• We have carried out a theoretical analysis of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson effective field theory of a classical incommensurate CDW in the presence of weak quenched disorder. While the possibility a sharp phase transition and long-range CDW order are precluded in such systems, we show that any discrete symmetry breaking aspect of the charge order -- nematicity in the case of the unidirectional (stripe) CDW we consider explicitly -- generically survives up to a non-zero critical disorder strength. Such "vestigial order", which is subject to unambiguous macroscopic detection, can serve as an avatar of what would be CDW order in the ideal, zero disorder limit. Various recent experiments in the pseudo-gap regime of the hole-doped cuprate high-temperature superconductors are readily interpreted in light of these results.
  • We combine an analytically solvable mean-field elasto-plastic model with molecular dynamics simulations of a generic glass-former to demonstrate that, depending on their preparation protocol, amorphous materials can yield in two qualitatively distinct ways. We show that well-annealed systems yield in a discontinuous brittle way, as metallic and molecular glasses do. Yielding corresponds in this case to a first-order nonequilibrium phase transition. As the degree of annealing decreases, the first-order character becomes weaker and the transition terminates in a second-order critical point in the universality class of an Ising model in a random field. For even more poorly annealed systems, yielding becomes a smooth crossover, representative of the ductile rheological behavior generically observed in foams, emulsions, and colloidal glasses. Our results show that the variety of yielding behavior found in amorphous materials does not result from the diversity of particle interactions or microscopic dynamics {\it per se}, but is instead unified by carefully considering the role of the initial stability of the system.
  • The random-field Ising model (RFIM) is one of the simplest statistical-mechanical models that captures the anomalous irreversible collective response seen in a wide range of physical, biological, or socio-economic situations in the presence of interactions and intrinsic heterogeneity or disorder. When slowly driven at zero temperature it can display an out-of-equilibrium phase transition associated with critical scaling ("crackling noise"), while it undergoes at equilibrium, under either temperature or disorder-strength changes, a thermodynamic phase transition. We show that the out-of-equilibrium and equilibrium critical behaviors are in the same universality class: they are controlled, in the renormalization-group (RG) sense, by the same zero-temperature fixed point. We do so by combining a field-theoretical formalism that accounts for the multiple metastable states and the exact (functional) RG. As a spin-off, we also demonstrate that critical fluids in disordered porous media are in the same universality class as the RFIM, thereby unifying a broad spectrum of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phenomena.
  • We study by Molecular Dynamics simulation a dense one-component system of particles confined on a spherical substrate. We more specifically investigate the evolution of the structural and dynamical properties of the system when changing the control parameters, the temperature and the curvature of the substrate. We find that the dynamics becomes glassy at low temperature, with a strong slowdown of the relaxation and the emergence of dynamical heterogeneity. The prevalent local $6$-fold order is frustrated by curvature and we analyze in detail the role of the topological defects in the statics and the dynamics of the particle assembly.
  • We show that, contrary to previous suggestions based on computer simulations or erroneous theoretical treatments, the critical points of the random-field Ising model out of equilibrium, when quasi-statically changing the applied source at zero temperature, and in equilibrium are not in the same universality class below some critical dimension $d_{DR}\approx 5.1$. We demonstrate this by implementing a non-perturbative functional renormalization group for the associated dynamical field theory. Above $d_{DR}$, the avalanches, which characterize the evolution of the system at zero temperature, become irrelevant at large distance, and hysteresis and equilibrium critical points are then controlled by the same fixed point. We explain how to use computer simulation and finite-size scaling to check the correspondence between in and out of equilibrium criticality in a far less ambiguous way than done so far.
