• Motivated by the preponderance of so-called "heavy black holes" in the binary black hole (BBH) gravitational wave (GW) detections to date, and the role that gravitational lensing continues to play in discovering new galaxy populations, we explore the possibility that the GWs are strongly-lensed by massive galaxy clusters. For example, if one of the GW sources were actually located at $z=1$, then the rest-frame mass of the associated BHs would be reduced by a factor $\sim2$. Based on the known populations of BBH GW sources and strong-lensing clusters, we estimate a conservative lower limit on the number of BBH mergers detected per detector year at LIGO/Virgo's current sensitivity that are multiply-imaged, of $R_{\rm detect}\simeq10^{-5}{\rm yr}^{-1}$. This is equivalent to rejecting the hypothesis that one of the BBH GWs detected to date was multiply-imaged at $<\sim4\sigma$. It is therefore unlikely but not impossible that one of the GWs is multiply-imaged. We identify three spectroscopically confirmed strong-lensing clusters with well constrained mass models within the $90\%$ credible sky localisations of the BBH GWs from LIGO's first observing run. In the event that one of these clusters multiply-imaged one of the BBH GWs, we predict that $20-60\%$ of the putative next appearances of the GWs would be detectable by LIGO, and that they would arrive at Earth within three years of first detection.
  • We report direct evidence of pre-processing of the galaxies residing in galaxy groups falling into galaxy clusters drawn from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). 34 groups have been identified via their X-ray emission in the infall regions of 23 massive ($\rm \langle M_{200}\rangle = 10^{15}\,M_{\odot}$) clusters at $0.15<z<0.3$. Highly complete spectroscopic coverage combined with 24 $\rm\mu$m imaging from Spitzer allows us to make a consistent and robust selection of cluster and group members including star forming galaxies down to a stellar mass limit of $\rm M_{\star} = 2\times10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. The fraction $\rm f_{SF}$ of star forming galaxies in infalling groups is lower and with a flatter trend with respect to clustercentric radius when compared to the rest of the cluster galaxy population. At $\rm R\approx1.3\,r_{200}$ the fraction of star forming galaxies in infalling groups is half that in the cluster galaxy population. This is direct evidence that star formation quenching is effective in galaxies already prior to them settling in the cluster potential, and that groups are favourable locations for this process.
  • We study a sample of 19 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.15<z<0.30$ with highly complete spectroscopic membership catalogues (to $K < K^{\ast}(\rm z)+1.5$) from the Arizona Cluster Redshift Survey (ACReS); individual weak-lensing masses and near-infrared data from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS); and optical photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We fit the scaling relations between total cluster luminosity in each of six bandpasses (${\it grizJK}$) and cluster mass, finding cluster luminosity to be a promising mass proxy with low intrinsic scatter $\sigma_{\ln L|M}$ of only $\sim 10-20$ per cent for all relations. At fixed overdensity radius, the intercept increases with wavelength, consistent with an old stellar population. The scatter and slope are consistent across all wavelengths, suggesting that cluster colour is not a function of mass. Comparing colour with indicators of the level of disturbance in the cluster, we find a narrower variety in the cluster colours of 'disturbed' clusters than of 'undisturbed' clusters. This trend is more pronounced with indicators sensitive to the initial stages of a cluster merger, e.g. the Dressler Schectman statistic. We interpret this as possible evidence that the total cluster star formation rate is 'standardised' in mergers, perhaps through a process such as a system-wide shock in the intracluster medium.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will enable revolutionary studies of galaxies, dark matter, and black holes over cosmic time. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration has identified a host of preparatory research tasks required to leverage fully the LSST dataset for extragalactic science beyond the study of dark energy. This Galaxies Science Roadmap provides a brief introduction to critical extragalactic science to be conducted ahead of LSST operations, and a detailed list of preparatory science tasks including the motivation, activities, and deliverables associated with each. The Galaxies Science Roadmap will serve as a guiding document for researchers interested in conducting extragalactic science in anticipation of the forthcoming LSST era.
