• Far-from equilibrium dynamics that lead to self-organization are highly relevant to complex dynamical systems not only in physics, but also in life-, earth-, and social sciences. It is challenging however to find systems with sufficiently controlled interactions that allow to model their emergent properties quantitatively. Here, we study a non-equilibrium phase transition and observe signatures of self-organized criticality in a dilute thermal vapour of atoms optically excited to strongly interacting Rydberg states. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) provides excellent control over the population dynamics and enables high-resolution probing of the driven-dissipative system, which also exhibits phase bistability. Increased sensitivity compared to previous work allows reconstruct the system's phase diagram including the observation of its critical point. We observe that interaction-induced energy shifts and enhanced decay only occur in one of the phases above a critical Rydberg population. This limits the application of generic mean-field models, however a modified, threshold-dependent approach is in qualitative agreement with experimental data. Near the transition threshold, we observe self-organization dynamics as small fluctuations are sufficient to induce a phase transition.
  • According to the geometric characterization of measurement assemblages and local hidden state (LHS) models, we propose a steering criterion which is both necessary and sufficient for two-qubit states under arbitrary measurement sets. A quantity is introduced to describe the required local resources to reconstruct a measurement assemblage for two-qubit states. We show that the quantity can be regarded as a quantification of steerability and be used to find out optimal LHS models. Finally we propose a method to generate unsteerable states, and construct some two-qubit states which are entangled but unsteerable under all projective measurements.
  • Adopting the geometric description of steering assemblages and local hidden states (LHS) model, we construct the optimal LHS model for some two-qubit states under continuous projective measurements, and obtain a sufficient steering criterion for all two-qubit states. Using the criterion, we show more two-qubit states that are asymmetric in steering scenario under projective measurements. Then we generalize the geometric description into higher dimensional bipartite cases, calculate the steering bound of two-qutrit isotropic states and make discussion on more general cases.
  • Bell nonlocality plays a fundamental role in quantum theory. Numerous tests of the Bell inequality have been reported since the ground-breaking discovery of the Bell theorem.Up to now, however, most discussions of the Bell scenario have focused on a single pair of entangled particles distributed to only two separated observers. Recently, it has been shown surprisingly that multiple observers can share the nonlocality present in a single particle from an entangled pair using the method of weak measurements [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 114}, 250401 (2015)]. Here we report an observation of double CHSH-Bell inequality violations for a single pair of entangled photons with strength continuous-tunable optimal weak measurements in photonic system for the first time. Our results not only shed new light on the interplay between nonlocality and quantum measurements but may also be significant for important applications such as unbounded randomness certification and quantum steering.
  • The large number of available orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of photons provides a unique resource for many important applications in quantum information and optical communications. However, conventional OAM switching devices usually rely on precise parameter control and are limited by slow switching rate and low efficiency. Here we propose a robust, fast and efficient photonic OAM switch device based on a topological process, where photons are adiabatically pumped to a target OAM state on demand. Such topological OAM pumping can be realized through manipulating photons in a few degenerate main cavities and involves only a limited number of optical elements. A large change of OAM at $\sim 10^{q}$ can be realized with only $q$ degenerate main cavities and at most $5q$ pumping cycles. The topological photonic OAM switch may become a powerful device for broad applications in many different fields and motivate novel topological design of conventional optical devices.
  • The Fulde-Ferrell (FF) superfluid phase, in which fermions form finite-momentum Cooper pairings, is well studied in spin-singlet superfluids in past decades. Different from previous works that engineer the FF state in spinful cold atoms, we show that the FF state can emerge in spinless Fermi gases confined in optical lattice associated with nearest-neighbor interactions. The mechanism of the spinless FF state relies on the split Fermi surfaces by tuning the chemistry potential, which naturally gives rise to finite-momentum Cooper pairings. The phase transition is accompanied by changed Chern numbers, in which, different from the conventional picture, the band gap does not close. By beyond-mean-field calculations, we find the finite-momentum pairing is more robust, yielding the system promising for maintaining the FF state at finite temperature. Finally we present the possible realization and detection scheme of the spinless FF state.
  • The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement is of special importance not only for fundamental research in quantum mechanics, but also for quantum information processing. Establishing EPR entanglement between two memory systems, such as atomic ensembles, nitrogen-vacancy centers, and rare-earth-ion-doped solids is promising for realizing spatial-multimode based quantum communication, quantum computation, and quantum imaging. To date, there have been few reports on realizing EPR entanglement between physical systems in true position and momentum. Here we describe successfully establishing such entanglement between two separated atomic ensembles by using quantum storage. We clearly prove the existence of EPR entanglement in position and momentum between two memories by demonstrating the satisfying of the inseparability criterion with the aid of quantum ghost-imaging and ghost-interference experiments.