  • Frustration and the associated phenomenon of "avoided criticality" have been proposed as an explanation for the dramatic relaxation slowdown in glass-forming liquids. To test this, we have undertaken a Monte-Carlo study of possibly the simplest such problem, the 2-dimensional XY model with frustration corresponding to a small flux, $f$, per plaquette. At $f=0$, there is a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition at $T^*$, but at any small but non-zero $f$, this transition is avoided, and replaced (presumably) by a vortex-ordering transition at much lower temperatures. We thus have studied the evolution of the dynamics for small and moderate $f$ as the system is cooled from above $T^*$ to below. While we do find strongly temperature dependent slowing of the dynamics as $T$ crosses $T^*$, and that simultaneously the dynamics becomes more complex, neither effect is anywhere nearly as dramatic as the corresponding phenomena in glass-forming liquids. At the very least, this implies that the properties of supercooled liquids must depend on more than frustration and the existence of an avoided transition.
  • Geometric frustration describes the inability of a local molecular arrangement, such as icosahedra found in metallic glasses and in model atomic glass-formers, to tile space. Local icosahedral order however is strongly frustrated in Euclidean space, which obscures any causal relationship with the observed dynamical slowdown. Here we relieve frustration in a model glass-forming liquid by curving 3-dimensional space onto the surface of a 4-dimensional hypersphere. For sufficient curvature, frustration vanishes and the liquid freezes in a fully icosahedral structure via a sharp `transition'. Frustration increases upon reducing the curvature, and the transition to the icosahedral state smoothens while glassy dynamics emerges. Decreasing the curvature leads to decoupling between dynamical and structural length scales and the decrease of kinetic fragility. This sheds light on the observed glass-forming behavior in the Euclidean space.
  • This is a commentary on two recent experimental papers in PNAS by Vivek et al. and Illing et al. that convincingly address an issue at the junction of two fundamental questions in glass physics: the role of the dimensionality of space on the glass transition and the possible existence of long wavelength fluctuations in two-dimensional amorphous solids.
  • We study the role of fluctuations on the thermodynamic glassy properties of plaquette spin models, more specifically on the transition involving an overlap order parameter in the presence of an attractive coupling between different replicas of the system. We consider both short-range fluctuations associated with the local environment on Bethe lattices and long-range fluctuations that distinguish Euclidean from Bethe lattices with the same local environment. We find that the phase diagram in the temperature-coupling plane is very sensitive to the former but, at least for the $3$-dimensional (square pyramid) model, appears qualitatively or semi-quantitatively unchanged by the latter. This surprising result suggests that the mean-field theory of glasses provides a reasonable account of the glassy thermodynamics of models otherwise described in terms of the kinetically constrained motion of localized defects and taken as a paradigm for the theory of dynamic facilitation. We discuss the possible implications for the dynamical behavior.
  • The growing sluggishness of glass-forming liquids is thought to be accompanied by growing structural order. The nature of such order, however, remains hotly debated. A decade ago, point-to-set (PTS) correlation lengths were proposed as measures of amorphous order in glass formers, but recent results raise doubts as to their generality. Here, we extend the definition of PTS correlations to agnostically capture any type of growing order in liquids, be it local or amorphous. This advance enables the formulation of a clear distinction between slowing down due to conventional critical ordering and that due to glassiness, and provides a unified framework to assess the relative importance of specific local order and generic amorphous order in glass formation.
  • We revisit the phenomenon of spinodals in the presence of quenched disorder and develop a complete theory for it. We focus on the spinodal of an Ising model in a quenched random field (RFIM), which has applications in many areas from materials to social science. By working at zero temperature in the quasi-statically driven RFIM, thermal fluctuations are eliminated and one can give a rigorous content to the notion of spinodal. We show that the latter is due to the depinning and the subsequent expansion of rare droplets. We work out the associated critical behavior, which, in any finite dimension, is very different from the mean-field one: the characteristic length diverges exponentially and the thermodynamic quantities display very mild nonanalyticities much like in a Griffith phenomenon. From the recently established connection between the spinodal of the RFIM and glassy dynamics, our results also allow us to conclusively assess the physical content and the status of the dynamical transition predicted by the mean-field theory of glass-forming liquids.