  • Mass is a fundamental property of galaxy groups and clusters. In theory weak gravitational lensing will enable an approximately unbiased measurement of mass, but parametric methods for extracting cluster masses from data require the additional knowledge of concentration. Measurements of both mass and concentration are limited by the degeneracy between the two parameters, particularly in low mass, high redshift systems where the signal-to-noise is low. In this paper we develop a hierarchical model of mass and concentration for mass inference we test our method on toy data and then apply it to a sample of galaxy groups and poor clusters down to masses of $\sim$ 1e13 M$_\odot$. Our fit and model gives a relationship among masses, concentrations and redshift that allow prediction of these parameters from incomplete and noisy future measurements. Additionally the underlying population can be used to infer an observationally based concentration-mass relation. Our method is equivalent to a quasi- stacking approach with the degree of stacking set by the data. We also demonstrate that mass and concentration derived from pure stacking can be offset from the population mean with differing values depending on the method of stacking.
  • In a hierarchical Universe clusters grow via the accretion of galaxies from the field, groups and even other clusters. As this happens, galaxies can lose their gas reservoirs via different mechanisms, eventually quenching their star-formation. We explore the diverse environmental histories of galaxies through a multi-wavelength study of the combined effect of ram-pressure stripping and group "processing" in Abell 963, a massive growing cluster at $z=0.2$ from the Blind Ultra Deep HI Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We incorporate hundreds of new optical redshifts (giving a total of 566 cluster members), as well as Subaru and XMM-Newton data from LoCuSS, to identify substructures and evaluate galaxy morphology, star-formation activity, and HI content (via HI deficiencies and stacking) out to $3\times R_{200}$. We find that Abell 963 is being fed by at least 7 groups, that contribute to the large number of passive galaxies outside the cluster core. More massive groups have a higher fraction of passive and HI-poor galaxies, while low-mass groups host younger (often interacting) galaxies. For cluster galaxies not associated with groups we corroborate our previous finding that HI gas (if any) is significantly stripped via ram-pressure during their first passage through the intra-cluster medium, and find mild evidence for a starburst associated with this event. In addition, we find an overabundance of morphologically peculiar and/or star-forming galaxies near the cluster core. We speculate that these arise as groups pass through the cluster (post-processing). Our study highlights the importance of environmental quenching and the complexity added by evolving environments.
  • The XXL survey is the largest survey carried out by XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50deg$^2$, the survey contains $\sim450$ galaxy clusters out to a redshift $\sim$2 and to an X-ray flux limit of $\sim5\times10^{-15}erg\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}$. This paper is part of the first release of XXL results focussed on the bright cluster sample. We investigate the scaling relation between weak-lensing mass and X-ray temperature for the brightest clusters in XXL. The scaling relation is used to estimate the mass of all 100 clusters in XXL-100-GC. Based on a subsample of 38 objects that lie within the intersection of the northern XXL field and the publicly available CFHTLenS catalog, we derive the $M_{WL}$ of each system with careful considerations of the systematics. The clusters lie at $0.1<z<0.6$ and span a range of $ T\simeq1-5keV$. We combine our sample with 58 clusters from the literature, increasing the range out to 10keV. To date, this is the largest sample of clusters with $M_{WL}$ measurements that has been used to study the mass-temperature relation. The fit ($M\propto T^b$) to the XXL clusters returns a slope $b=1.78^{+0.37}_{-0.32}$ and intrinsic scatter $\sigma_{\ln M|T}\simeq0.53$; the scatter is dominated by disturbed clusters. The fit to the combined sample of 96 clusters is in tension with self-similarity, $b=1.67\pm0.12$ and $\sigma_{\ln M|T}\simeq0.41$. Overall our results demonstrate the feasibility of ground-based weak-lensing scaling relation studies down to cool systems of $\sim1keV$ temperature and highlight that the current data and samples are a limit to our statistical precision. As such we are unable to determine whether the validity of hydrostatic equilibrium is a function of halo mass. An enlarged sample of cool systems, deeper weak-lensing data, and robust modelling of the selection function will help to explore these issues further.
  • Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to combine both sets of photometric redshifts to select a population of blue galaxies based purely on photometric analysis. This sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies. We also show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ~10-30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.
