• One of the scientific objectives of NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of Fermi's main instrument, the Large Area Telescope, into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. We present the principal instrument properties, which have been determined as a function of energy and angle, including the channel-energy relation, the energy resolution, the effective area and the spatial homogeneity.
  • The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.
  • Gamma-rays from radioactive 26Al (half life ~7.2 10^5 yr) provide a 'snapshot' view of ongoing nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The Galaxy is relatively transparent to such gamma-rays, and emission has been found concentrated along the plane of the Galaxy. This led to the conclusion1 that massive stars throughout the Galaxy dominate the production of 26Al. On the other hand, meteoritic data show locally-produced 26Al, perhaps from spallation reactions in the protosolar disk. Furthermore, prominent gamma-ray emission from the Cygnus region suggests that a substantial fraction of Galactic 26Al could originate in localized star-forming regions. Here we report high spectral resolution measurements of 26Al emission at 1808.65 keV, which demonstrate that the 26Al source regions corotate with the Galaxy, supporting its Galaxy-wide origin. We determine a present-day equilibrium mass of 2.8 (+/-0.8) M_sol of 26Al. We use this to estimate that the frequency of core collapse (i.e. type Ib/c and type II) supernovae to be 1.9(+/- 1.1) events per century.
  • The next large NASA mission in the field of gamma-ray astronomy, GLAST, is scheduled for launch in 2007. Aside from the main instrument LAT (Large-Area Telescope), a gamma-ray telescope for the energy range between 20 MeV and > 100 GeV, a secondary instrument, the GLAST burst monitor (GBM), is foreseen. With this monitor one of the key scientific objectives of the mission, the determination of the high-energy behaviour of gamma-ray bursts and transients can be ensured. Its task is to increase the detection rate of gamma-ray bursts for the LAT and to extend the energy range to lower energies (from ~10 keV to \~30 MeV). It will provide real-time burst locations over a wide FoV with sufficient accuracy to allow repointing the GLAST spacecraft. Time-resolved spectra of many bursts recorded with LAT and the burst monitor will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from GRBs over unprecedented seven decades of energy. This will help to advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which gamma-rays are generated in gamma-ray bursts.
  • The spectrometer SPI, one of the two main instruments of the INTEGRAL spacecraft, has strong capabilities in the Field of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) detections. In its 16 degree Field of view (FoV) SPI is able to trigger and to localize GRBs. With its large anticoincidence shield (ACS) of 512 kg of BGO crystals SPI is able to detect GRBs quasi omnidirectionally with a very high sensitivity. The ACS GRB alerts will provide GRB arrival times with high accuracy but with no or very rough positional information. The expected GRB detection rate in SPI's FoV will be one per month and for the ACS around 300 per year. At MPE two SPI software contributions to the real-time INTEGRAL burst-alert system (IBAS) at the INTEGRAL science data centre ISDC have been developed. The SPI-ACS branch of IBAS will produce burst alerts and light-curves with 50 ms resolution. It is planned to use ACS burst alerts in the 3rd interplanetary network. The SPI-FoV branch of IBAS is currently under development at MPE. The system is using the energy and timing information of single and multiple events detected by the Germanium-camera of SPI. Using the imaging algorithm developed at the University of Birmingham the system is expected to locate strong bursts with an accuracy of better than 1 degree.
  • The anticoincidence shield (ACS) of the INTEGRAL-spectrometer SPI consists of 512 kg of BGO crystals. This massive scintillator allows the measurement of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a very high sensitivity. Estimations have shown that with the ACS some hundred gamma-ray bursts per year on the 5 sigma level can be detected, having an equivalent sensitivity to BATSE. The GRB detection will be part of the real-time INTEGRAL burst-alert system (IBAS). The ACS branch of IBAS will produce burst alerts and light curves with 50 ms resolution. It is planned to use ACS burst alerts in the 4th interplanetary network (IPN).