• Low radio frequency surveys are important for testing unified models of radio-loud quasars and radio galaxies. Intrinsically similar sources that are randomly oriented on the sky will have different projected linear sizes. Measuring the projected linear sizes of these sources provides an indication of their orientation. Steep-spectrum isotropic radio emission allows for orientation-free sample selection at low radio frequencies. We use a new radio survey of the Bo\"otes field at 150 MHz made with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) to select a sample of radio sources. We identify 44 radio galaxies and 16 quasars with powers $P>10^{25.5}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ at 150 MHz using cross-matched multi-wavelength information from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), which provides spectroscopic redshifts. We find that LOFAR-detected radio sources with steep spectra have projected linear sizes that are on average 4.4$\pm$1.4 larger than those with flat spectra. The projected linear sizes of radio galaxies are on average 3.1$\pm$1.0 larger than those of quasars (2.0$\pm$0.3 after correcting for redshift evolution). Combining these results with three previous surveys, we find that the projected linear sizes of radio galaxies and quasars depend on redshift but not on power. The projected linear size ratio does not correlate with either parameter. The LOFAR data is consistent within the uncertainties with theoretical predictions of the correlation between the quasar fraction and linear size ratio, based on an orientation-based unification scheme.
  • The correlation between radio spectral index and redshift has been exploited to discover high redshift radio galaxies, but its underlying cause is unclear. It is crucial to characterise the particle acceleration and loss mechanisms in high redshift radio galaxies to understand why their radio spectral indices are steeper than their local counterparts. Low frequency information on scales of $\sim$1 arcsec are necessary to determine the internal spectral index variation. In this paper we present the first spatially resolved studies at frequencies below 100 MHz of the $z = 2.4$ radio galaxy 4C 43.15 which was selected based on its ultra-steep spectral index ($\alpha < -1$; $S_{\nu} \sim \nu^{\alpha}$ ) between 365 MHz and 1.4 GHz. Using the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band Antenna we achieve sub-arcsecond imaging resolution at 55 MHz with VLBI techniques. Our study reveals low-frequency radio emission extended along the jet axis, which connects the two lobes. The integrated spectral index for frequencies $<$ 500 MHz is -0.83. The lobes have integrated spectral indices of -1.31$\pm$0.03 and -1.75$\pm$0.01 for frequencies $\geq$1.4 GHz, implying a break frequency between 500 MHz and 1.4 GHz. These spectral properties are similar to those of local radio galaxies. We conclude that the initially measured ultra-steep spectral index is due to a combination of the steepening spectrum at high frequencies with a break at intermediate frequencies.
  • Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (<=500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with LOFAR in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 +- 9 km/s . Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-{\alpha} transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5 sigma detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 0.003 and FWHM of 31 km/s. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.
  • We present first results from electronic Multi-Element Remotely Linked Interferometer Network (e-MERLIN) and electronic European VLBI Network (e-EVN) observations of a small sample of ultra-steep spectrum radio sources, defined as those sources with a spectral index alpha < -1.4 between 74 MHz and 325 MHz, which are unresolved on arcsecond scales. Such sources are currently poorly understood and a number of theories as to their origin have been proposed in the literature. The new observations described here have resulted in the first detection of two of these sources at milliarcsecond scales and show that a significant fraction of ultra-steep spectrum sources may have compact structures which can only be studied at the high resolution available with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI).
  • Taking advantage of the impressive sensitivity of Spitzer to detect massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the mid-infrared environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies at 1.2<z<3. Galaxy cluster member candidates were isolated using a single Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared color criterion, [3.6]-[4.5]>-0.1 (AB), in the fields of 48 radio galaxies at 1.2<z<3. This simple IRAC color selection is effective at identifying galaxies at z>1.2. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, we identify a field as overdense when 15 or more red IRAC sources are found within 1arcmin (i.e.,~0.5Mpc at 1.2<z<3) of the radio galaxy to the 5sigma flux density limits of our IRAC data (f3.6=11.0uJy, f4.5=13.4uJy). We find that radio galaxies lie preferentially in medium to dense regions, with 73% of the targeted fields denser than average. Our (shallow) 120s data permit the rediscovery of previously known clusters and protoclusters associated with radio galaxies as well as the discovery of new promising galaxy cluster candidates at z>1.2.
