• The assortment problem in revenue management is the problem of deciding which subset of products to offer to consumers in order to maximise revenue. A simple and natural strategy is to select the best assortment out of all those that are constructed by fixing a threshold revenue $\pi$ and then choosing all products with revenue at least $\pi$. This is known as the revenue-ordered assortments strategy. In this paper we study the approximation guarantees provided by revenue-ordered assortments when customers are rational in the following sense: the probability of selecting a specific product from the set being offered cannot increase if the set is enlarged. This rationality assumption, known as regularity, is satisfied by almost all discrete choice models considered in the revenue management and choice theory literature, and in particular by random utility models. The bounds we obtain are tight and improve on recent results in that direction, such as for the Mixed Multinomial Logit model by Rusmevichientong et al. (2014). An appealing feature of our analysis is its simplicity, as it relies only on the regularity condition. We also draw a connection between assortment optimisation and two pricing problems called unit demand envy-free pricing and Stackelberg minimum spanning tree: These problems can be restated as assortment problems under discrete choice models satisfying the regularity condition, and moreover revenue-ordered assortments correspond then to the well-studied uniform pricing heuristic. When specialised to that setting, the general bounds we establish for revenue-ordered assortments match and unify the best known results on uniform pricing.
  • We study the assortment optimization problem under the Sequential Multinomial Logit (SML), a discrete choice model that generalizes the multinomial logit (MNL). Under the SML model, products are partitioned into two levels, to capture differences in attractiveness, brand awareness and, or visibility of the products in the market. When a consumer is presented with an assortment of products, she first considers products in the first level and, if none of them is purchased, products in the second level are considered. This model is a special case of the Perception-Adjusted Luce Model (PALM) recently proposed by Echenique et al (2018). It can explain many behavioural phenomena such as the attraction, compromise, similarity effects and choice overload which cannot be explained by the MNL model or any discrete choice model based on random utility. In particular, the SML model allows violations to regularity which states that the probability of choosing a product cannot increase if the offer set is enlarged. This paper shows that the seminal concept of revenue-ordered assortment sets, which contain an optimal assortment under the MNL model, can be generalized to the SML model. More precisely, the paper proves that all optimal assortments under the SML are revenue-ordered by level, a natural generalization of revenue-ordered assortments that contains, at most, a quadratic number of assortments. As a corollary, assortment optimization under the SML is polynomial-time solvable. This result is particularly interesting given that the SML model does not satisfy the regularity condition and, therefore, it can explain choice behaviours that cannot be explained by any choice model based on random utility.
  • We study the dynamic pricing problem faced by a monopolistic retailer who sells a storable product to forward-looking consumers. In this framework, the two major pricing policies (or mechanisms) studied in the literature are the preannounced (commitment) pricing policy and the contingent (threat or history dependent) pricing policy. We analyse and compare these pricing policies in the setting where the good can be purchased along a finite time horizon in indivisible atomic quantities. First, we show that, given linear storage costs, the retailer can compute an optimal preannounced pricing policy in polynomial time by solving a dynamic program. Moreover, under such a policy, we show that consumers do not need to store units in order to anticipate price rises. Second, under the contingent pricing policy rather than the preannounced pricing mechanism, (i) prices could be lower, (ii) retailer revenues could be higher, and (iii) consumer surplus could be higher. This result is surprising, in that these three facts are in complete contrast to the case of a retailer selling divisible storable goods Dudine et al. (2006). Third, we quantify exactly how much more profitable a contingent policy could be with respect to a preannounced policy. Specifically, for a market with $N$ consumers, a contingent policy can produce a multiplicative factor of $\Omega(\log N)$ more revenues than a preannounced policy, and this bound is tight.
  • We propose a new discrete choice model that generalizes the random utility model (RUM). We show that this model, called the \emph{Generalized Stochastic Preference} (GSP) model can explain several choice phenomena that can't be represented by a RUM. In particular, the model can easily (and also exactly) replicate some well known examples that are not RUM, as well as controlled choice experiments carried out since 1980's that possess strong regularity violations. One such regularity violation is the \emph{decoy effect} in which the probability of choosing a product increases when a similar, but inferior product is added to the choice set. An appealing feature of the GSP is that it is non-parametric and therefore it has very high flexibility. The model has also a simple description and interpretation: it builds upon the well known representation of RUM as a stochastic preference, by allowing some additional consumer types to be non-rational.