  • Improving the precision of measurements is a significant scientific challenge. The challenge is twofold: first, overcoming noise that limits the precision given a fixed amount of a resource, N, and second, improving the scaling of precision over the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/\sqrt{N}, and ultimately reaching a Heisenberg scaling (HS), 1/N. Here we present and experimentally implement a new scheme for precision measurements. Our scheme is based on a probe in a mixed state with a large uncertainty, combined with a post-selection of an additional pure system, such that the precision of the estimated coupling strength between the probe and the system is enhanced. We performed a measurement of a single photon's Kerr non-linearity with an HS, where an ultra-small Kerr phase of around 6 *10^{-8} rad was observed with an unprecedented precision of around 3.6* 10^{-10} rad. Moreover, our scheme utilizes an imaginary weak-value, the Kerr non-linearity results in a shift of the mean photon number of the probe, and hence, the scheme is robust to noise originating from the self-phase modulation.
  • Sequential weak measurements of non-commuting observables is not only fundamentally interesting in quantum measurement but also shown potential in various applications. The previous reported methods, however, can only realize limited sequential weak measurements experimentally. In this Letter, we propose the realization of sequential measurements of arbitrary observables and experimentally demonstrate for the first time the measurement of sequential weak values of three non-commuting Pauli observables by using genuine single photons. The results presented here will not only improve our understanding of quantum measurement, e.g. testing quantum contextuality, macroscopic realism, and uncertainty relation, but also have many applications such as realizing counterfactual computation, direct process tomography, direct measurement of the density matrix and unbounded randomness certification.
  • Making a "which-way" measurement (WWM) to identify which slit a particle goes through in a double-slit apparatus will reduce the visibility of interference fringes. There has been a long-standing controversy over whether this can be attributed to an uncontrollable momentum transfer. To date, no experiment has characterised the momentum change in a way that relates quantitatively to the loss of visibility. Here, by reconstructing the Bohmian trajectories of single photons, we experimentally obtain the distribution of momentum change, which is observed to be not a momentum kick that occurs at the point of the WWM, but nonclassically accumulates during the propagation of the photons. We further confirm a quantitative relation between the loss of visibility consequent on a WWM and the total (late-time) momentum disturbance. Our results emphasize the role of the Bohmian momentum in giving an intuitive picture of wave-particle duality and complementarity.
  • We present the first experimental confirmation of the quantum-mechanical prediction of stronger-than-binary correlations. These are correlations that cannot be explained under the assumption that the occurrence of a particular outcome of an $n \ge 3$-outcome measurement is due to a two-step process in which, in the first step, some classical mechanism precludes $n-2$ of the outcomes and, in the second step, a binary measurement generates the outcome. Our experiment uses pairs of photonic qutrits distributed between two laboratories, where randomly chosen three-outcome measurements are performed. We report a violation by {9.3} standard deviations of the optimal inequality for nonsignaling binary correlations.
  • Machine learning representations of many-body quantum states have recently been introduced as an ansatz to describe the ground states and unitary evolutions of many-body quantum systems. We explore one of the most important representations, restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) representation, in stabilizer formalism. We give the general method of constructing RBM representation for stabilizer code states and find the exact RBM representation for several types of stabilizer groups with the number of hidden neurons equal or less than the number of visible neurons, which indicates that the representation is extremely efficient. Then we analyze the surface code with boundaries, defects, domain walls and twists in full detail and find that all the models can be efficiently represented via RBM ansatz states. Besides, the case for Kitaev's $D(\Zb_d)$ model, which is a generalized model of surface code, is also investigated.
  • We study the instability of a ring Bose-Einstein condensate under a periodic modulation of inter-atomic interactions. The condensate exhibits temporal and spatial patterns induced by the parametric resonance, which can be characterized by Bogoliubov quasi-particle excitations in the Floquet basis. As the ring geometry significantly limits the number of excitable Bogoliubov modes, we are able to capture the non-linear dynamics of the condensate using a three-mode model. We further demonstrate the robustness of the temporal and spatial patterns against disorder, which are attributed to the mode-locking mechanism under the ring geometry. Our results can be observed in cold atomic systems and are also relevant to physical systems described by the non-linear Schrodinger's equation.
