• We present photometry, spectroscopy, and host-galaxy integral-field spectroscopy of the Type II supernova (SN) 2016esw in CGCG~229-009 from the first day after the explosion up to 120 days. Its light-curve shape is similar to that of a typical SN II; however, SN 2016esw is near the high-luminosity end of the SN II distribution, with a peak of $M^{\rm max}_{V}=-18.36$ mag. The $V$-band light curve exhibits a long recombination phase for a SN II (similar to the long-lived plateau of SN 2004et). Considering the well-known relation between the luminosity and the plateau decline rate, SN 2016esw should have a $V$-band slope of $\sim 2.10$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$; however, SN 2016esw has a substantially flatter plateau with a slope of $1.01\pm 0.26$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$, perhaps indicating that interacting Type II supernovae are not useful for cosmology. At 19.5 days post-explosion, the spectrum presents a boxy H$\alpha$ emission line with flat absorption profiles, suggesting interaction between the ejecta and circumstellar matter. Finally, based on the spectral properties, SN 2016esw shows similarities with the luminous and interacting SN 2007pk at early epochs, particularly in terms of observable line features and their evolution.
  • We investigate $r$-process nucleosynthesis in three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet-driven supernovae resulting from rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized core-collapse. We explore the effect of misaligning the pre-collapse magnetic field with respect to the rotation axis by performing four simulations: one aligned model and models with 15, 30, and 45 degree misalignments. The simulations we present employ a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to post-bounce neutrino emission and absorption. We track the thermodynamic properties of the ejected material with Lagrangian tracer particles and analyse its composition with the nuclear reaction network SkyNet. By using different neutrino luminosities in post-processing the tracer data with SkyNet, we constrain the impact of uncertainties in neutrino luminosities. We find that, for the aligned model considered here, the use of an approximate leakage scheme results in neutrino luminosity uncertainties corresponding to a factor of 100-1000 uncertainty in the abundance of third peak $r$-process elements. Our results show that for misalignments of 30 degrees or less, $r$-process elements are robustly produced as long as neutrino luminosities are reasonably low ($\lesssim 5 \times 10^{52}$ erg s$^{-1}$). For a more extreme misalignment of 45 degrees, we find the production of $r$-process elements beyond the second peak significantly reduced. We conclude that robust $r$-process nucleosynthesis in magnetorotational supernovae requires a progenitor stellar core with a large poloidal magnetic field component that is at least moderately (within $\sim 30$ degrees) aligned with the rotation axis.
  • We investigate r-process nucleosynthesis in three-dimensional (3D) general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of rapidly rotating strongly magnetized core collapse. The simulations include a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to postbounce neutrino emission and absorption. We track the composition of the ejected material using the nuclear reaction network SkyNet. Our results show that the 3D dynamics of magnetorotational core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) are important for their nucleosynthetic signature. We find that production of r-process material beyond the second peak is reduced by a factor of 100 when the magnetorotational jets produced by the rapidly rotating core undergo a kink instability. Our results indicate that 3D magnetorotationally powered CCSNe are a robust r-process source only if they are obtained by the collapse of cores with unrealistically large precollapse magnetic fields of order $10^{13}$G. Additionally, a comparison simulation that we restrict to axisymmetry, results in overly optimistic r-process production for lower magnetic field strengths.
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.