• Gradient descent method, as one of the major methods in numerical optimization, is the key ingredient in many machine learning algorithms. As one of the most fundamental way to solve the optimization problems, it promises the function value to move along the direction of steepest descent. For the vast resource consumption when dealing with high-dimensional problems, a quantum version of this iterative optimization algorithm has been proposed recently[arXiv:1612.01789]. Here, we develop this protocol and implement it on a quantum simulator with limited resource. Moreover, a prototypical experiment was shown with a 4-qubit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance quantum processor, demonstrating a optimization process of polynomial function iteratively. In each iteration, we achieved an average fidelity of 94\% compared with theoretical calculation via full-state tomography. In particular, the iterative point gradually converged to the local minimum. We apply our method to multidimensional scaling problem, further showing the potentially capability to yields an exponentially improvement compared with classical counterparts. With the onrushing tendency of quantum information, our work could provide a subroutine for the application of future practical quantum computers.
  • We experimentally simulate the spin networks -- a fundamental description of quantum spacetime at the Planck level. We achieve this by simulating quantum tetrahedra and their interactions. The tensor product of these quantum tetrahedra comprises spin networks. In this initial attempt to study quantum spacetime by quantum information processing, on a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we simulate the basic module -- comprising five quantum tetrahedra -- of the interactions of quantum spacetime. By measuring the geometric properties on the corresponding quantum tetrahedra and simulate their interactions, our experiment serves as the basic module that represents the Feynman diagram vertex in the spin-network formulation of quantum spacetime.
  • As of today, no one can tell when a universal quantum computer with thousands of logical quantum bits (qubits) will be built. At present, most quantum computer prototypes involve less than ten individually controllable qubits, and only exist in laboratories for the sake of either the great costs of devices or professional maintenance requirements. Moreover, scientists believe that quantum computers will never replace our daily, every-minute use of classical computers, but would rather serve as a substantial addition to the classical ones when tackling some particular problems. Due to the above two reasons, cloud-based quantum computing is anticipated to be the most useful and reachable form for public users to experience with the power of quantum. As initial attempts, IBM Q has launched influential cloud services on a superconducting quantum processor in 2016, but no other platforms has followed up yet. Here, we report our new cloud quantum computing service -- NMRCloudQ (http://nmrcloudq.com/zh-hans/), where nuclear magnetic resonance, one of the pioneer platforms with mature techniques in experimental quantum computing, plays as the role of implementing computing tasks. Our service provides a comprehensive software environment preconfigured with a list of quantum information processing packages, and aims to be freely accessible to either amateurs that look forward to keeping pace with this quantum era or professionals that are interested in carrying out real quantum computing experiments in person. In our current version, four qubits are already usable with in average 1.26% single-qubit gate error rate and 1.77% two-qubit controlled-NOT gate error rate via randomized benchmaking tests. Improved control precisions as well as a new seven-qubit processor are also in preparation and will be available later.
  • The quantum clock synchronization (QCS) is to measure the time difference among the spatially separated clocks with the principle of quantum mechanics. The first QCS algorithm proposed by Chuang and Jozsa is merely based on two parties, which is further extended and generalized to the multiparty situation by Krco and Paul. They present a multiparty QCS protocol based upon W states that utilizes shared prior entanglement and broadcast of classical information to synchronize spatially separated clocks. Shortly afterwards, Ben-Av and Exman came up with an optimized multiparty QCS using Z state. In this work, we firstly report an implementation of Krco and Ben-AV multiparty QCS algorithm using a four-qubit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The experimental results show a great agreement with the theory and also prove Ben-AV multiparty QCS algorithm more accurate than Krco.
  • Quantum simulation promises to have wide applications in many fields where problems are hard to model with classical computers. Various quantum devices of different platforms have been built to tackle the problems in, say, quantum chemistry, condensed matter physics, and high-energy physics. Here, we report an experiment towards the simulation of quantum gravity by simulating the holographic entanglement entropy. On a six-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we demonstrate a key result of Anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory(\adscft) correspondence---the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is demonstrated by measuring the relevant entanglement entropies on the perfect tensor state. The fidelity of our experimentally prepared the six-qubit state is 85.0\% via full state tomography and reaches 93.7\% if the signal-decay due to decoherence is taken into account. Our experiment serves as the basic module of simulating more complex tensor network states that exploring \adscft correspondence. As the initial experimental attempt to study \adscft via quantum information processing, our work opens up new avenues exploring quantum gravity phenomena on quantum simulators.
  • Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation has received increasing attention due to its robustness against control errors. However, all the previous schemes have to use at least two sequentially implemented gates to realize a general one-qubit gate. Based on two recent works, we construct two Hamiltonians and experimentally realized nonadiabatic holonomic gates by a single-shot implementation in a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Two noncommuting one-qubit holonomic gates, rotating along $\hat{x}$ and $\hat{z}$ axes respectively, are implemented by evolving a work qubit and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically following a quantum circuit designed. Using a sequence compiler developed for NMR quantum information processor, we optimize the whole pulse sequence, minimizing the total error of the implementation. Finally, all the nonadiabatic holonomic gates reach high unattenuated experimental fidelities over $98\%$
  • Photons that are entangled or correlated in orbital angular momentum have been extensively used for remote sensing, object identification and imaging. It has recently been demonstrated that intensity fluctuations give rise to the formation of correlations in the orbital angular momentum components and angular positions of random light. Here, we demonstrate that the spatial signatures and phase information of an object, with rotational symmetries, can be identified using classical orbital angular momentum correlations in random light. The Fourier components imprinted in the digital spiral spectrum of the object, measured through intensity correlations, unveil its spatial and phase information. Sharing similarities with conventional compressive sensing protocols that exploit sparsity to reduce the number of measurements required to reconstruct a signal, our technique allows sensing of an object with fewer measurements than other schemes that use pixel-by-pixel imaging. One remarkable advantage of our technique is the fact that it does not require the preparation of fragile quantum states of light and works at both low- and high-light levels. In addition, our technique is robust against environmental noise, a fundamental feature of any realistic scheme for remote sensing.
  • Topological orders can be used as media for topological quantum computing --- a promising quantum computation model due to its invulnerability against local errors. Conversely, a quantum simulator, often regarded as a quantum computing device for special purposes, also offers a way of characterizing topological orders. Here, we show how to identify distinct topological orders via measuring their modular $S$ and $T$ matrices. In particular, we employ a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator to study the properties of three topologically ordered matter phases described by the string-net model with two string types, including the $\Z_2$ toric code, doubled semion, and doubled Fibonacci. The third one, non-Abelian Fibonacci order is notably expected to be the simplest candidate for universal topological quantum computing. Our experiment serves as the basic module, built on which one can simulate braiding of non-Abelian anyons and ultimately topological quantum computation via the braiding, and thus provides a new approach of investigating topological orders using quantum computers.
  • Quantum computers promise to outperform their classical counterparts in many applications. Rapid experimental progress in the last two decades includes the first demonstrations of small-scale quantum processors, but realising large-scale quantum information processors capable of universal quantum control remains a challenge. One primary obstacle is the inadequacy of classical computers for the task of optimising the experimental control field as we scale up to large systems. Classical optimisation procedures require a simulation of the quantum system and have a running time that grows exponentially with the number of quantum bits (qubits) in the system. Here we show that it is possible to tackle this problem by using the quantum processor to optimise its own control fields. Using measurement-based quantum feedback control (MQFC), we created a 12-coherence state with the essential control pulse completely designed by a 12-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor. The results demonstrate the superiority of MQFC over classical optimisation methods, in both efficiency and accuracy. The time required for MQFC optimisation is linear in the number of qubits, and our 12-qubit system beat a classical computer configured with 2.4 GHz CPU and 8 GB memory. Furthermore, the fidelity of the MQFC-prepared 12-coherence was about 10% better than the best result using classical optimisation, since the feedback approach inherently corrects for unknown imperfections in the quantum processor. As MQFC is readily transferrable to other technologies for universal quantum information processors, we anticipate that this result will open the way to scalably and precisely control quantum systems, bringing us closer to a demonstration of quantum supremacy.