  • We show that dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) in the quench dynamics of two-dimensional topological systems can be characterized by a dynamical topological invariant defined along an appropriately chosen closed contour in momentum space. Such a dynamical topological invariant reflects the vorticity of dynamical vortices responsible for the DQPTs, and thus serves as a dynamical topological order parameter in two dimensions. We demonstrate that when the contour crosses topologically protected fixed points in the quench dynamics, an intimate connection can be established between the dynamical topological order parameter in two dimensions and those in one dimension. We further define a reduced rate function of the Loschmidt echo on the contour, which features non-analyticities at critical times and is sufficient to characterize DQPTs in two dimensions. We illustrate our results using the Haldane honeycomb model and the quantum anomalous Hall model as concrete examples, both of which have been experimentally realized using cold atoms.
  • Collective measurements on identically prepared quantum systems can extract more information than local measurements, thereby enhancing information-processing efficiency. Although this nonclassical phenomenon has been known for two decades, it has remained a challenging task to demonstrate the advantage of collective measurements in experiments. Here we introduce a general recipe for performing deterministic collective measurements on two identically prepared qubits based on quantum walks. Using photonic quantum walks, we realize experimentally an optimized collective measurement with fidelity 0.9946 without post selection. As an application, we achieve the highest tomographic efficiency in qubit state tomography to date. Our work offers an effective recipe for beating the precision limit of local measurements in quantum state tomography and metrology. In addition, our study opens an avenue for harvesting the power of collective measurements in quantum information processing and for exploring the intriguing physics behind this power.
  • Self-testing refers to a method with which a classical user can certify the state and measurements of quantum systems in a device-independent way. Especially, the self-testing of entangled states is of great importance in quantum information process. A comprehensible example is that violating the CHSH inequality maximally necessarily implies the bipartite shares a singlet. One essential question in self-testing is that, when one observes a non-maximum violation, how close is the tested state to the target state (which maximally violates certain Bell inequality)? The answer to this question describes the robustness of the used self-testing criterion, which is highly important in a practical sense. Recently, J. Kaniewski predicts two analytic self-testing bounds for bipartite and tripartite systems. In this work, we experimentally investigate these two bounds with high quality two-qubit and three-qubit entanglement sources. The results show that these bounds are valid for various of entangled states we prepared, and thus, we implement robust self-testing processes which improve the previous results significantly.
  • Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • It is known that high intensity fields are usually required to implement shortcuts to adiabaticity via Transitionless Quantum Driving (TQD). Here, we show that this requirement can be relaxed by exploiting the gauge freedom of generalized TQD, which is expressed in terms of an arbitrary phase when mimicking the adiabatic evolution. We experimentally investigate the performance of generalized TQD in comparison with both traditional TQD and adiabatic dynamics. By using a $^{171}$Yb$^+$ trapped ion hyperfine qubit, we implement a Landau-Zener adiabatic Hamiltonian and its (traditional and generalized) TQD counterparts. We show that the generalized theory provides optimally implementable Hamiltonians for TQD, with no additional fields required. In addition, the energetically optimal TQD Hamiltonian for the Landau-Zener model is investigated under dephasing. Remarkably, even using less intense fields, optimal TQD exhibits fidelities that are more robust against a decohering environment, with performance superior than that provided by the adiabatic dynamics.
  • Topological orders and associated topological protected excitations satisfying non-Abelian statistics have been widely explored in various platforms. The $\mathbb{Z}_3$ parafermions are regarded as the most natural generation of the Majorana fermions to realize these topological orders. Here we investigate the topological phase and emergent $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin phases in an extended parafermion chain. This model exhibits rich variety of phases, including not only topological ferromagnetic phase, which supports non-Abelian anyon excitation, but also spin-fluid, dimer and chiral phases from the emergent $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin model. We generalize the measurement tools in $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin models to fully characterize these phases in the extended parafermion model and map out the corresponding phase diagram. Surprisingly, we find that all the phase boundaries finally merge to a single supercritical point. In regarding of the rather generality of emergent phenomena in parafermion models, this approach opens a wide range of intriguing applications in investigating the exotic phases in other parafermion models.
  • Weak value amplification has been applied to various small physical quantities estimation, however there still lacks a practical feasible protocol to amplify ultra-small longitudinal phase, which is of importance in high precision measurement. Very recently, a different amplification protocol within the framework of weak measurements is proposed to solve this problem, which is capable of measuring any ultra-small longitudinal phase signal that conventional interferometry tries to do. Here we experimentally demonstrate this weak measurements amplification protocol of ultra-small longitudinal phase and realize one order of magnitude amplification in the same technical condition, which verifies the validity of the protocol and show higher precision and sensitivity than conventional interferometry. Our results significantly broaden the area of applications of weak measurements and may play an important role in high precision measurements.
