• Perceptrons are the building blocks of many theoretical approaches to a wide range of complex systems, ranging from neural networks and deep learning machines, to constraint satisfaction problems, glasses and ecosystems. Despite their applicability and importance, a detailed study of their Langevin dynamics has never been performed yet. Here we derive the mean-field dynamical equations that describe the continuous random perceptron in the thermodynamic limit, in a very general setting with arbitrary noise and friction kernels, not necessarily related by equilibrium relations. We derive the equations in two ways: via a dynamical cavity method, and via a path-integral approach in its supersymmetric formulation. The end point of both approaches is the reduction of the dynamics of the system to an effective stochastic process for a representative dynamical variable. Because the perceptron is formally very close to a system of interacting particles in a high dimensional space, the methods we develop here can be transferred to the study of liquid and glasses in high dimensions. Potentially interesting applications are thus the study of the glass transition in active matter, the study of the dynamics around the jamming transition, and the calculation of rheological properties in driven systems.
  • We combine an analytically solvable mean-field elasto-plastic model with molecular dynamics simulations of a generic glass-former to demonstrate that, depending on their preparation protocol, amorphous materials can yield in two qualitatively distinct ways. We show that well-annealed systems yield in a discontinuous brittle way, as metallic and molecular glasses do. Yielding corresponds in this case to a first-order nonequilibrium phase transition. As the degree of annealing decreases, the first-order character becomes weaker and the transition terminates in a second-order critical point in the universality class of an Ising model in a random field. For even more poorly annealed systems, yielding becomes a smooth crossover, representative of the ductile rheological behavior generically observed in foams, emulsions, and colloidal glasses. Our results show that the variety of yielding behavior found in amorphous materials does not result from the diversity of particle interactions or microscopic dynamics {\it per se}, but is instead unified by carefully considering the role of the initial stability of the system.
  • We study rough high-dimensional landscapes in which an increasingly stronger preference for a given configuration emerges. Such energy landscapes arise in glass physics and inference. In particular we focus on random Gaussian functions, and on the spiked-tensor model and generalizations. We thoroughly analyze the statistical properties of the corresponding landscapes and characterize the associated geometrical phase transitions. In order to perform our study, we develop a framework based on the Kac-Rice method that allows to compute the complexity of the landscape, i.e. the logarithm of the typical number of stationary points and their Hessian. This approach generalizes the one used to compute rigorously the annealed complexity of mean-field glass models. We discuss its advantages with respect to previous frameworks, in particular the thermodynamical replica method which is shown to lead to partially incorrect predictions.
  • A quasi two-dimensional colloidal suspension is studied under the influence of immobilisation (pinning) of a random fraction of its particles. We introduce a novel experimental method to perform random pinning and, with the support of numerical simulation, we find that increasing the pinning concentration smoothly arrests the system, with a cross-over from a regime of high mobility and high entropy to a regime of low mobility and low entropy. At the local level, we study fluctuations in area fraction and concentration of pins and map them to entropic structural signatures and local mobility, obtaining a measure for the local entropic fluctuations of the experimental system.
  • We study Harmonic Soft Spheres as a model of thermal structural glasses in the limit of infinite dimensions. We show that cooling, compressing and shearing a glass lead to a Gardner transition and, hence, to a marginally stable amorphous solid as found for Hard Spheres systems. A general outcome of our results is that a reduced stability of the glass favors the appearance of the Gardner transition. Therefore using strong perturbations, e.g. shear and compression, on standard glasses or using weak perturbations on weakly stable glasses, e.g. the ones prepared close to the jamming point, are the generic ways to induce a Gardner transition. The formalism that we discuss allows to study general perturbations, including strain deformations that are important to study soft glassy rheology at the mean field level.
  • We unveil the universal (model-independent) symmetry satisfied by Schwinger-Keldysh quantum field theories whenever they describe equilibrium dynamics. This is made possible by a generalization of the Schwinger-Keldysh path-integral formalism in which the physical time can be re-parametrized to arbitrary contours in the complex plane. Strong relations between correlation functions, such as the fluctuation-dissipation theorems, are derived as immediate consequences of this symmetry of equilibrium. In this view, quantum non-equilibrium dynamics -- e.g. when driving with a time-dependent potential -- are seen as symmetry-breaking processes. The symmetry-breaking terms of the action are identified as a measure of irreversibility, or entropy creation, defined at the level of a single quantum trajectory. Moreover, they are shown to obey quantum fluctuation theorems. These results extend stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum realm.