  • The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
  • We present the first scaling relation between weak-lensing galaxy cluster mass, $M_{WL}$, and near-infrared luminosity, $L_K$. Our results are based on 17 clusters observed with wide-field instruments on Subaru, the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, the Mayall Telescope, and the MMT. We concentrate on the relation between projected 2D weak-lensing mass and spectroscopically confirmed luminosity within 1Mpc, modelled as $M_{WL} \propto L_{K}^b$, obtaining a power law slope of $b=0.83^{+0.27}_{-0.24}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $\sigma_{lnM_{WL}|L_{K}}=10^{+8}_{-5}\%$. Intrinsic scatter of ~10% is a consistent feature of our results regardless of how we modify our approach to measuring the relationship between mass and light. For example, deprojecting the mass and measuring both quantities within $r_{500}$, that is itself obtained from the lensing analysis, yields $\sigma_{lnM_{WL}|L_{K}}=10^{+7}_{-5}\%$ and $b=0.97^{+0.17}_{-0.17}$. We also find that selecting members based on their (J-K) colours instead of spectroscopic redshifts neither increases the scatter nor modifies the slope. Overall our results indicate that near-infrared luminosity measured on scales comparable with $r_{500}$ (typically 1Mpc for our sample) is a low scatter and relatively inexpensive proxy for weak-lensing mass. Near-infrared luminosity may therefore be a useful mass proxy for cluster cosmology experiments.
  • We present a consistent analysis of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of an approximately mass-selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at $0.15<z<0.3$ -- the "LoCuSS High-$L_X$ Sample". We apply the same analysis methods to data from both satellites, including newly developed analytic background models that predict the spatial variation of the Chandra and XMM-Newton backgrounds to $<2\%$ and $<5\%$ precision respectively. To verify the cross-calibration of Chandra and XMM-Newton-based cluster mass measurements, we derive the mass profiles of the 21 clusters that have been observed with both satellites, extracting surface brightness and temperature profiles from identical regions of the respective datasets. We obtain consistent results for the gas and total hydrostatic cluster masses: the average ratio of Chandra- to XMM-Newton-based measurements of $M_{\rm gas}$ and $M_X$ at $r_{500}$ are $0.99\pm0.02$ and $1.02\pm0.05$, respectively with an intrinsic scatter of $\sim3\%$ for gas masses and $\sim8\%$ for hydrostatic masses. Comparison of our hydrostatic mass measurements at $r_{500}$ with the latest LoCuSS weak-lensing results indicate that the data are consistent with non-thermal pressure support at this radius of $\sim7\%$. We also investigate the scaling relation between our hydrostatic cluster masses and published integrated Compton parameter $Y_{sph}$ measurements from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array. We measure a scatter in mass at fixed $Y_{sph}$ of $\sim16\%$ at $\Delta=500$, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of $\sim10-15\%$ scatter.
  • We present a morphological study of 35 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15<z<0.3, selected in a similar manner to the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS), for which deep XMM-Newton observations are available. We characterise the structure of the X-ray surface brightness distribution of each cluster by measuring both their power ratios and centroid shift, and thus rank the clusters by the degree of substructure. These complementary probes give a consistent description of the cluster morphologies with some well understood exceptions. We find a remarkably tight correlation of regular morphology with the occurrence of cool cores in clusters. We also compare our measurements of X-ray morphology with measurements of the luminosity gap statistics and ellipticity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We check how our new X-ray morphological analysis maps onto cluster scaling relations, finding that (i) clusters with relatively undisturbed X-ray morphologies are on average more luminous at fixed X-ray temperature than those with disturbed morphologies, and (ii) disturbed clusters have larger X-ray masses than regular clusters for a given temperature in the M-T relation. We also show that the scatter in the ratio of X-ray and weak lensing based cluster mass measurements is larger for disturbed clusters than for those of more regular morphology. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of assembling a self-consistent picture of the physical structure of clusters from X-ray and optical data, and the potential to apply this in the measurement of cosmological cluster scaling relations.
  • We present the first weak-lensing-based scaling relation between galaxy cluster mass, M_wl, and integrated Compton parameter Y_sph. Observations of 18 galaxy clusters at z~0.2 were obtained with the Subaru 8.2-m telescope and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array. The M_wl-Y_sph scaling relations, measured at Delta=500, 1000, and 2500 rho_c, are consistent in slope and normalization with previous results derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We find an intrinsic scatter in M_wl at fixed Y_sph of 20%, larger than both previous measurements of M_HSE-Y_sph scatter as well as the scatter in true mass at fixed Y_sph found in simulations. Moreover, the scatter in our lensing-based scaling relations is morphology dependent, with 30-40% larger M_wl for undisturbed compared to disturbed clusters at the same Y_sph at r_500. Further examination suggests that the segregation may be explained by the inability of our spherical lens models to faithfully describe the three-dimensional structure of the clusters, in particular, the structure along the line-of-sight. We find that the ellipticity of the brightest cluster galaxy, a proxy for halo orientation, correlates well with the offset in mass from the mean scaling relation, which supports this picture. This provides empirical evidence that line-of-sight projection effects are an important systematic uncertainty in lensing-based scaling relations.