  • This paper considers trial-offer markets where consumer preferences are modeled by a multinomial logit with social influence and position bias. The social signal for a product is given by its current market share raised to power r. The paper shows that, when r is strictly between 0 and 1, and a static position assignment (e.g., a quality ranking) is used, the market converges to a unique equilibrium where the market shares depend only on product quality, not their initial appeals or the early dynamics. When r is greater than 1, the market becomes unpredictable. In many cases, the market goes to a monopoly for some product: Which product becomes a monopoly depends on the initial conditions of the market. These theoretical results are complemented by an agent-based simulation which indicates that convergence is fast when r is between 0 and 1, and that the quality ranking dominates the well-known popularity ranking in terms of market efficiency. These results shed a new light on the role of social influence which is often blamed for unpredictability, inequalities, and inefficiencies in markets. In contrast, this paper shows that, with a proper social signal and position assignment for the products, the market becomes predictable, and inequalities and inefficiencies can be controlled appropriately.
  • This paper studies assortment and pricing optimization problems under the Two-Stage Luce model (2SLM), a discrete choice model introduced by Echenique and Saito (2018) that generalizes the multinomial logit model (MNL). The model employs an utility function as in the the MNL, and a dominance relation between products. When consumers are offered an assortmentS , they first discard all dominated products in S and then select one of the remaining products using the standard MNL. This model may violate the regularity condition, which states that the probability of choosing a product cannot increase if the offer set is enlarged. Therefore, the 2SLM falls outside the large family of discrete choice models based on random utility which contains almost all choice models studied in revenue management. We prove that the assortment problem under the 2SLM is polynomial-time solvable. Moreover, we show that the capacitated assortment optimization problem is NP-hard and but it admits polynomial-time algorithms for the relevant special cases cases where (1) the dominance relation is attractiveness-correlated and (2) its transitive reduction is a forest. The proofs exploit a strong connection between assortments under the 2SLM and independent sets in comparability graphs. Finally, we study the associated joint pricing and assortment problem under this model. First, we show that well known optimal pricing policy for the MNL can be arbitrarily bad. Our main result in this section is the development of an efficient algorithm for this pricing problem. The resulting optimal pricing strategy is simple to describe: it assigns the same price for all products, except for the one with the highest attractiveness and as well as for the one with the lowest attractiveness.
  • A durable good is a long-lasting good that can be consumed repeatedly over time, and a duropolist is a monopolist in the market of a durable good. In 1972, Ronald Coase conjectured that a duropolist who lacks commitment power cannot sell the good above the competitive price if the time between periods approaches zero. Coase's counterintuitive conjecture was later proven by Gul et al. (1986) under an infinite time horizon model with non-atomic consumers. Remarkably, the situation changes dramatically for atomic consumers and an infinite time horizon. Bagnoli et al. (1989) showed the existence of a subgame-perfect Nash equilibrium where the duropolist extracts all the consumer surplus. Observe that, in these cases, duropoly profits are either arbitrarily smaller or arbitrarily larger than the corresponding static monopoly profits -- the profit a monopolist for an equivalent consumable good could generate. In this paper we show that the result of Bagnoli et al. (1989) is in fact driven by the infinite time horizon. Indeed, we prove that for finite time horizons and atomic agents, in any equilibrium satisfying the standard skimming property, duropoly profits are at most an additive factor more than static monopoly profits. In particular, duropoly profits are always at least static monopoly profits but never exceed twice the static monopoly profits. Finally we show that, for atomic consumers, equilibria may exist that do not satisfy the skimming property. For two time periods, we prove that amongst all equilibria that maximize duropoly profits, at least one of them satisfies the skimming property. We conjecture that this is true for any number of time period.
  • Trial-offer markets, where customers can sample a product before deciding whether to buy it, are ubiquitous in the online experience. Their static and dynamic properties are often studied by assuming that consumers follow a multinomial logit model and try exactly one product. In this paper, we study how to generalize existing results to a more realistic setting where consumers can try multiple products. We show that a multinomial logit model with continuation can be reduced to a standard multinomial logit model with different appeal and product qualities. We examine the consequences of this reduction on the performance and predictability of the market, the role of social influence, and the ranking policies.
