• It has recently been discovered that some, if not all, classical novae emit GeV gamma rays during outburst, but the mechanisms involved in the production of the gamma rays are still not well understood. We present here a comprehensive multi-wavelength dataset---from radio to X-rays---for the most gamma-ray luminous classical nova to-date, V1324 Sco. Using this dataset, we show that V1324 Sco is a canonical dusty Fe-II type nova, with a maximum ejecta velocity of 2600 km s$^{-1}$ and an ejecta mass of few $\times 10^{-5}$ M$_{\odot}$. There is also evidence for complex shock interactions, including a double-peaked radio light curve which shows high brightness temperatures at early times. To explore why V1324~Sco was so gamma-ray luminous, we present a model of the nova ejecta featuring strong internal shocks, and find that higher gamma-ray luminosities result from higher ejecta velocities and/or mass-loss rates. Comparison of V1324~Sco with other gamma-ray detected novae does not show clear signatures of either, and we conclude that a larger sample of similarly well-observed novae is needed to understand the origin and variation of gamma rays in novae.
  • Radio astronomy observatories with high throughput back end instruments require real-time data processing. While computing hardware continues to advance rapidly, development of real-time processing pipelines remains difficult and time-consuming, which can limit scientific productivity. Motivated by this, we have developed Bifrost: an open-source software framework for rapid pipeline development. Bifrost combines a high-level Python interface with highly efficient reconfigurable data transport and a library of computing blocks for CPU and GPU processing. The framework is generalizable, but initially it emphasizes the needs of high-throughput radio astronomy pipelines, such as the ability to process data buffers as if they were continuous streams, the capacity to partition processing into distinct data sequences (e.g., separate observations), and the ability to extract specific intervals from buffered data. Computing blocks in the library are designed for applications such as interferometry, pulsar dedispersion and timing, and transient search pipelines. We describe the design and implementation of the Bifrost framework and demonstrate its use as the backbone in the correlation and beamforming back end of the Long Wavelength Array station in the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, NM.
  • We present a survey of the radio sky accessible from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). Images are presented at nine frequencies between 35 and 80 MHz with spatial resolutions ranging from $4.7^\circ$ to $2.0^\circ$, respectively. The maps cover the sky north of a declination of $-40^\circ$ and represent the most modern systematic survey of the diffuse Galactic emission within this frequency range. We also combine our survey with other low frequency sky maps to create an updated model of the low frequency sky. Due to the low frequencies probed by our survey, the updated model better accounts for the effects of free-free absorption from Galactic ionized Hydrogen. A longer term motivation behind this survey is to understand the foreground emission that obscures the redshifted 21 cm transition of neutral hydrogen from the cosmic dark ages ($z>10$) and, at higher frequencies, the epoch of reionization ($z>6$).
  • We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of gravitational waves and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, LOFAR and MWA. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a $\usim 30$ second time window and $\usim 200 \mendash 500 \punits{deg}^{2}$ sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a \emph{prompt} radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of $\usim 2$. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.
  • We report the detection of giant pulse emission from PSR B0950+08 in 24 hours of observations made at 39.4 MHz, with a bandwidth of 16 MHz, using the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, LWA1. We detected 119 giant pulses from PSR B0950+08 (at its dispersion measure), which we define as having SNRs at least 10 times larger than for the mean pulse in our data set. These 119 pulses are 0.035% of the total number of pulse periods in the 24 hours of observations. The rate of giant pulses is about 5.0 per hour. The cumulative distribution of pulse strength $S$ is a steep power law, $N(>S)\propto S^{-4.7}$, but much less steep than would be expected if we were observing the tail of a Gaussian distribution of normal pulses. We detected no other transient pulses in a dispersion measure range from 1 to 90 pc cm$^{-3}$, in the beam tracking PSR B0950+08. The giant pulses have a narrower temporal width than the mean pulse (17.8 ms, on average, vs. 30.5 ms). The pulse widths are consistent with a previously observed weak dependence on observing frequency, which may be indicative of a deviation from a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density irregularities along the line of sight. The rate and strength of these giant pulses is less than has been observed at $\sim$100 MHz. Additionally, the mean (normal) pulse flux density we observed is less than at $\sim$100 MHz. These results suggest this pulsar is weaker and produces less frequent giant pulses at 39 MHz than at 100 MHz.
  • We present the results of an all-sky radio survey between 5 and 9 GHz of the fields surrounding all unassociated gamma-ray objects listed in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog (2FGL). The goal of these observations is to find all new gamma-ray AGN associations with radio sources >10 mJy at 8 GHz. We observed with the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array the areas around unassociated sources, providing localizations of weak radio point sources found in 2FGL fields at arcmin scales. Then we followed-up a subset of those with the Very Long Baseline and the Long Baseline Arrays to confirm detections of radio emission on parsec-scales. We quantified association probabilities based on known statistics of source counts and assuming a uniform distribution of background sources. In total we found 865 radio sources at arcsec scales as candidates for association and detected 95 of 170 selected for follow-up observations at milliarcsecond resolution. Based on this we obtained firm associations for 76 previously unknown gamma-ray AGN. Comparison of these new AGN associations with the predictions from using the WISE color-color diagram shows that half of the associations are missed. We found that 129 out of 588 observed gamma-ray sources at arcmin scales not a single radio continuum source was detected above our sensitivity limit within the 3-sigma gamma-ray localization. These "empty" fields were found to be particularly concentrated at low Galactic latitudes. The nature of these Galactic gamma-ray emitters is not yet determined.