  • We present the results of Suzaku X-ray follow-up observation of weak-lensing-detected halos in the field around galaxy cluster ZwCl0823.2+0425. We clearly detected X-ray emission associated with most of these halos and determined their detailed physical parameters such as X-ray luminosity, temperature, and metal abundance, for the first time. We find that the X-ray luminosity - temperature relation for these halos agrees with former typical results. With mass determined from the weak gravitational lensing data, the mass-temperature relation for them is also investigated and found to be consistent with the prediction from a simple self-similar model and results of the previous studies with both lensing and X-ray data. We would like to emphasize that the self-similar scaling relation of mass and temperature is shown here for the first time using a weak-lensing selected sample, whereas previous studies of the mass scaling relation used X-ray-selected samples of clusters. Therefore, our study demonstrates importance of X-ray follow-up observations of shear-selected clusters, and shows that a joint X-ray and lensing analysis will be crucial for clusters discovered by the forthcoming weak-lensing surveys, such as the one planned with Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam.
  • We present panoramic Spitzer/MIPS mid- and far-infrared and GALEX ultraviolet imaging of the the most massive and dynamically active system in the local Universe, the Shapley supercluster at z=0.048, covering the 5 clusters which make up the supercluster core. We combine these data with existing spectroscopic data from 814 confirmed supercluster members to produce the first study of a local rich cluster including both ultraviolet and infrared luminosity functions (LFs). This joint analysis allows us to produce a complete census of star-formation (both obscured and unobscured), extending down to SFRs~0.02-0.05Msun/yr, and quantify the level of obscuration of star formation among cluster galaxies, providing a local benchmark for comparison to ongoing and future studies of cluster galaxies at higher redshifts with Spitzer and Herschel. The GALEX NUV and FUV LFs obtained have steeper faint-end slopes than the local field population, due largely to the contribution of massive, quiescent galaxies at M_FUV>-16. The 24um and 70um galaxy LFs for the Shapley supercluster instead have shapes fully consistent with those obtained for the Coma cluster and for the local field galaxy population. This apparent lack of environmental dependence for the shape of the FIR luminosity function suggests that the bulk of the star-forming galaxies that make up the observed cluster infrared LF have been recently accreted from the field and have yet to have their star formation activity significantly affected by the cluster environment. We estimate a global SFR of 327 Msun/yr over the whole supercluster core, of which just ~20% is visible directly in the UV continuum and ~80% is reprocessed by dust and emitted in the infrared. The level of obscuration (L_IR/L_FUV) in star-forming galaxies is seen to increase linearly with L_K over two orders of magnitude in stellar mass.
  • We present a joint analysis of panoramic Spitzer/MIPS mid-infrared and GALEX ultraviolet imaging of the Shapley supercluster at z=0.048. Combining this with spectra of 814 supercluster members and 1.4GHz radio continuum maps, this represents the largest complete census of star-formation (both obscured and unobscured) in local cluster galaxies to date, reaching SFRs~0.02Msun/yr. We take advantage of this comprehensive panchromatic dataset to perform a detailed analysis of the nature of star formation in cluster galaxies, using several quite independent diagnostics of the quantity and intensity of star formation to develop a coherent view of the types of star formation within cluster galaxies. We observe a robust bimodality in the infrared (f_24/f_K) galaxy colours, which we are able to identify as another manifestation of the broad split into star-forming spiral and passive elliptical galaxy populations seen in UV-optical surveys. This diagnostic also allows the identification of galaxies in the process of having their star formation quenched as the infrared analogue to the UV "green valley" population. The bulk of supercluster galaxies on the star-forming sequence have specific-SFRs consistent with local field specific-SFR-M* relations, and form a tight FIR-radio correlation confirming that their FIR emission is due to star formation. We show that 85% of the global SFR is quiescent star formation within spiral disks, as manifest by the observed sequence in the IRX-beta relation being significantly offset from the starburst relation of Kong et al. (2004), while their FIR-radio colours indicate dust heated by low-intensity star formation. Just 15% of the global SFR is due to nuclear starbursts. The vast majority of star formation seen in cluster galaxies comes from normal infalling spirals who have yet to be affected by the cluster environment.