  • We study the out-of-equilibrium aging dynamics of the Random Energy Model (REM) ruled by a single spin-flip Metropolis dynamics. We focus on the dynamical evolution taking place on time-scales diverging with the system size. Our aim is to show to what extent the activated dynamics displayed by the REM can be described in terms of an effective trap model. We identify two time regimes: the first one corresponds to the process of escaping from a basin in the energy landscape and to the subsequent exploration of high energy configurations, whereas the second one corresponds to the evolution from a deep basin to the other. By combining numerical simulations with analytical arguments we show why the trap model description does not hold in the former but becomes exact in the second.
  • In this work we study the stability of the equilibria reached by ecosystems formed by a large number of species. The model we focus on are Lotka-Volterra equations with symmetric random interactions. Our theoretical analysis, confirmed by our numerical studies, shows that for strong and heterogeneous interactions the system displays multiple equilibria which are all marginally stable. This property allows us to obtain general identities between diversity and single species responses, which generalize and saturate May's bound. By connecting the model to systems studied in condensed matter physics, we show that the multiple equilibria regime is analogous to a critical spin-glass phase. This relation provides a new perspective as to why many systems in several different fields appear to be poised at the edge of stability and also suggests new experimental ways to probe marginal stability.
  • We analyze the unusual slow dynamics that emerges in the bad metal delocalized phase preceding the Many-Body Localization transition by using single-particle Anderson Localization on the Bethe lattice as a toy model of many-body dynamics in Fock space. We probe the dynamical evolution by measuring observables such as the imbalance and equilibrium correlation functions, which display slow dynamics and power-laws strikingly similar to the ones observed in recent simulations and experiments. We relate this unusual behavior to the non-ergodic spectral statistics found on Bethe lattices. We discuss different scenarii, such as a true intermediate phase which persists in the thermodynamic limit versus a glassy regime established on finite but very large time and length-scales only, and their implications for real space dynamical properties. In the latter, slow dynamics and power-laws extend on a very large time-window but are eventually cut-off on a time-scale that diverges at the MBL transition.
  • In this manuscript, in honour of L. Kadanoff, we present recent progress obtained in the description of finite dimensional glassy systems thanks to the Migdal-Kadanoff renormalisation group (MK-RG). We provide a critical assessment of the method, in particular discuss its limitation in describing situations in which an infinite number of pure states might be present, and analyse the MK-RG flow in the limit of infinite dimensions. MK-RG predicts that the spin-glass transition in a field and the glass transition are governed by zero-temperature fixed points of the renormalization group flow. This implies a typical energy scale that grows, approaching the transition, as a power of the correlation length, thus leading to enormously large time-scales as expected from experiments and simulations. These fixed points exist only in dimensions larger than $d_L>3$ but they nevertheless influence the RG flow below it, in particular in three dimensions. MK-RG thus predicts a similar behavior for spin-glasses in a field and models of glasses and relates it to the presence of avoided critical points.
  • In this paper we present a thorough study of transport, spectral and wave-function properties at the Anderson localization critical point in spatial dimensions $d = 3$, $4$, $5$, $6$. Our aim is to analyze the dimensional dependence and to asses the role of the $d\rightarrow \infty$ limit provided by Bethe lattices and tree-like structures. Our results strongly suggest that the upper critical dimension of Anderson localization is infinite. Furthermore, we find that the $d_U=\infty$ is a much better starting point compared to $d_L=2$ to describe even three dimensional systems. We find that critical properties and finite size scaling behavior approach by increasing $d$ the ones found for Bethe lattices: the critical state becomes an insulator characterized by Poisson statistics and corrections to the thermodynamics limit become logarithmic in $N$. In the conclusion, we present physical consequences of our results, propose connections with the non-ergodic delocalised phase suggested for the Anderson model on infinite dimensional lattices and discuss perspectives for future research studies.
  • We study the role of fluctuations on the thermodynamic glassy properties of plaquette spin models, more specifically on the transition involving an overlap order parameter in the presence of an attractive coupling between different replicas of the system. We consider both short-range fluctuations associated with the local environment on Bethe lattices and long-range fluctuations that distinguish Euclidean from Bethe lattices with the same local environment. We find that the phase diagram in the temperature-coupling plane is very sensitive to the former but, at least for the $3$-dimensional (square pyramid) model, appears qualitatively or semi-quantitatively unchanged by the latter. This surprising result suggests that the mean-field theory of glasses provides a reasonable account of the glassy thermodynamics of models otherwise described in terms of the kinetically constrained motion of localized defects and taken as a paradigm for the theory of dynamic facilitation. We discuss the possible implications for the dynamical behavior.