  • We propose a model of interdependent scheduling games in which each player controls a set of services that they schedule independently. A player is free to schedule his own services at any time; however, each of these services only begins to accrue reward for the player when all predecessor services, which may or may not be controlled by the same player, have been activated. This model, where players have interdependent services, is motivated by the problems faced in planning and coordinating large-scale infrastructures, e.g., restoring electricity and gas to residents after a natural disaster or providing medical care in a crisis when different agencies are responsible for the delivery of staff, equipment, and medicine. We undertake a game-theoretic analysis of this setting and in particular consider the issues of welfare maximization, computing best responses, Nash dynamics, and existence and computation of Nash equilibria.
  • The purchasing behaviour of consumers is often influenced by numerous factors, including the visibility of the products and the influence of other customers through their own purchases or their recommendations. Motivated by trial-offer and freemium markets and a number of online markets for cultural products, leisure services, and retail, this paper studies the dynamics of a marketplace ran by a single firm and which is visited by heterogeneous consumers whose choice preferences can be modeled using a Mixed Multinomial Logit. In this marketplace, consumers are influenced by past purchases, the inherent appeal of the products, and the visibility of each product. The resulting market generalizes recent models already verified in cultural markets. We examine various marketing policies for this market and analyze their long-term dynamics and the potential benefits of social influence. In particular, we show that the heterogeneity of the customers complicates the market significantly: Many of the optimality and computational properties of the corresponding homogeneous market no longer hold. To remedy these limitations, we explore a market segmentation strategy and quantify its benefits. The theoretical results are complemented by Monte Carlo simulations conducted on examples of interest.
  • We introduce one-way games, a framework motivated by applications in large-scale power restoration, humanitarian logistics, and integrated supply-chains. The distinguishable feature of the games is that the payoff of some player is determined only by her own strategy and does not depend on actions taken by other players. We show that the equilibrium outcome in one-way games without payments and the social cost of any ex-post efficient mechanism, can be far from the optimum. We also show that it is impossible to design a Bayes-Nash incentive-compatible mechanism for one-way games that is budget-balanced, individually rational, and efficient. To address this negative result, we propose a privacy-preserving mechanism that is incentive-compatible and budget-balanced, satisfies ex-post individual rationality conditions, and produces an outcome which is more efficient than the equilibrium without payments. The mechanism is based on a single-offer bargaining and we show that a randomized multi-offer extension brings no additional benefit.
  • Social influence is ubiquitous in cultural markets, from book recommendations in Amazon, to song popularities in iTunes and the ranking of newspaper articles in the online edition of the New York Times to mention only a few. Yet social influence is often presented in a bad light, often because it supposedly increases market unpredictability. Here we study a model of trial-offer markets, in which participants try products and later decide whether to purchase. We consider a simple policy which ranks the products by quality when presenting them to market participants. We show that, in this setting, market efficiency always benefits from social influence. Moreover, we prove that the market converges almost surely to a monopoly for the product of highest quality, making the market both predictable and asymptotically optimal. Computational experiments confirm that the quality ranking policy identifies "blockbusters" in reasonable time, outperforms other policies, and is highly predictable. These results indicate that social influence does not necessarily increase market unpredicatibility. The outcome really depends on how social influence is used.
  • Social influence has been shown to create significant unpredictability in cultural markets, providing one potential explanation why experts routinely fail at predicting commercial success of cultural products. To counteract the difficulty of making accurate predictions, "measure and react" strategies have been advocated but finding a concrete strategy that scales for very large markets has remained elusive so far. Here we propose a "measure and optimize" strategy based on an optimization policy that uses product quality, appeal, and social influence to maximize expected profits in the market at each decision point. Our computational experiments show that our policy leverages social influence to produce significant performance benefits for the market, while our theoretical analysis proves that our policy outperforms in expectation any policy not displaying social information. Our results contrast with earlier work which focused on showing the unpredictability and inequalities created by social influence. Not only do we show for the first time that dynamically showing consumers positive social information under our policy increases the expected performance of the seller in cultural markets. We also show that, in reasonable settings, our policy does not introduce significant unpredictability and identifies "blockbusters". Overall, these results shed new light on the nature of social influence and how it can be leveraged for the benefits of the market.
  • Motivated by applications in retail, online advertising, and cultural markets, this paper studies how to find the optimal assortment and positioning of products subject to a capacity constraint. We prove that the optimal assortment and positioning can be found in polynomial time for a multinomial logit model capturing utilities, position bias, and social influence. Moreover, in a dynamic market, we show that the policy that applies the optimal assortment and positioning and leverages social influence outperforms in expectation any policy not using social influence.