  • We present a joint weak-lensing/X-ray study of galaxy cluster mass-observable scaling relations, motivated by the critical importance of accurate calibration of mass proxies for future X-ray missions, including eROSITA. We use a sample of 12 clusters at z\simeq0.2 that we have observed with Subaru and XMM-Newton to construct relationships between the weak-lensing mass (M), and three X-ray observables: gas temperature (T), gas mass (Mgas), and quasi-integrated gas pressure (Yx) at overdensities of \Delta=2500, 1000, and 500 with respect to the critical density. We find that Mgas at \Delta\le1000 appears to be the most promising mass proxy of the three, because it has the lowest intrinsic scatter in mass at fixed observable: \sigma_lnM\simeq0.1, independent of cluster dynamical state. The scatter in mass at fixed T and Yx is a factor of \sim2-3 larger than at fixed Mgas, which are indicative of the structural segregation that we find in the M-T and M-Yx relationships. Undisturbed clusters are found to be \sim40% and \sim20% more massive than disturbed clusters at fixed T and Yx respectively at \sim2\sigma significance. In particular, A1914 - a well-known merging cluster - significantly increases the scatter and lowers the the normalization of the relation for disturbed clusters. We also investigated the covariance between intrinsic scatter in M-Mgas and M-T relations, finding that they are positively correlated. This contradicts the adaptive mesh refinement simulations that motivated the idea that Yx may be a low scatter mass proxy, and agrees with more recent smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations based on the Millennium Simulation. We also propose a method to identify a robust mass proxy based on principal component analysis. The statistical precision of our results are limited by the small sample size and the presence of the extreme merging cluster in our sample.
  • We study the luminosity gap, dm12, between the first and second ranked galaxies in a sample of 59 massive galaxy clusters, using data from the Hale Telescope, HST, Chandra, and Spitzer. We find that the dm12 distribution, p(dm12), is a declining function of dm12, to which we fitted a straight line: p(dm12) propto -(0.13+/-0.02)dm12. The fraction of clusters with "large" luminosity gaps is p(dm12>=1)=0.37+/-0.08, which represents a 3sigma excess over that obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of a Schechter function that matches the mean cluster galaxy luminosity function. We also identify four clusters with "extreme" luminosity gaps, dm12>=2, giving a fraction of p(dm12>=2)=0.07+0.05-0.03. More generally, large luminosity gap clusters are relatively homogeneous, with elliptical/disky brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), cuspy gas density profiles (i.e. strong cool cores), high concentrations, and low substructure fractions. In contrast, small luminosity gap clusters are heterogeneous, spanning the full range of boxy/elliptical/disky BCG morphologies, the full range of cool core strengths and dark matter concentrations, and have large substructure fractions. Taken together, these results imply that the amplitude of the luminosity gap is a function of both the formation epoch, and the recent infall history of the cluster. "BCG dominance" is therefore a phase that a cluster may evolve through, and is not an evolutionary "cul-de-sac". We also compare our results with semi-analytic model predictions based on the Millennium Simulation. None of the models are able to reproduce all of the observational results, underlining the inability of current models to match the empirical properties of BCGs. We identify the strength of AGN feedback and the efficiency with which cluster galaxies are replenished after they merge with the BCG in each model as possible causes of these discrepancies. [Abridged]
  • We present new measurements of dark matter distributions in 25 X-ray luminous clusters by making a full use of the two-dimensional (2D) weak lensing signals obtained from high-quality Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging data. Our approach to directly compare the measured lensing shear pattern with elliptical model predictions allows us to extract new information on the mass distributions of individual clusters, such as the halo ellipticity and mass centroid. We find that these parameters on the cluster shape are little degenerate with cluster mass and concentration parameters. By combining the 2D fitting results for a subsample of 18 clusters, the elliptical shape of dark matter haloes is detected at 7\sigma significance level. The mean ellipticity is found to be e = 0.46 \pm 0.04 (1\sigma), which is in excellent agreement with the standard collisionless CDM model prediction. The mass centroid can be constrained with a typical accuracy of ~20" (~50 kpc/h) in radius for each cluster with some significant outliers, enabling to assess one of the most important systematic errors inherent in the stacked cluster weak lensing technique, the mass centroid uncertainty. In addition, the shape of the dark mass distribution is found to be only weakly correlated with that of the member galaxy distribution. We carefully examine possible sources of systematic errors in our measurements, finding none of them to be significant. Our results demonstrate the power of high-quality imaging data for exploring the detailed spatial distribution of dark matter (Abridged).
