• Privacy amplification is the task by which two cooperating parties transform a shared weak secret, about which an eavesdropper may have side information, into a uniformly random string uncorrelated from the eavesdropper. Privacy amplification against passive adversaries, where it is assumed that the communication is over a public but authenticated channel, can be achieved in the presence of classical as well as quantum side information by a single-message protocol based on strong extractors. In 2009 Dodis and Wichs devised a two-message protocol to achieve privacy amplification against active adversaries, where the public communication channel is no longer assumed to be authenticated, through the use of a strengthening of strong extractors called non-malleable extractors which they introduced. Dodis and Wichs only analyzed the case of classical side information. We consider the task of privacy amplification against active adversaries with quantum side information. Our main result is showing that the Dodis-Wichs protocol remains secure in this scenario provided its main building block, the non-malleable extractor, satisfies a notion of quantum-proof non-malleability which we introduce. We show that an adaptation of a recent construction of non-malleable extractors due to Chattopadhyay et al. is quantum proof, thereby providing the first protocol for privacy amplification that is secure against active quantum adversaries. Our protocol is quantitatively comparable to the near-optimal protocols known in the classical setting.
  • Patterns on broken surfaces are well-known from everyday experience, but surprisingly, how and why they form are very much open questions. Well-defined facets are commonly observed1-4 along fracture surfaces which are created by slow tensile cracks. As facets appear in amorphous materials5-7, their formation does not reflect microscopic order. Fracture mechanics, however, predict that slow crack fronts should be straight, creating mirror-like surfaces8-13. In contrast, facet-forming fronts propagate simultaneously within different planes separated by steps. It is therefore unclear why steps are stable, what determines their path and how they couple to crack front dynamics. Here we show, by integrating real-time imaging of propagating crack fronts with surface measurements, that steps are topological defects of crack fronts; crack front separation into discontinuous overlapping segments provides the condition for step stability. Steps drift at a constant angle to the local front propagation direction and the increased local dissipation due to step formation couples to the long-range deformation of the surrounding crack fronts. Slow crack front dynamics are enslaved to changes in step heights and positions. These observations show how 3D topology couples to 2D fracture dynamics to provide a fundamental picture of how patterned surfaces are generated.
  • We give the first construction of a family of quantum-proof extractors that has optimal seed length dependence $O(\log(n/\varepsilon))$ on the input length $n$ and error $\varepsilon$. Our extractors support any min-entropy $k=\Omega(\log{n} + \log^{1+\alpha}(1/\varepsilon))$ and extract $m=(1-\alpha)k$ bits that are $\varepsilon$-close to uniform, for any desired constant $\alpha > 0$. Previous constructions had a quadratically worse seed length or were restricted to very large input min-entropy or very few output bits. Our result is based on a generic reduction showing that any strong classical condenser is automatically quantum-proof, with comparable parameters. The existence of such a reduction for extractors is a long-standing open question, here we give an affirmative answer for condensers. Once this reduction is established, to obtain our quantum-proof extractors one only needs to consider high entropy sources. We construct quantum-proof extractors with the desired parameters for such sources by extending a classical approach to extractor construction, based on the use of block-sources and sampling, to the quantum setting. Our extractors can be used to obtain improved protocols for device-independent randomness expansion and for privacy amplification.
  • In his 1947 paper that inaugurated the probabilistic method, Erd\H{o}s proved the existence of $2\log{n}$-Ramsey graphs on $n$ vertices. Matching Erd\H{o}s' result with a constructive proof is a central problem in combinatorics, that has gained a significant attention in the literature. The state of the art result was obtained in the celebrated paper by Barak, Rao, Shaltiel and Wigderson [Ann. Math'12], who constructed a $2^{2^{(\log\log{n})^{1-\alpha}}}$-Ramsey graph, for some small universal constant $\alpha > 0$. In this work, we significantly improve the result of Barak~\etal and construct $2^{(\log\log{n})^c}$-Ramsey graphs, for some universal constant $c$. In the language of theoretical computer science, our work resolves the problem of explicitly constructing two-source dispersers for polylogarithmic entropy.
  • When fast cracks become unstable to microscopic branching (micro-branching), fracture no longer occurs in an effective 2D medium. We follow in-plane crack front dynamics via real-time measurements in brittle gels as micro-branching unfolds and progresses. We first show that {\em spatially local} energy balance quantitatively describes crack dynamics, even when translational invariance is badly broken. Furthermore, our results explain micro-branch dynamics; why micro-branches form along spatially localized chains and how finite-time formation of cusps along the crack front leads to their death.