  • This is a comment on the recent letter by Jack and Garrahan on "Phase transition for quenched coupled replicas in a plaquette spin model of glasses".
  • Perturbation theory for the random-field Ising model (RFIM) has the infamous attribute that it predicts at all orders a dimensional-reduction property for the critical behavior that turns out to be wrong in low dimension. Guided by our previous work based on the nonperturbative functional renormalization group (NP-FRG), we show that one can still make some use of the perturbation theory for a finite range of dimension below the upper critical dimension, d=6. The new twist is to account for the influence of large-scale zero-temperature events known as avalanches. These avalanches induce nonanalyticities in the field dependence of the correlation functions and renormalized vertices, and we compute in a loop expansion the eigenvalue associated with the corresponding anomalous operator. The outcome confirms the NP-FRG prediction that the dimensional-reduction fixed point correctly describes the dominant critical scaling of the RFIM above some dimension close to 5 but not below.
  • Slow dynamics in glassy systems is often interpreted as due to thermally activated events between "metastable" states. This emphasizes the role of nonperturbative fluctuations, which is especially dramatic when these fluctuations destroy a putative phase transition predicted at the mean-field level. To gain insight into such hard problems, we consider the implementation of a generic back-and-forth process, between microscopic theory and observable behavior via effective theories, in a toy model that is simple enough to allow for a thorough investigation: the one-dimensional $\varphi^4$ theory at low temperature. We consider two ways of restricting the extent of the fluctuations, which both lead to a nonconvex effective potential (or free energy) : either through a finite-size system or by means of a running infrared cutoff within the nonperturbative Renormalization Group formalism. We discuss the physical insight one can get and the ways to treat strongly nonperturbative fluctuations in this context.
  • We study the dynamics of a one-component liquid constrained on a spherical substrate, a 2-sphere, and investigate how the mode-coupling theory (MCT) can describe the new features brought by the presence of curvature. To this end we have derived the MCT equations in a spherical geometry. We find that, as seen from the MCT, the slow dynamics of liquids in curved space at low temperature does not qualitatively differ from that of glass-forming liquids in Euclidean space. The MCT predicts the right trend for the evolution of the relaxation slowdown with curvature but is dramatically off at a quantitative level.
  • The random-field Ising model shows extreme critical slowdown that has been described by activated dynamic scaling: the characteristic time for the relaxation to equilibrium diverges exponentially with the correlation length, $\ln \tau\sim \xi^\psi/T$ , with $\psi$ an \textit{a priori} unknown barrier exponent. Through a nonperturbative functional renormalization group, we show that for spatial dimensions $d$ less than a critical value $d_{DR} \simeq 5.1$, also associated with dimensional-reduction breakdown, $\psi=\theta$ with $\theta$ the temperature exponent near the zero-temperature fixed point that controls the critical behavior. For $d>d_{DR}$ on the other hand, $\psi=\theta-2\lambda$ where $\theta=2$ and $\lambda>0$ a new exponent. At the upper critical dimension $d=6$, $\lambda=1$ so that $\psi=0$, and activated scaling gives way to conventional scaling. We give a physical interpretation of the results in terms of collective events in real space, avalanches and droplets. We also propose a way to check the two regimes by computer simulations of long-range 1-$d$ systems.
  • Despite the absence of consensus on a theory of the transition from supercooled liquids to glasses, the experimental observations suggest that a detail-independent theory should exist.
  • We study the critical behavior of the one-dimensional random field Ising model (RFIM) with long-range interactions ($\propto r^{-(d+\sigma)}$) by the nonperturbative functional renormalization group. We find two distinct regimes of critical behavior as a function of $\sigma$, separated by a critical value $\sigma_c$. What distinguishes these two regimes is the presence or not of a cusp-like nonanalyticity in the functional dependence of the renormalized cumulants of the random field at the fixed point. This change of behavior can be associated to the characteristics of the large-scale avalanches present in the system at zero temperature. We propose ways to check these predictions through lattice simulations. We also discuss the difference with the RFIM on the Dyson hierarchical lattice.