  • Classical novae are the most common astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars accreting gas from companions in binary star systems. Novae typically expel ~10^(-4) solar masses of material at velocities exceeding 1,000 kilometres per second. However, the mechanism of mass ejection in novae is poorly understood, and could be dominated by the impulsive flash of thermonuclear energy, prolonged optically thick winds, or binary interaction with the nova envelope. Classical novae are now routinely detected in gigaelectronvolt gamma-ray wavelengths, suggesting that relativistic particles are accelerated by strong shocks in the ejecta. Here we report high-resolution radio imaging of the gamma-ray-emitting nova V959 Mon. We find that its ejecta were shaped by the motion of the binary system: some gas was expelled rapidly along the poles as a wind from the white dwarf, while denser material drifted out along the equatorial plane, propelled by orbital motion. At the interface between the equatorial and polar regions, we observe synchrotron emission indicative of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration, thereby pinpointing the location of gamma-ray production. Binary shaping of the nova ejecta and associated internal shocks are expected to be widespread among novae, explaining why many novae are gamma-ray emitters.
  • We present results from our analysis of Chandra X-ray Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) images of the Crab Nebula that were contemporaneous with the gamma-ray flare of 2011 April. Despite hints in the X-ray data, we find no evidence for statistically significant variations that pinpoint the specific location of the flares within the Nebula. The Keck observations extend this conclusion to the "inner knot", i.e., the feature within an arcsecond of the pulsar. The VLA observations support this conclusion. We also discuss theoretical implications of the gamma-ray flares and suggest that the most dramatic gamma-ray flares are due to radiation-reaction-limited synchrotron emission associated with sudden, dissipative changes in the current system sustained by the central pulsar.
  • Observations of ten Compact Symmetric Objects ({\rm CSO}) candidates have been made with the Very Long Baseline Array at 8.4 GHz in 2005 and with a combined Chinese and European VLBI array at 8.4 GHz in 2009. The 2009 observations incorporate for the first time the two new Chinese telescopes at Miyun and Kunming for international astrophysical observations. The observational data, in combination with archival VLBA data from previous epochs, have been used to derive the proper motions of the VLBI components. Because of the long time baseline of $\sim$16 years of the VLBI data sets, the expansion velocities of the hot spots can be measured at an accuracy as high as $\sim$1.3 $\mu$as yr$^{-1}$. Six of the ten sources are identified as CSOs with a typical double or triple morphology on the basis of both spectral index maps and their mirror-symmetry of proper motions of the terminal hot spots. The compact double source J1324+4048 is also identified as a CSO candidate. Among the three remaining sources, J1756+5748 and J2312+3847 are identified as core-jet sources with proper motions of their jet components relating to systemic source expansion. The third source J0017+5312 is likely also a core-jet source, but a robust detection of a core is needed for an unambiguous identification. The kinematic ages of the CSOs derived from proper motions range from 300 to 2500 years. The kinematic age distribution of the CSOs confirm an overabundance of compact young CSOs with ages less than 500 years. CSOs with known kinematic ages may be used to study the dynamical evolution of extragalactic radio sources at early stages.
  • The radio properties of blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In total, 232 sources were observed with the VLBA. Ninety sources that were previously observed as part of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) have been included in the sample, as well as 142 sources not found in VIPS. This very large, flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) provides insights into the mechanism that produces strong gamma-ray emission. In particular, we see that gamma-ray emission is related to strong, uniform magnetic fields in the cores of the host AGN. Included in this sample are non-blazar AGN such as 3C84, M82, and NGC 6251. For the blazars, the total VLBA radio flux density at 5 GHz correlates strongly with gamma-ray flux. The LAT BL Lac objects tend to be similar to the non-LAT BL Lac objects, but the LAT flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are significantly different from the non-LAT FSRQs. Strong core polarization is significantly more common among the LAT sources, and core fractional polarization appears to increase during LAT detection.
  • Studies of the diffuse X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters have provided powerful constraints on cosmological parameters and insights into plasma astrophysics. However, measurements of the faint cluster outskirts have become possible only recently. Using data from the Suzaku X-ray telescope, we determined an accurate, spatially resolved census of the gas, metals, and dark matter out to the edge of the Perseus Cluster. Contrary to previous results, our measurements of the cluster baryon fraction are consistent with the expected universal value at half of the virial radius. The apparent baryon fraction exceeds the cosmic mean at larger radii, suggesting a clumpy distribution of the gas, which is important for understanding the ongoing growth of clusters from the surrounding cosmic web.