  • We study the statistics of the local resolvent and non-ergodic properties of eigenvectors for a generalised Rosenzweig-Porter $N\times N$ random matrix model, undergoing two transitions separated by a delocalised non-ergodic phase. Interpreting the model as the combination of on-site random energies $\{a_i\}$ and a structurally disordered hopping, we found that each eigenstate is delocalised over $N^{2-\gamma}$ sites close in energy $|a_j-a_i|\leq N^{1-\gamma}$ in agreement with Kravtsov \emph{et al}, arXiv:1508.01714. Our other main result, obtained combining a recurrence relation for the resolvent matrix with insights from Dyson's Brownian motion, is to show that the properties of the non-ergodic delocalised phase can be probed studying the statistics of the local resolvent in a non-standard scaling limit.
  • We investigate the dynamics of the randomly pinned Fredrickson-Andersen model on the Bethe lattice. We find a line of random pinning dynamical transitions whose dynamical critical properties are in the same universality class of the $A_2$ and $A_3$ transitions of Mode Coupling Theory. The $A_3$ behavior appears at the terminal point, where the relaxation becomes logarithmic and the relaxation time diverges exponentially. We explain the critical behavior in terms of self-induced disorder and avalanches, strengthening the relationship discussed in recent works between glassy dynamics and Random Field Ising Model.
  • We revisit the phenomenon of spinodals in the presence of quenched disorder and develop a complete theory for it. We focus on the spinodal of an Ising model in a quenched random field (RFIM), which has applications in many areas from materials to social science. By working at zero temperature in the quasi-statically driven RFIM, thermal fluctuations are eliminated and one can give a rigorous content to the notion of spinodal. We show that the latter is due to the depinning and the subsequent expansion of rare droplets. We work out the associated critical behavior, which, in any finite dimension, is very different from the mean-field one: the characteristic length diverges exponentially and the thermodynamic quantities display very mild nonanalyticities much like in a Griffith phenomenon. From the recently established connection between the spinodal of the RFIM and glassy dynamics, our results also allow us to conclusively assess the physical content and the status of the dynamical transition predicted by the mean-field theory of glass-forming liquids.
  • We develop a real space renormalisation group analysis of disordered models of glasses, in particular of the spin models at the origin of the Random First Order Transition theory. We find three fixed points respectively associated to the liquid state, to the critical behavior and to the glass state. The latter two are zero-temperature ones; this provides a natural explanation of the growth of effective activation energy scale and the concomitant huge increase of relaxation time approaching the glass transition. The lower critical dimension depends on the nature of the interacting degrees of freedom and is higher than three for all models. This does not prevent three dimensional systems from being glassy. Indeed, we find that their renormalisation group flow is affected by the fixed points existing in higher dimension and in consequence is non-trivial. Within our theoretical framework the glass transition results to be an avoided phase transition.
  • By analyzing two Kinetically Constrained Models of supercooled liquids we show that the anomalous transport of a driven tracer observed in supercooled liquids is another facet of the phenomenon of dynamical heterogeneity. We focus on the Fredrickson-Andersen and the Bertin-Bouchaud-Lequeux models. By numerical simulations and analytical arguments we demonstrate that the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation and the observed field-induced superdiffusion have the same physical origin: while a fraction of probes do not move, others jump repeatedly because they are close to local mobile regions. The anomalous fluctuations observed out of equilibrium in presence of a pulling force $\epsilon$, $\sigma_x^2(t) = \langle x_\epsilon^2(t) \rangle - \langle x_\epsilon(t) \rangle^2 \sim t^{3/2}$, which are accompanied by the asymptotic decay $\alpha_\epsilon(t)\sim t^{-1/2}$ of the non-Gaussian parameter from non-trivial values to zero, are due to the splitting of the probes population in the two (mobile and immobile) groups and to dynamical correlations, a mechanism expected to happen generically in supercooled liquids.
  • What characterises a solid is its way to respond to external stresses. Ordered solids, such crystals, display an elastic regime followed by a plastic one, both well understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the one of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges by decreasing the temperature as a phase transition where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all non-linear elastic modulii diverge and standard elasticity theory does not hold anymore. Below the transition the response to deformation becomes history and time-dependent.