  • At very low frequencies, the new pan-European radio telescope LOFAR is opening the last unexplored window of the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysical studies. The revolutionary APERTIF phased arrays that are about to be installed on the Westerbork radio telescope (WSRT) will dramatically increase the survey speed for the WSRT. Combined surveys with these two facilities will deeply chart the northern sky over almost two decades in radio frequency from \sim 15 up to 1400 MHz. Here we briefly describe some of the capabilities of these new facilities and what radio surveys are planned to study fundamental issues related the formation and evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. In the second part we briefly review some recent observational results directly showing that diffuse radio emission in clusters traces shocks due to cluster mergers. As these diffuse radio sources are relatively bright at low frequencies, LOFAR should be able to detect thousands of such sources up to the epoch of cluster formation. This will allow addressing many question about the origin and evolution of shocks and magnetic fields in clusters. At the end we briefly review some of the first and very preliminary LOFAR results on clusters.
  • We present a study of protoclusters associated with high redshift radio galaxies. We imaged MRC1017-220 (z=1.77) and MRC0156-252 (z=2.02) using the near-infrared wide-field (7.5'x7.5') imager VLT/HAWK-I in the Y, H and Ks bands. We present the first deep Y-band galaxy number counts within a large area (200 arcmin2). We then develop a purely near-infrared colour selection technique to isolate galaxies at 1.6<z<3 that may be associated with the two targets, dividing them into (i) red passively evolving or dusty star-forming galaxies or (ii) blue/star-formation dominated galaxies with little or no dust. Both targeted fields show an excess of star-forming galaxies with respect to control fields. No clear overdensity of red galaxies is detected in the surroundings of MRC1017-220 although the spatial distribution of the red galaxies resembles a filament-like structure within which the radio galaxy is embedded. In contrast, a significant overdensity of red galaxies is detected in the field of MRC0156-252, ranging from a factor of 2-3 times the field density at large scales (2.5Mpc, angular distance) up to a factor of 3-4 times the field density within a 1Mpc radius of the radio galaxy. Half of these red galaxies have colours consistent with red sequence models at z~2, with a large fraction being bright (Ks<21.5, i.e. massive). In addition, we also find a small group of galaxies within 5" of MRC0156-252 suggesting that the radio galaxy has multiple companions within ~50 kpc. We conclude that the field of MRC0156-252 shows many remarkable similarities with the well-studied protocluster surrounding PKS1138-262 (z=2.16) suggesting that MRC0156-252 is associated with a galaxy protocluster at z~2.
  • We present the second part of an H-band (1.6 microns) atlas of z<0.3 3CR radio galaxies, using the Hubble Space Telescope Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (HST NICMOS2). We present new imaging for 21 recently acquired sources, and host galaxy modeling for the full sample of 101 (including 11 archival) -- an 87% completion rate. Two different modeling techniques are applied, following those adopted by the galaxy morphology and the quasar host galaxy communities. Results are compared, and found to be in excellent agreement, although the former breaks down in the case of strongly nucleated sources. Companion sources are tabulated, and the presence of mergers, tidal features, dust disks and jets are catalogued. The tables form a catalogue for those interested in the structural and morphological dust-free host galaxy properties of the 3CR sample, and for comparison with morphological studies of quiescent galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Host galaxy masses are estimated, and found to typically lie at around 2*10^11 solar masses. In general, the population is found to be consistent with the local population of quiescent elliptical galaxies, but with a longer tail to low Sersic index, mainly consisting of low-redshift (z<0.1) and low-radio-power (FR I) sources. A few unusually disky FR II host galaxies are picked out for further discussion. Nearby external sources are identified in the majority of our images, many of which we argue are likely to be companion galaxies or merger remnants. The reduced NICMOS data are now publicly available from our website (http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/3cr/)
  • We review the properties and nature of luminous high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs, z > 2) and the environments in which they are located. HzRGs have several distinct constituents which interact with each other - relativistic plasma, gas in various forms, dust, stars and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). These building blocks provide unique diagnostics about conditions in the early Universe. We discuss the properties of each constituent. Evidence is presented that HzRGs are massive forming galaxies and the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies in the local Universe. HzRGs are located in overdense regions in the early Universe and are frequently surrounded by protoclusters. We review the properties and nature of these radio-selected protoclusters. Finally we consider the potential for future progress in the field during the next few decades. A compendium of known HzRGs is given in an appendix.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive Spitzer survey of 69 radio galaxies across 1<z<5.2. Using IRAC (3.6-8.0um), IRS (16um) and MIPS (24-160um) imaging, we decompose the rest-frame optical to infrared spectral energy distributions into stellar, AGN, and dust components and determine the contribution of host galaxy stellar emission at rest-frame H-band. Stellar masses derived from rest-frame near-IR data, where AGN and young star contributions are minimized, are significantly more reliable than those derived from rest-frame optical and UV data. We find that the fraction of emitted light at rest-frame H-band from stars is >60% for ~75% the high redshift radio galaxies. As expected from unified models of AGN, the stellar fraction of the rest-frame H-band luminosity has no correlation with redshift, radio luminosity, or rest-frame mid-IR (5um) luminosity. Additionally, while the stellar H-band luminosity does not vary with stellar fraction, the total H-band luminosity anti-correlates with the stellar fraction as would be expected if the underlying hosts of these radio galaxies comprise a homogeneous population. The resultant stellar luminosities imply stellar masses of 10^{11-11.5}Msun even at the highest redshifts. Powerful radio galaxies tend to lie in a similar region of mid-IR color-color space as unobscured AGN, despite the stellar contribution to their mid-IR SEDs at shorter-wavelengths. The mid-IR luminosities alone classify most HzRGs as LIRGs or ULIRGs with even higher total-IR luminosities. As expected, these exceptionally high mid-IR luminosities are consistent with an obscured, highly-accreting AGN. We find a weak correlation of stellar mass with radio luminosity.