  • We consider the theoretical description of a fluid adsorbed in a nanopore. Hysteresis and discontinuities in the isotherms in general hampers the determination of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, even in computer simulations. A proposed way around this has been to consider both a reservoir of small size and a pore of small extent in order to restrict the fluctuations of density and approach a classical van der Waals loop. We assess this suggestion by thoroughly studying through density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations the influence of system size on the equilibrium configurations of the adsorbed fluid and on the resulting isotherms. We stress the importance of pore-symmetry-breaking states that even for modest pore sizes lead to discontinuous isotherms and we discuss the physical relevance of these states and the methodological consequences for computing thermodynamic quantities.
  • We investigate by Molecular Dynamics simulation a system of $N$ particles moving on the surface of a two-dimensional sphere and interacting by a Lennard-Jones potential. We detail the way to account for the changes brought by a nonzero curvature, both at a methodological and at a physical level. When compared to a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones liquid on the Euclidean plane, where a phase transition to an ordered hexagonal phase takes place, we find that the presence of excess defects imposed by the topology of the sphere frustrates the hexagonal order. We observe at high density a rapid increase of the relaxation time when the temperature is decreased, whereas in the same range of temperature the pair correlation function of the system evolves only moderately.
  • The concept of "fragility", which was introduced to characterize the degree of super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the relaxation time and transport coefficients, has since been taken as a key quantity that seems to correlate with other properties of glass-forming liquids and polymers. With the goal of assessing the usefulness and the robustness of the concept, we address here several questions: How to best quantify fragility? How significant are the observed differences in fragility? Is fragility connected to "cooperativity" and collective behavior?
  • We consider the zero-temperature fixed points controlling the critical behavior of the $d$-dimensional random-field Ising, and more generally $O(N)$, models. We clarify the nature of these fixed points and their stability in the region of the $(N,d)$ plane where one passes from a critical behavior satisfying the $d\rightarrow d-2$ dimensional reduction to one where it breaks down due to the appearance of strong enough nonanalyticities in the functional dependence of the cumulants of the renormalized disorder. We unveil an intricate and unusual behavior.
  • We introduce an approach to derive an effective scalar field theory for the glass transition; the fluctuating field is the overlap between equilibrium configurations. We apply it to the case of constrained liquids for which the introduction of a conjugate source to the overlap field was predicted to lead to an equilibrium critical point. We show that the long-distance physics in the vicinity of this critical point is in the same universality class as that of a paradigmatic disordered model: the random-field Ising model. The quenched disorder is provided here by a reference equilibrium liquid configuration. We discuss to what extent this field-theoretical description and the mapping to the random field Ising model hold in the whole supercooled liquid regime, in particular near the glass transition.
  • We propose a simple, exactly solvable, model of interface growth in a random medium that is a variant of the zero-temperature random-field Ising model on the Cayley tree. This model is shown to have a phase diagram (critical depinning field versus disorder strength) qualitatively similar to that obtained numerically on the cubic lattice. We then introduce a specifically tailored random graph that allows an exact asymptotic analysis of the height and width of the interface. We characterize the change of morphology of the interface as a function of the disorder strength, a change that is found to take place at a multicritical point along the depinning-transition line.
  • We show that the critical scaling behavior of random-field systems with short-range interactions and disorder correlations cannot be described in general by only two independent exponents, contrary to previous claims. This conclusion is based on a theoretical description of the whole (d,N) domain of the d-dimensional random-field O(N) model and points to the role of rare events that are overlooked by the proposed derivations of two-exponent scaling. Quite strikingly, however, the numerical estimates of the critical exponents of the random field Ising model are extremely close to the predictions of the two-exponent scaling, so that the issue cannot be decided on the basis of numerical simulations.