• The oxygen-bearing molecular ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ are key species that probe the ionization rate of (partially) molecular gas that is ionized by X-rays and cosmic rays permeating the interstellar medium. We report Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic observations of OH+ in Mrk 231, showing both ground-state P-Cygni profiles, and excited line profiles with blueshifted absorption wings extending up to ~1000 km s^{-1}. In addition, OH+ probes an excited component peaking at central velocities, likely arising from the torus probed by the OH centimeter-wave megamaser. Four lines of H2O+ are also detected at systemic velocities, but H3O+ is undetected. Based on our earlier OH studies, we estimate an abundance ratio of OH/OH+~5-10 for the outflowing components and ~20 for the torus, and an OH+ abundance relative to H nuclei of ~>10^{-7}. We also find high OH+/H2O+ and OH+/H3O+ ratios, both are ~>4 in the torus and ~>10-20 in the outflowing gas components. Chemical models indicate that these high OH+ abundances relative to OH, H2O+, and H3O+ are characteristic of gas with a high ionization rate per unit density, \zeta/n_H~(1-5)x10^{-17} cm^3 s^{-1} and ~(1-2)x10^{-16} cm^3 s^{-1} for the above components, respectively, and an ionization rate of \zeta~(0.5-2)x10^{-12} s^{-1}. X-rays appear to be unable to explain the inferred ionization rate, and thus we suggest that low-energy (10-400 MeV) cosmic-rays are primarily responsible for the ionization with \dot{M}_{CR}~0.01 M_{sun} yr^{-1} and \dot{E}_{CR}~10^{44} erg s^{-1}, the latter corresponding to 1% of the AGN luminosity and similar to the energetics of the molecular outflow. We suggest that cosmic-rays accelerated in the forward shock associated with the molecular outflow are responsible for the ionization, as they diffuse through the outflowing molecular phase downstream.
  • The age and evolutionary status of MWC349A, the unique emission line star with maser and laser radiation in hydrogen recombination lines, remain unknown because the spectrum of the star is veiled by bright emission from the ionized disk and wind. The major argument for this massive ($>$10 M_sun) star being evolved is its association with a close-by (2.4 arcsec) companion, MWC349B, whose B0III spectrum implies an age of a few Myrs. However, newly obtained high-resolution spectra of MWC349B reveal a difference $\approx$ 35 km/s in the radial velocities of the two stars, which makes their being gravitationally bound highly improbable. An estimate of the relative proper motion of the two stars seems to confirm this conclusion. This reopens the previously suggested possibility that MWC349A is a young massive star in a region of active star formation close to the Cyg OB2 association. MWC349B, which moves with a speed $\geq$ 35 km/s relative to Cyg OB2, may be a runaway star from this association.
  • We present the results of our investigation of the star-forming complexes W51 and W43, two of the brightest in the first Galactic quadrant. In order to determine the young stellar object (YSO) populations in W51 and W43 we used color-magnitude relations based on Spitzer mid-infrared and 2MASS/UKIDSS near-infrared data. We identified 302 Class I YSOs and 1178 Class II/transition disk candidates in W51, and 917 Class I YSOs and 5187 Class II/transition disk candidates in W43. We also identified tens of groups of YSOs in both regions using the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) method. We found similar cluster densities in both regions even though Spitzer was not able to probe the densest part of W43. By using the Class II/I ratios, we traced the relative ages within the regions and based on the morphology of the clusters we argue that several sites of star formation are independent of one another in terms of their ages and physical conditions. We used spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting to identify the massive YSO (MYSO) candidates since they play a vital role in the star formation process and then examined them to see if they are related to any massive star formation tracers such as UCH II regions, masers and dense fragments. We identified 17 MYSO candidates in W51, and 14 in W43, respectively and found that groups of YSOs hosting MYSO candidates are positionally associated with H II regions in W51, though we do not see any MYSO candidates associated with previously identified massive dense fragments in W43.
  • We report on the energetics of molecular outflows in 14 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that show unambiguous outflow signatures (P-Cygni profiles or high-velocity absorption wings) in the far-infrared lines of OH measured with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer. Detection of both ground-state (at 119 and 79 um) and one or more radiatively-excited (at 65 and 84 um) lines allows us to model the nuclear gas (<~300 pc) as well as the more extended components using spherically symmetric radiative transfer models. The highest molecular outflow velocities are found in buried sources, in which slower but massive expansion of the nuclear gas is also observed. With the exception of a few outliers, the outflows have momentum fluxes of (2-5)xL_IR/c and mechanical luminosities of (0.1-0.3)% of L_IR. The moderate momentum boosts in these sources (<~3) suggest that the outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the combined effects of AGN and nuclear starbursts, as a result of radiation pressure, winds, and supernovae remnants. In some sources (~20%), however, powerful (10^{10.5-11} Lsun) AGN feedback and (partially) energy-conserving phases are required, with momentum boosts in the range 3-20. These outflows appear to be stochastic strong-AGN feedback events that occur throughout the merging process. In a few sources, the outflow activity in the innermost regions has subsided in the last ~1 Myr. While OH traces the molecular outflows at sub-kpc scales, comparison of the masses traced by OH with those previously inferred from tracers of more extended outflowing gas suggests that most mass is loaded (with loading factors of Mdot/SFR=1-10) from the central galactic cores (a few x 100 pc). Outflow depletion timescales are <10^8 yr, shorter than the gas consumption timescales by factors of 1.1-15, and are anti-correlated with the AGN luminosity.