  • This work provide a thorough study of L\'evy or heavy-tailed random matrices (LM). By analysing the self-consistent equation on the probability distribution of the diagonal elements of the resolvent we establish the equation determining the localisation transition and obtain the phase diagram of LMs. Using arguments based on super-symmetric field theory and Dyson Brownian motion we show that the eigenvalue statistics is the same one of the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble in the whole delocalised phase and is Poisson in the localised phase. Our numerics confirms these findings, valid in the limit of infinitely large LMs, but also reveals that the characteristic scale governing finite size effects diverges much faster than a power law approaching the transition and is already very large far from it. This leads to a very wide cross-over region in which the system looks as if it were in a mixed phase. Our results, together with the ones obtained previously, provide now a complete theory of L\'evy matrices.
  • This is a comment on the recent letter by Jack and Garrahan on "Phase transition for quenched coupled replicas in a plaquette spin model of glasses".
  • The aim of these lectures, given at the Les Houches Summer School of Physics "Strongly Interacting Quantum Systems Out of Equilibrium", is providing an introduction to several important and interesting facets of out of equilibrium dynamics. In recent years, there has been a boost in the research on quantum systems out of equilibrium. If fifteen years ago hard condensed matter and classical statistical physics remained rather separate research fields, now the focus on several kinds of out of equilibrium dynamics is making them closer and closer. The aim of my lectures was to present to the students the richness of this topic, insisting on the common concepts and showing that there is much to gain in considering and learning out of equilibrium dynamics as a whole research field.
  • By using real space renormalisation group (RG) methods we show that spin-glasses in a field display a new kind of transition in high dimensions. The corresponding critical properties and the spin-glass phase are governed by two non-perturbative zero temperature fixed points of the RG flow. We compute the critical exponents, discuss the RG flow and its relevance for three dimensional systems. The new spin-glass phase we discovered has unusual properties, which are intermediate between the ones conjectured by droplet and full replica symmetry breaking theories. These results provide a new perspective on the long-standing debate about the behaviour of spin-glasses in a field.
  • Slow dynamics in glassy systems is often interpreted as due to thermally activated events between "metastable" states. This emphasizes the role of nonperturbative fluctuations, which is especially dramatic when these fluctuations destroy a putative phase transition predicted at the mean-field level. To gain insight into such hard problems, we consider the implementation of a generic back-and-forth process, between microscopic theory and observable behavior via effective theories, in a toy model that is simple enough to allow for a thorough investigation: the one-dimensional $\varphi^4$ theory at low temperature. We consider two ways of restricting the extent of the fluctuations, which both lead to a nonconvex effective potential (or free energy) : either through a finite-size system or by means of a running infrared cutoff within the nonperturbative Renormalization Group formalism. We discuss the physical insight one can get and the ways to treat strongly nonperturbative fluctuations in this context.
  • We introduce a new disordered system, the Super-Potts model, which is a more frustrated version of the Potts glass. Its elementary degrees of freedom are variables that can take M values and are coupled via pair-wise interactions. Its exact solution on a completely connected lattice demonstrates that for large enough M it belongs to the class of mean-field systems solved by a one step replica symmetry breaking Ansatz. Numerical simulations by the parallel tempering technique show that in three dimensions it displays a phenomenological behaviour similar to the one of glass-forming liquids. The Super-Potts glass is therefore the first long-sought disordered model allowing one to perform extensive and detailed studies of the Random First Order Transition in finite dimensions. We also discuss its behaviour for small values of M, which is similar to the one of spin-glasses in a field.
  • We develop a theory of amorphous interfaces in glass-forming liquids. We show that the statistical properties of these surfaces, which separate regions characterized by different amorphous arrangements of particles, coincide with the ones of domain walls in the random field Ising model. A major consequence of our results is that super-cooled liquids are characterized by two different static lengths: the point-to-set $\xi_{PS}$ which is a measure of the spatial extent of cooperative rearranging regions and the wandering length $\xi_\perp$ which is related to the fluctuations of their shape. We find that $\xi_\perp$ grows when approaching the glass transition but slower than $\xi_{PS}$. The wandering length increases as $s_c^{-1/2}$, where $s_c$ is the configurational entropy. Our results strengthen the relationship with the random field Ising model found in recent works. They are in agreement with previous numerical studies of amorphous interfaces and provide a theoretical framework for explaining numerical and experimental findings on pinned particle systems and static lengths in glass-forming liquids.