  • The celebrated Bell-Kochen-Specker no-go theorem asserts that quantum mechanics does not present the property of realism, the essence of the theorem is the lack of a joint probability distributions for some experiment settings. In this work, we exploit the information theoretic form of the theorem using information measure instead of probabilistic measure and indicate that quantum mechanics does not present such entropic realism neither. The entropic form of Gleason's no-disturbance principle is developed and it turns out to be characterized by the intersection of several entropic cones. Entropic contextuality and entropic nonlocality are investigated in depth in this framework. We show how one can construct monogamy relations using entropic cone and basic Shannon-type inequalities. The general criterion for several entropic tests to be monogamous is also developed, using the criterion, we demonstrate that entropic nonlocal correlations are monogamous, entropic contextuality tests are monogamous and entropic nonlocality and entropic contextuality are also monogamous. Finally, we analyze the entropic monogamy relations for multiparty and many-test case, which plays a crucial role in quantum network communication.
  • In a recent proposal [Jie and Zhang, Phys. Rev. A 95, 060701(R) (2017)], it has been shown that center-of-mass-momentum-dependent two-body interactions can be generated and tuned by Raman coupling the closed-channel bound states in a magnetic Feshbach resonance. Here we investigate the universal relations in a three-dimensional Fermi gas near such a laser modulated $s$-wave Feshbach resonance. Using the operator-product expansion approach, we find that, to fully describe the high-momentum tail of the density distribution up to $q^{-6}$ ($q$ is the relative momentum), four center-of-mass-momentum-dependent parameters are required, which we identify as contacts. These contacts appear in various universal relations connecting microscopic and thermodynamic properties. One contact is related to the variation of energy with respect to the inverse scattering length and determines the leading $q^{-4}$ tail of the high-momentum distribution. Another vector contact appears in the subleading $q^{-5}$ tail, which is related to the velocity of closed-channel molecules. The other two contacts emerge in the $q^{-6}$ tail and are respectively related to the variation of energy with respect to the range parameter and to the kinetic energy of closed-channel molecules. Particularly, we find that the $q^{-5}$ tail and part of the $q^{-6}$ tail of the momentum distribution show anisotropic features. We derive the universal relations and, as a concrete example, estimate the contacts for the zero-temperature superfluid ground state of the system using a mean-field approach.
  • Probing collective spin dynamics is a current challenge in the field of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and has important applications in material analysis and quantum information protocols. Recently, the rare-earth ion doped crystals are an attractive candidate for making long-lived quantum memory. Further enhancement of its performance would benefit from the direct knowledge on the dynamics of nuclear-spin bath in the crystal. Here we detect the collective dynamics of nuclear-spin bath located around the rare-earth ions in a crystal using dynamical decoupling spectroscopy method. From the measured spectrum, we analyze the configuration of the spin bath and characterize the flip-flop time between two correlated nuclear spins in a long time scale ($\sim $1s). Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the rare-earth ions can serve as a magnetic quantum sensor for external magnetic field. These results suggest that the rare-earth ion is a useful probe for complex spin dynamics in solids and enable quantum sensing in the low-frequency regime, revealing promising possibilities for applications in diverse fields.
  • Optical communication systems are able to send the information from one user to another in light beams that travel through the free space or optical fibers, therefore how to send larger amounts of information in smaller periods of time is a long term concern, one promising way is to use multiplexing of photon's different degrees of freedoms to parallel handle the large amounts of information in multiple channels independently. In this work, by combining the wavelength and time division multiplexing technologies, we prepare a multifrequency mode time bin entangled photon pair source at different time slots by using four wave mixing in a silicon nanowire waveguide, and distribute entangled photons into 3 time by 14 wavelength channels independently, which can significantly increase the bit rate compared with the single channel systems in quantum communication. Our work paves a new and promising way to achieve a high capacity quantum communication and to generate a multiple photon nonclassical state.
  • Classical simulations of quantum circuits are limited in both space and time when the qubit count is above 50, the realm where quantum supremacy reigns. However, recently, the barrier has been lifted to 56 by teams at Google and IBM. Here, we propose a method of simulation, achieving a 64-qubit simulation of a universal random circuit of depth 22 using a 64-node cluster, and 56- and 42-qubit circuits on a single PC. We also estimate that a 72-qubit circuit of depth 22 can be simulated in a few days on a supercomputer identical to that used by the IBM team. Moreover, the simulation processes are exceedingly separable, hence parallelizable, involving just a few inter-process communications. Our work enables simulating more qubits with less hardware, provides a new perspective regarding classical simulations, and extends the issue of quantum supremacy.