  • We present the results of an optical and near-IR spectroscopic study of giant nebular emission line halos associated with three z > 3 radio galaxies, 4C 41.17, 4C 60.07 and B2 0902+34. Previous deep narrow band Ly-alpha imaging had revealed complex morphologies with sizes up to 100 kpc), possibly connected to outflows and AGN feedback from the central regions. The outer regions of these halos show quiet kinematics with typical velocity dispersions of a few hundred km/s, and velocity shears that can mostly be interpreted as being due to rotation. The inner regions show shocked cocoons of gas closely associated with the radio lobes. These display disturbed kinematics and have expansion velocities and/or velocity dispersions >1000 km/s. The core region is chemically evolved, and we also find spectroscopic evidence for the ejection of enriched material in 4C 41.17 up to a distance of approximately 60 kpc along the radio-axis. The dynamical structures traced in the Ly-alpha line are, in most cases, closely echoed in the Carbon and Oxygen lines. This shows that the Ly-alpha line is produced in a highly clumped medium of small filling factor, and can therefore be used as a tracer of the dynamics of high-z radio galaxies (HzRGs). We conclude that these HzRGs are undergoing a final jet-induced phase of star formation with ejection of most of their interstellar medium before becoming "red and dead" Elliptical galaxies.
  • We report the discovery of a new optical-IR synchrotron jet in the radio galaxy 3C133 from our HST/NICMOS snapshot survey. The jet and eastern hotspot are well resolved, and visible at both optical and IR wavelengths. The IR jet follows the morphology of the inner part of the radio jet, with three distinct knots identified with features in the radio. The radio-IR SED's of the knots are examined, along with those of two more distant hotspots at the eastern extreme of the radio feature. The detected emission appears to be synchrotron, with peaks in the NIR for all except one case, which exhibits a power-law spectrum throughout.
  • We report on first results of an ongoing effort to image a small sample of high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) with milliarcsecond (mas) resolution, using very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques. Here, we present 1.7 and 5.0 GHz VLBA observations of B3 J2330+3927, a radio galaxy at z=3.087. Those observations, combined with 8.4 GHz VLA-A observations, have helped us interpret the source radio morphology, and most of our results have already been published (Perez-Torres & De Breuck 2005). In particular, we pinpointed the core of the radio galaxy, and also detected both radio lobes, which have a very asymmetric flux density ratio, R>11. Contrary to what is seen in other radio galaxies, it is the radio lobe furthest from the nucleus which is the brighest. Almost all of the Ly-alpha emission is seen between the nucleus and the furthest radio lobe, which is also unlike all other radio galaxies. The values of radio lobe distance ratio, and flux density ratio, as well as the fraction of core emission make of B3 J2330+3927 an extremely asymmetric source, and challenges unification models that explain the differences between quasars and radio galaxies as due to orientation effects.