  • We compare X-ray hydrostatic and weak-lensing mass estimates for a sample of 12 clusters that have been observed with both XMM-Newton and Subaru. At an over-density of \Delta=500, we obtain 1-M^{X}/M^{WL}=0.01+/-0.07 for the whole sample. We also divided the sample into undisturbed and disturbed sub-samples based on quantitative X-ray morphologies using asymmetry and fluctuation parameters, obtaining 1-M^{X}/M^{WL}=0.09+/-0.06 and -0.06+/-0.12 for the undisturbed and disturbed clusters, respectively. In addition to non-thermal pressure support, there may be a competing effect associated with adiabatic compression and/or shock heating which leads to overestimate of X-ray hydrostatic masses for disturbed clusters, for example, in the famous merging cluster A1914. Despite the modest statistical significance of the mass discrepancy, on average, in the undisturbed clusters, we detect a clear trend of improving agreement between M^{X} and M^{WL} as a function of increasing over-density, M^{X}/M^{WL}=(0.908+/-0.004)+(0.187+/-0.010) \log_{10}(\Delta /500). We also examine the gas mass fractions, f_{gas}=M^{gas}/M^{WL}, finding that they are an increasing function of cluster radius, with no dependence on dynamical state, in agreement with predictions from numerical simulations. Overall, our results demonstrate that XMM-Newton and Subaru are a powerful combination for calibrating systematic uncertainties in cluster mass measurements.
  • We present Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of MACSJ1149.5+2223, an X-ray luminous galaxy cluster at z=0.544 discovered by the Massive Cluster Survey. The data reveal at least seven multiply-imaged galaxies, three of which we have confirmed spectroscopically. One of these is a spectacular face-on spiral galaxy at z=1.491, the four images of which are gravitationally magnified by ~8<mu<~23. We identify this as an L* (M_B=-20.7), disk-dominated (B/T<~0.5) galaxy, forming stars at ~6Msol/yr. We use a robust sample of multiply-imaged galaxies to constrain a parameterized model of the cluster mass distribution. In addition to the main cluster dark matter halo and the bright cluster galaxies, our best model includes three galaxy-group-sized halos. The relative probability of this model is P(N_halo=4)/P(N_halo<4)>=10^12 where N_halo is the number of cluster/group-scale halos. In terms of sheer number of merging cluster/group-scale components, this is the most complex strong-lensing cluster core studied to date. The total cluster mass and fraction of that mass associated with substructures within R<=500kpc, are measured to be M_tot=(6.7+/-0.4)x10^14Msol and f_sub=0.25+/-0.12 respectively. Our model also rules out recent claims of a flat density profile at >~7sigma confidence, thus highlighting the critical importance of spectroscopic redshifts of multiply-imaged galaxies when modeling strong lensing clusters. Overall our results attest to the efficiency of X-ray selection in finding the most powerful cluster lenses, including complicated merging systems.
  • CFHTLS optical photometry has been used to study the galaxy luminosity functions of 14 X-ray selected clusters from the XMM-LSS survey. These are mostly groups and poor clusters, with masses (M_{500}) in the range 0.6 to 19x10 ^{13} M_solar and redshifts 0.05-0.61. Hence these are some of the highest redshift X-ray selected groups to have been studied. Lower and upper colour cuts were used to determine cluster members. We derive individual luminosity functions (LFs) for all clusters as well as redshift-stacked and temperature-stacked LFs in three filters, g', r' and z', down to M=-14.5. All LFs were fitted by Schechter functions which constrained the faint-end slope, alpha, but did not always fit well to the bright end. Derived values of alpha ranged from -1.03 to as steep as -2.1. We find no evidence for upturns at faint magnitudes. Evolution in alpha was apparent in all bands: it becomes shallower with increasing redshift; for example, in the z' band it flattened from -1.75 at low redshift to -1.22 in the redshift range z=0.43-0.61. Eight of our systems lie at z~0.3, and we combine these to generate a galaxy LF in three colours for X-ray selected groups and poor clusters at redshift 0.3. We find that at z~0.3 alpha is steeper (-1.67) in the green (g') band than it is (-1.30) in the red (z') band. This colour trend disappears at low redshift, which we attribute to reddening of faint blue galaxies from z~0.3 to z~0. We also calculated the total optical luminosity and found it to correlate strongly with X-ray luminosity (L_X proportional to L_OPT^(2.1)), and also with ICM temperature (L_OPT proportional to T^(1.62)), consistent with expectations for self-similar clusters with constant mass-to-light ratio. We did not find any convincing correlation of Schechter parameters with mean cluster temperature.