  • We describe a 4.85 GHz survey of bright, flat-spectrum radio sources conducted with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope in an attempt to improve the completeness of existing surveys, such as CRATES. We report the results of these observations and of follow-up 8.4 GHz observations with the VLA of a subset of the sample. We comment on the connection to the WMAP point source catalog and on the survey's effectiveness at supplementing the CRATES sky coverage.
  • We have assembled an 8.4 GHz survey of bright, flat-spectrum (alpha > -0.5) radio sources with nearly uniform extragalactic (|b|>10 deg) coverage for sources brighter than S_{4.8 GHz} = 65 mJy. The catalog is assembled from existing observations (especially CLASS and the Wright et al. PMN-CA survey), augmented by reprocessing of archival VLA and ATCA data and by new observations to fill in coverage gaps. We refer to this program as CRATES, the Combined Radio All-sky Targeted Eight GHz Survey. The resulting catalog provides precise positions, sub-arcsecond structures, and spectral indices for some 11,000 sources. We describe the morphology and spectral index distribution of the sample and comment on the survey's power to select several classes of interesting sources, especially high energy blazars. Comparison of CRATES with other high-frequency surveys also provides unique opportunities for identification of high-power radio sources.
  • The Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 has been imaged at resolution better than 0.1 pc using a VLBI array consisting of the VLBA and three 100m-class telescopes. A flat-spectrum 3-mJy source with a monochromatic radio power of ~10^{37} ergs/s has been detected, apparently at the location of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its central black hole. The radio source has a minimum brightness temperature of 2.1 x 10^8 K and a size upper limit of 0.035 pc, about 10 times the diameter of the broad-line region and 15,000 times the diameter of the black hole's event horizon. An additional flat-spectrum component located within a parsec of the apparent nucleus is likely to be a knot in the inner radio jet. The presence of some steep-spectrum radio emission within 0.1 pc of the galaxy nucleus limits the emission measure of a possible ionized torus to a maximum value of 10^8 cm^{-6}pc. If the hard X-ray source in NGC 4151 is associated with the radio AGN, its radio to X-ray ratio is less than 10^{-5}, putting NGC 4151 securely in the radio-quiet class of AGNs. The radio image reveals a 0.2 pc two-sided base to the well-known arcsecond radio jet. Apparent speeds of jet components relative to the radio AGN are <0.050c and <0.028c at respective nuclear distances of 0.16 pc and 6.8 pc. These are the lowest speed limits yet found for a Seyfert galaxy, and indicate non-relativistic jet motions, possibly due to thermal plasma, on a scale only an order of magnitude larger than the broad-line region.
  • The magnetic field structure in GRB outflows is of great interest as it can provide valuable clues that can help pin down the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of GRB jets. The most promising way of probing it is through polarization measurements of the synchrotron emission from the GRB ejecta, which includes the gamma-ray emission and the reverse shock emission. Measuring polarization in gamma-rays with current instruments is extremely difficult: so far there is only one claim of detection (in GRB 021206) which despite the favorable conditions remains very controversial. The emission from the reverse shock that propagates into the ejecta as it is decelerated by the ambient medium peaks in the optical after tens of seconds (the `optical flash') and dominates the optical emission up to about ten minutes after the GRB. Unfortunately, no polarization measurements of this optical emission have been made to date. However, after the reverse shock finishes crossing the shell of GRB ejecta, the shocked ejecta cools adiabatically and radiates at lower and lower frequencies, peaking in the radio after $\sim 1$ day (the `radio flare'). We use VLA data of radio flares from GRBs to constrain the polarization of this emission. We find only upper limits for both linear and circular polarization. Our best limits are for GRB 991216, for which we find $3\sigma$ upper limits on the linear and circular polarization of 7% and 9%, respectively. These limits provide interesting constraints on existing GRB models. Specifically, our results are hard to reconcile with a predominantly ordered toroidal magnetic field in the GRB outflow together with a `structured' jet, where the energy per solid angle drops as the inverse square of the angle from the jet axis, that is expected in models where the outflow is Poynting flux dominated.
  • We present VLA radio continuum observations at 3.6 and 6 cm of a ~0.65 sq.deg. field in the galactic plane at l=+45deg . These observations are meant to be used in a comparison with ISO observations at 7 and 15 um of the same region. In this paper we compare the radio results with other radio surveys and with the IRAS-PSC. At 3.6 and/or 6 cm we detect a total of 34 discrete sources, 13 of which are found in five separate extended complexes. These are all multiple or single extended thermal ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions. While for each of these complexes an IRAS counterpart could be reliably found, no IRAS counterpart could be reliably identified for any of the remaining 21 sources. Of these 21 compact sources, six are candidate UCHII regions, and the other 15 are most probably background extragalactic non-thermal sources. The five IRAS sources associated with the radio continuum complexes all satisfy the Wood & Churchwell (1989; WC89) color criteria for UCHII. None of the other 38 IRAS point sources present in our surveyed field show the same colors. This fraction of WC89 type to total IRAS sources is consistent with what is found over the entire galactic plane. The fact that, when observed with a compact VLA configuration, the IRAS sources with "UCHII colors" are found to be associated with arcminute-scale extended sources, rather than with compact or unresolved radio sources, may have important implications on the estimated lifetime of UCHII regions.