  • The clustering properties of clusters, galaxies and AGN as a function of redshift are briefly discussed. It appears that extremely red objects at z ~ 1, and objects with J-K > 1.7 and photometric redshifts 2 < z_phot < 4 are highly clustered, indicating that a majority of these objects constitutes the progenitors of nearby ellipticals. Similarly clustered seem luminous radio galaxies at z\sim 1, indicating that these objects comprise a short lived phase in the lifetime of these red objects. The high level of clustering furthermore suggests that distant powerful radio galaxies (e.g. z>2) might be residing in the progenitors of nearby clusters -- proto-clusters. A number of observational projects targetting fields with distant radio galaxies, including studies of Lya and Ha emitters, Lyman break galaxies and (sub)mm and X-ray emitters, all confirm that such radio galaxies are located in such proto-clusters. Estimates of the total mass of the proto-clusters are similar to the masses of local clusters. If the total star formation rate which we estimate for the entire proto-clusters is sustained up to z~1, the metals in the hot cluster gas of local clusters can easily be accounted for.
  • We have compiled a sample of 165 radio galaxies from the literature to study the properties of the extended emission line regions and their interaction with the radio source over a large range of redshift 0<z<5.2. For each source, we have collected radio (size, lobe distance ratio and power) and spectroscopic parameters (luminosity, line width and equivalent width) for the four brightest UV lines. We also introduce a parameter A_{Ly-alpha} measuring the asymmetry of the Ly-alpha line. Using these 18 parameters, we examine the statistical significance of all 153 mutual correlations, and find the following significant correlations: (i) Ly-alpha asymmetry A_{Ly-alpha} with radio size and redshift, (ii) line luminosity with radio power, (iii) line luminosities of UV lines with each other, and (iv) equivalent widths of UV lines with each other. Using line-ratio diagnostic diagrams, we examine the ionization mechanism of the extended emission line regions in HzRGs. The high ionization lines seem to confirm previous results showing that AGN photo-ionization provides the best fit to the data, but are inconsitent with the CII/CIII ratio, which favour the highest velocity shock ionization models. We note that the CII line is 5 times more sensitive to shock ionization than the high ionization UV lines, and show that a combination of shock and photo-ionization provides a better overall fit to the integrated spectra of HzRGs. Because most HzRGs have radio sizes <~150 kpc, their integrated spectra might well contain a significant contribution from shock ionized emission. [abridged]
  • This paper describes an investigation of the early evolution of extragalactic radio sources using samples of faint and bright Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies. Correlations found between their peak frequency, peak flux density and angular size provide strong evidence that synchrotron self absorption is the cause of the spectral turnovers, and indicate that young radio sources evolve in a self-similar way. In addition, the data seem to suggest that the sources are in equipartition while they evolve. If GPS sources evolve to large size radio sources, their redshift dependent birth-functions should be the same. Therefore, since the lifetimes of radio sources are thought to be short compared to the Hubble time, the observed difference in redshift distribution between GPS and large size sources must be due to a difference in slope of their luminosity functions. We argue that this slope is strongly affected by the luminosity evolution of the individual sources. A scenario for the luminosity evolution is proposed in which GPS sources increase in luminosity and large scale radio sources decrease in luminosity with time. This evolution scenario is expected for a ram-pressure confined radio source in a surrounding medium with a King profile density. In the inner parts of the King profile, the density of the medium is constant and the radio source builds up its luminosity, but after it grows large enough the density of th e surrounding medium declines and the luminosity of the radio source decreases. A comparison of the local luminosity function (LLF) of GPS galaxies with that of extended sources is a good test for this evolution scenario [abridged].
  • The optical structure of several AGN has been studied using the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The FGSs are interferometric devices which can resolve structure on scales of 20 milliarcsecs or less and hence have the potential to improve on the resolution attainable by HST's cameras. The FGSs produce interferometric fringes known as S-curves which are related to the intensity profile of the object on the sky. These have been analyzed using a simple model for the radial intensity distribution and strength of the underlying background illumination of the observed objects. Eight different observations of six different AGN have been analyzed. No statistically significant differences from point sources are detected but significant upper limits of order 20 milliarcseconds are placed on any spatial extent. Systematic effects limiting the resolution are discussed and some simple conclusions about the physical size and luminosity densities of the emitting regions of the AGN implied by the data are given.
  • Radio sources have traditionally provided convenient beacons for probing the early Universe. Hy Spinrad was among the first of the tenacious breed of observers who would attempt to obtain optical identifications and spectra of the faintest possible `radio galaxies' to investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies at hy redshift. Modern telescopes and instruments have made these tasks much simpler, although not easy, and here we summarize the current status of our hunts for hy redshift radio galaxies (HyZRGs) using radio spectral and near-IR selection.