  • Correlation functions are often employed to quantify the relationships among interdependent variables or sets of data. Recently, a new class of correlation functions, called Forrelation, has been introduced by Aaronson and Ambainis for studying the query complexity of quantum devices. It was found that there exists a quantum query algorithm solving 2-fold Forrelation problems with an exponential quantum speedup over all possible classical means, which represents essentially the largest possible separation between quantum and classical query complexities. Here we report an experimental study probing the 2-fold and 3-fold Forrelations encoded in nuclear spins. The major experimental challenge is to control the spin fluctuation to within a threshold value, which is achieved by developing a set of optimized GRAPE pulse sequences. Overall, our small-scale implementation indicates that the quantum query algorithm is capable of determine the values of Forrelations within an acceptable accuracy required for demonstrating quantum supremacy, given the current technology and in the presence of experimental noise.
  • We develop a novel method for multiphoton controllable transport between remote resonators. Specifically, an auxiliary resonator is used to control the coherent long-range coupling of two spatially separated resonators, mediated by a coupled-resonator chain of arbitrary length. In this manner, an arbitrary multiphoton quantum state can be either transmitted through or reflected off the intermediate chain on demand, with very high fidelity. We find, on using a time-independent perturbative treatment, that quantum information leakage of an arbitrary Fock state is limited by two upper bounds, one for the transmitted case and the other for the reflected case. In principle, the two upper bounds can be made arbitrarily small, which is confirmed by numerical simulations.
  • Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results advance the project of performing efficient and accurate quantum state tomography in practice.
  • Entanglement, one of the central mysteries of quantum mechanics, plays an essential role in numerous applications of quantum information theory. A natural question of both theoretical and experimental importance is whether universal entanglement detection is possible without full state tomography. In this work, we prove a no-go theorem that rules out this possibility for any non-adaptive schemes that employ single-copy measurements only. We also examine in detail a previously implemented experiment, which claimed to detect entanglement of two-qubit states via adaptive single-copy measurements without full state tomography. By performing the experiment and analyzing the data, we demonstrate that the information gathered is indeed sufficient to reconstruct the state. These results reveal a fundamental limit for single-copy measurements in entanglement detection, and provides a general framework to study the detection of other interesting properties of quantum states, such as the positivity of partial transpose and the $k$-symmetric extendibility.
  • Quantum communication holds promise for absolutely security in secret message transmission. Quantum secure direct communication is an important mode of the quantum communication in which secret messages are securely communicated over a quantum channel directly. It has become one of the hot research areas in the last decade, and offers both high security and instantaneousness in communication. It is also a basic cryptographic primitive for constructing other quantum communication tasks such as quantum authentication, quantum dialogue and so on. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of quantum secure direct communication with single photons. The experiment is based on the DL04 protocol, equipped with a simple frequency coding. It has the advantage of being robust against channel noise and loss. The experiment demonstrated explicitly the block data transmission technique, which is essential for quantum secure direct communication. In the experiment, a block transmission of 80 single photons was demonstrated over fiber, and it provides effectively 16 different values, which is equivalent to 4 bits of direct transmission in one block. The experiment has firmly demonstrated the feasibility of quantum secure direct communication in the presence of noise and loss.
  • Quantum gates in experiment are inherently prone to errors that need to be characterized before they can be corrected. Full characterization via quantum process tomography is impractical and often unnecessary. For most practical purposes, it is enough to estimate more general quantities such as the average fidelity. Here we use a unitary 2-design and twirling protocol for efficiently estimating the average fidelity of Clifford gates, to certify a 7-qubit entangling gate in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum processor. Compared with more than $10^8$ experiments required by full process tomography, we conducted 1656 experiments to satisfy a statistical confidence level of 99%. The average fidelity of this Clifford gate in experiment is 55.1%, and rises to 87.5% if the infidelity due to decoherence is removed. The entire protocol of certifying Clifford gates is efficient and scalable, and can easily be extended to any general quantum information processor with minor modifications.