  • In this paper, two structural results concerning low degree polynomials over finite fields are given. The first states that over any finite field $\mathbb{F}$, for any polynomial $f$ on $n$ variables with degree $d \le \log(n)/10$, there exists a subspace of $\mathbb{F}^n$ with dimension $\Omega(d \cdot n^{1/(d-1)})$ on which $f$ is constant. This result is shown to be tight. Stated differently, a degree $d$ polynomial cannot compute an affine disperser for dimension smaller than $\Omega(d \cdot n^{1/(d-1)})$. Using a recursive argument, we obtain our second structural result, showing that any degree $d$ polynomial $f$ induces a partition of $F^n$ to affine subspaces of dimension $\Omega(n^{1/(d-1)!})$, such that $f$ is constant on each part. We extend both structural results to more than one polynomial. We further prove an analog of the first structural result to sparse polynomials (with no restriction on the degree) and to functions that are close to low degree polynomials. We also consider the algorithmic aspect of the two structural results. Our structural results have various applications, two of which are: * Dvir [CC 2012] introduced the notion of extractors for varieties, and gave explicit constructions of such extractors over large fields. We show that over any finite field, any affine extractor is also an extractor for varieties with related parameters. Our reduction also holds for dispersers, and we conclude that Shaltiel's affine disperser [FOCS 2011] is a disperser for varieties over $F_2$. * Ben-Sasson and Kopparty [SIAM J. C 2012] proved that any degree 3 affine disperser over a prime field is also an affine extractor with related parameters. Using our structural results, and based on the work of Kaufman and Lovett [FOCS 2008] and Haramaty and Shpilka [STOC 2010], we generalize this result to any constant degree.
  • We construct a bi-Lipschitz bijection from the Boolean cube to the Hamming ball of equal volume. More precisely, we show that for all even n there exists an explicit bijection f from the n-dimensional Boolean cube to the Hamming ball of equal volume embedded in (n+1)-dimensional Boolean cube, such that for all x and y it holds that distance(x,y) / 5 <= distance(f(x),f(y)) <= 4 distance(x,y) where distance(,) denotes the Hamming distance. In particular, this implies that the Hamming ball is bi-Lipschitz transitive. This result gives a strong negative answer to an open problem of Lovett and Viola [CC 2012], who raised the question in the context of sampling distributions in low-level complexity classes. The conceptual implication is that the problem of proving lower bounds in the context of sampling distributions will require some new ideas beyond the sensitivity-based structural results of Boppana [IPL 97]. We study the mapping f further and show that it (and its inverse) are computable in DLOGTIME-uniform TC0, but not in AC0. Moreover, we prove that f is "approximately local" in the sense that all but the last output bit of f are essentially determined by a single input bit.
  • We perform real-time measurements of the net contact area between two blocks of like material at the onset of frictional slip. We show that the process of interface detachment, which immediately precedes the inception of frictional sliding, is governed by three different types of detachment fronts. These crack-like detachment fronts differ by both their propagation velocities and by the amount of net contact surface reduction caused by their passage. The most rapid fronts propagate at intersonic velocities but generate a negligible reduction in contact area across the interface. Sub-Rayleigh fronts are crack-like modes which propagate at velocities up to the Rayleigh wave speed, VR, and give rise to an approximate 10% reduction in net contact area. The most efficient contact area reduction (~20%) is precipitated by the passage of slow detachment fronts. These fronts propagate at anomalously slow velocities, which are over an order of magnitude lower than VR yet orders of magnitude higher than other characteristic velocity scales such as either slip or loading velocities. Slow fronts are generated, in conjunction with intersonic fronts, by the sudden arrest of sub-Rayleigh fronts. No overall sliding of the interface occurs until either of the slower two fronts traverses the entire interface, and motion at the leading edge of the interface is initiated. Slip at the trailing edge of the interface accompanies the motion of both the slow and sub-Rayleigh fronts. We might expect these modes to be important in both fault nucleation and earthquake dynamics.
  • The dynamics of soliton pulses in the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation (NLSE) driven by an external Traveling wave is studied analytically and numerically. The Hamiltonian structure of the system is used to show that, in the adiabatic approximation for a single soliton, the problem is integrable despite the large number of degrees of freedom. Fixed points of the system are found, and their linear stability is investigated. The fixed points correspond to a Doppler shifted resonance between the external wave and the soliton. The structure and topological changes of the phase space of the soliton parameters as functions of the strength of coupling are investigated. A physical derivation of the driven NLSE is given in the context of optical pulse propagation in asymmetric, twin-core optical fibers. The results can be applied to soliton stabilization and amplification.