  • We study the distribution of projected offsets between the cluster X-ray centroid and the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) for 65 X-ray selected clusters from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS), with a median redshift of z=0.23. We find a clear correlation between X-ray/BCG projected offset and the logarithmic slope of the cluster gas density profile at 0.04r500 (alpha), implying that more dynamically disturbed clusters have weaker cool cores. Furthermore, there is a close correspondence between the activity of the BCG, in terms of detected H_alpha and radio emission, and the X-ray/BCG offset, with the line emitting galaxies all residing in clusters with X-ray/BCG offsets of <~15 kpc. Of the BCGs with alpha < -0.85 and an offset < 0.02r500, 96 per cent (23/24) have optical emission and 88 per cent (21/24) are radio active, while none has optical emission outside these criteria. We also study the cluster gas fraction (fgas) within r500 and find a significant correlation with X-ray/BCG projected offset. The mean fgas of the `small offset' clusters (< 0.02r500) is 0.106+/-0.005 (sigma=0.03) compared to 0.145+/-0.009 (sigma=0.04) for those with an offset > 0.02r500, indicating that the total mass may be systematically underestimated in clusters with larger X-ray/BCG offsets. Our results imply a link between cool core strength and cluster dynamical state consistent with the view that cluster mergers can significantly perturb cool cores, and set new constraints on models of the evolution of the intracluster medium.
  • We present the results of deep spectroscopy for the central region of the cluster lens SDSS J1004+4112 with the Subaru telescope. A secure detection of an emission line of the faint blue stellar object (component E) near the center of the brightest cluster galaxy (G1) confirms that it is the central fifth image of the lensed quasar system. In addition, we measure the stellar velocity dispersion of G1 to be sigma_* = 352+-13 km/s. We combine these results to obtain constraints on the mass M_BH of the putative black hole (BH) at the center of the inactive galaxy G1, and hence on the M_BH-sigma_* relation at the lens redshift z_l=0.68. From detailed mass modeling, we place an upper limit on the black hole mass, M_BH < 2.1x10^{10}M_sun at 1-sigma level (<3.1x10^{10}M_sun at 3-sigma), which is consistent with black hole masses expected from the local and redshift-evolved M_BH-sigma_* relations, M_BH~10^{9}-10^{10}M_sun.
  • We use semi-analytic models of structure formation to interpret gravitational lensing measurements of substructure in galaxy cluster cores (R<=250kpc/h) at z=0.2. The dynamic range of the lensing-based substructure fraction measurements is well matched to the theoretical predictions, both spanning f_sub~0.05-0.65. The structure formation model predicts that f_sub is correlated with cluster assembly history. We use simple fitting formulae to parameterize the predicted correlations: Delta_90 = tau_90 + alpha_90 * log(f_sub) and Delta_50 = tau_50 + alpha_50 * log(f_sub), where Delta_90 and Delta_50 are the predicted lookback times from z=0.2 to when each theoretical cluster had acquired 90% and 50% respectively of the mass it had at z=0.2. The best-fit parameter values are: alpha_90 = (-1.34+/-0.79)Gyr, tau_90 = (0.31+/-0.56)Gyr and alpha_50 = (-2.77+/-1.66)Gyr, tau_50 = (0.99+/-1.18)Gyr. Therefore (i) observed clusters with f_sub<~0.1 (e.g. A383, A1835) are interpreted, on average, to have formed at z>~0.8 and to have suffered <=10% mass growth since z~0.4, (ii) observed clusters with f_sub>~0.4 (e.g. A68, A773) are interpreted as, on average, forming since z~0.4 and suffering >10% mass growth in the ~500Myr preceding z=0.2, i.e. since z=0.25. In summary, observational measurements of f_sub can be combined with structure formation models to estimate the age and assembly history of observed clusters. The ability to ``age-date'' approximately clusters in this way has numerous applications to the large clusters samples that are becoming available.