  • Due to its geometric nature, holonomic quantum computation is fault-tolerant against certain types of control errors. Although proposed more than a decade ago, the experimental realization of holonomic quantum computation is still an open challenge. In this Letter, we report the first experimental demonstration of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in liquid NMR quantum information processors. Two non-commuting holonomic single-qubit gates, rotations about x-axis and about z-axis, and the two-qubit holonomic control-NOT gate are realized with high fidelity by evolving the work qubits and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically. The successful realization of these universal elementary gates in nonadiabatic quantum computing demonstrates the experimental feasibility and the fascinating feature of this fast and resilient quantum computing paradigm.
  • Anyons have exotic statistical properties, fractional statistics, differing from Bosons and Fermions. They can be created as excitations of some Hamiltonian models. Here we present an experimental demonstration of anyonic fractional statistics by simulating a version of the Kitaev spin lattice model proposed by Han et al[Phys. Rev.Lett. 98, 150404 (2007)] using an NMR quantum information processor. We use a 7-qubit system to prepare a 6-qubit pseudopure state to implement the ground state preparation and realize anyonic manipulations, including creation, braiding and anyon fusion. A $\pi/2\times 2$ phase difference between the states with and without anyon braiding, which is equivalent to two successive particle exchanges, is observed. This is different from the $\pi\times 2$ and $2\pi \times 2$ phases for Fermions and Bosons after two successive particle exchanges, and is consistent with the fractional statistics of anyons.
  • We suggest a scheme to probe critical phenomena at a quantum phase transition (QPT) using the quantum correlation of two photonic modes simultaneously coupled to a critical system. As an experimentally accessible physical implementation, a circuit QED system is formed by a capacitively coupled Josephson junction qubit array interacting with one superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR). It realizes an Ising chain in the transverse field (ICTF) which interacts with the two magnetic modes propagating in the TLR. We demonstrate that in the vicinity of criticality the originally independent fields tend to display photon bunching effects due to their interaction with the ICTF. Thus, the occurrence of the QPT is reflected by the quantum characteristics of the photonic fields.
  • Two qubit entanglement can be induced by a quantum data bus interacting with them. In this paper, with the quantum spin chain in the transverse field as an illustration of quantum data bus, we show that such induced entanglement can be enhanced by the quantum phase transition (QPT) of the quantum data bus. We consider two external spins simultaneously coupled to a transverse field Ising chain. By adiabatically eliminating the degrees of the chain, the effective coupling between these two spins are obtained. The matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian are expressed in terms of dynamical structure factor (DSF) of the chain. The DSF is the Fourier transformation of the Green function of Ising chain and can be calculated numerically by a method introduced in [O. Derzhko, T. Krokhmalskii, Phys. Rev. B \textbf{56}, 11659 (1997)]. Since all characteristics of QPT are embodied in the DSF, the dynamical evolution of the two external spins displays singularity in the vicinity of the critical point.
  • We theoretically explore the possibility of creating spin entanglement by simultaneously coupling two electronic spins to a nuclear ensemble. By microscopically modeling the spin ensemble with a single mode boson field, we use the time-dependent Fr\"{o}hlich transformation (TDFT) method developed most recently [Yong Li, C. Bruder, and C. P. Sun, Phys. Rev. A \textbf{75}, 032302 (2007)] to calculate the effective coupling between the two spins. Our investigation shows that the total system realizes a solid state based architecture for cavity QED. Exchanging such kind effective boson in a virtual process can result in an effective interaction between two spins. It is discovered that a maximum entangled state can be obtained when the velocity of the electrons matches the initial distance between them in a suitable way. Moreover, we also study how the number of collective excitations influences the entanglement. It is shown that the larger the number of excitation is, the less the two spins entangle each other.
  • The quantum clock synchronization algorithm proposed by I. L. Chuang (Phys. Rev. Lett, 85, 2006(2000)) has been implemented in a three qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system. The effective-pure state is prepared by the spatial averaging approach. The time difference between two separated clocks can be determined by reading out directly through the NMR spectra.
  • A multiple round quantum dense coding (MRQDC) scheme based on the quantum phase estimation algorithm is proposed. Using an $m+1$ qubit system, Bob can transmit $2^{m+1}$ messages to Alice, through manipulating only one qubit and exchanging it between Alice and Bob for $m$ rounds. The information capacity is enhanced to $m+1$ bits. We have implemented the scheme in a three- qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computer. The experimental results show a good agreement between theory and experiment.