyses, with shear measurements accurate to better than 7%. The dominant source of measurement error is shown to arise from calibration uncertainties where the measured shear is over or under-estimated by a constant multiplicative factor. This is of concern as calibration errors cannot be detected through standard diagnostic tests. The measured calibration errors appear to result from stellar contamination, false object detection, the shear measurement method itself, selection bias and/or the use of biased weights. Additive systematics (false detections of shear) resulting from residual point-spread function anisotropy are, in most cases, reduced to below an equivalent shear of 0.001, an order of magnitude below cosmic shear distortions on the scales probed by current surveys. Our results provide a snapshot view of the accuracy of current ground-based weak lensing methods and a benchmark upon which we can improve. To this end we provide descriptions of each method tested and include details of the eight different implementations of the commonly used Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (1995) method (KSB+) to aid the improvement of future KSB+ analyses.
  • Given the basic parameters of a cosmic shear weak lensing survey, how well can systematic errors due to anisotropy in the point spread function (PSF) be corrected? The largest source of error in this correction to date has been the interpolation of the PSF to the locations of the galaxies. To address this error, we separate the PSF patterns into components that recur in multiple exposures/pointings and those that vary randomly between different exposures (such as those due to the atmosphere). In an earlier study we developed a principal component approach to correct the recurring PSF patterns (Jarvis and Jain 2004). In this paper we show how randomly varying PSF patterns can also be circumvented in the measurement of shear correlations. For the two-point correlation function this is done by simply using pairs of galaxy shapes measured in different exposures. Combining the two techniques allows us to tackle generic combinations of PSF anisotropy patterns. The second goal of this paper is to give a formalism for quantifying residual systematic errors due to PSF patterns. We show how the main PSF corrections improve with increasing survey area (and thus can stay below the reduced statistical errors), and we identify the residual errors which do not scale with survey area. Our formalism can be applied both to planned lensing surveys to optimize instrumental and survey parameters and to actual lensing data to quantify residual errors.
  • We calculate the systematic errors in the weak gravitational lensing power spectrum which would be caused by spatially varying calibration (i.e. multiplicative) errors, such as might arise from uncorrected seeing or extinction variations. The systematic error is fully described by the angular two-point correlation function of the systematic in the case of the 2D lensing that we consider here. We investigate three specific cases: Gaussian, ``patchy'' and exponential correlation functions. In order to keep systematic errors below statistical errors in future LSST-like surveys, the spatial variation of calibration should not exceed 3% rms. This conclusion is independently true for all forms of correlation function we consider. The relative size the E- and B-mode power spectrum errors does, however, depend upon the form of the correlation function, indicating that one cannot repair the E-mode power spectrum systematics by means of the B-mode measurements.
  • We study the impact of systematic errors on planned weak lensing surveys and compute the requirements on their contributions so that they are not a dominant source of the cosmological parameter error budget. The generic types of error we consider are multiplicative and additive errors in measurements of shear, as well as photometric redshift errors. In general, more powerful surveys have stronger systematic requirements. For example, for a SNAP-type survey the multiplicative error in shear needs to be smaller than 1%(fsky/0.025)^{-1/2} of the mean shear in any given redshift bin, while the centroids of photometric redshift bins need to be known to better than 0.003(fsky/0.025)^{-1/2}. With about a factor of two degradation in cosmological parameter errors, future surveys can enter a self-calibration regime, where the mean systematic biases are self-consistently determined from the survey and only higher-order moments of the systematics contribute. Interestingly, once the power spectrum measurements are combined with the bispectrum, the self-calibration regime in the variation of the equation of state of dark energy w_a is attained with only a 20-30% error degradation.