  • We present mid-IR (19 - 37 microns) imaging observations of S106 from SOFIA/FORCAST, complemented with IR observations from Spitzer/IRAC (3.6 - 8.0 microns), IRTF/MIRLIN (11.3 and 12.5 microns), and Herschel/PACS (70 and 160 microns). We use these observations, observations in the literature, and radiation transfer modeling to study the heating and composition of the warm (~ 100 K) dust in the region. The dust is heated radiatively by the source S106 IR, with little contributions from grain-electron collisions and Ly-alpha radiation. The dust luminosity is >~ (9.02 +/- 1.01) x 10^4 L_sun, consistent with heating by a mid- to late-type O star. We find a temperature gradient (~ 75 - 107 K) in the lobes, which is consistent with a dusty equatorial geometry around S106 IR. Furthermore, the SOFIA observations resolve several cool (~ 65 - 70 K) lanes and pockets of warmer (~ 75 - 90 K) dust in the ionization shadow, indicating that the environment is fragmented. We model the dust mass as a composition of amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, big grains, very small grains, and PAHs. We present the relative abundances of each grain component for several locations in S106.
  • We perform a search for dormant comets, asteroidal objects of cometary origin, in the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population based on dynamical and physical considerations. Our study is based on albedos derived within the ExploreNEOs program and is extended by adding data from NEOWISE and the Akari asteroid catalog. We use a statistical approach to identify asteroids on orbits that resemble those of short-period near-Earth comets using the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, the aphelion distance, and the minimum orbital intersection distance with respect to Jupiter. From the sample of NEAs on comet-like orbits, we select those with a geometric albedo $p_V \leq 0.064$ as dormant comet candidates, and find that only $\sim$50% of NEAs on comet-like orbits also have comet-like albedos. We identify a total of 23 NEAs from our sample that are likely to be dormant short-period near-Earth comets and, based on a de-biasing procedure applied to the cryogenic NEOWISE survey, estimate both magnitude-limited and size-limited fractions of the NEA population that are dormant short-period comets. We find that 0.3-3.3% of the NEA population with $H \leq 21$, and $9^{+2}_{-5}$% of the population with diameters $d \geq 1$ km, are dormant short-period near-Earth comets.
  • Context. The LIRG Zw 049.057 contains a compact obscured nucleus where a considerable amount of the galaxy's luminosity is generated. This nucleus contains a dusty environment that is rich in molecular gas. One approach to probing this kind of environment and to revealing what is hidden behind the dust is to study the rotational lines of molecules that couple well with the IR radiation emitted by the dust. Methods. We observed Zw 049.057 with PACS and SPIRE onboard the Herschel Space Observatory in rotational lines of H2O, H218O, OH, 18OH, and [O I]. We modeled the unresolved core of the galaxy using a spherically symmetric radiative transfer code. Results. We present the full SPIRE FTS spectrum of Zw 049.057, along with relevant spectral scans in the PACS range. We find that a minimum of two different components (nuclear and extended) are required in order to account for the rich molecular line spectrum. The nuclear component has a radius of 10-30 pc, a very high infrared surface brightness (1e14 Lsun/kpc2), warm dust (Td > 100 K), and a very large H2 column density (NH2 = 1e24-1e25 cm-2). The modeling also indicates high nuclear H2O (5e-6) and OH (4e-6) abundances relative to H2 as well as a low 16O/18O-ratio of 50-100. We also find a prominent infall signature in the [O I] line. We tentatively detect a 500 km/s outflow in the H2O 313->202 line. Conclusions. The high surface brightness of the core indicates the presence of either a buried active galactic nucleus or a very dense nuclear starburst.nThe H2O abundance is comparable to that of other compact (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies such as NGC 4418 and Arp 220 - and also to hot cores in the Milky Way. The enhancement of 18O is a possible indicator that the nucleus of Zw 049.057 is in a similar evolutionary stage as the nuclei of Arp 220 - and more advanced than NGC 4418.
  • (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 $\mu$m) luminosities ($L_{LIRG}>10^{11} $L$_\odot$ and $L_{ULIRG}>10^{12}$ L$_\odot$). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES; PI van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10$^{11}\leq L_\odot \geq10^{13}$). With the \emph{Herschel Space Observatory}, we observe [CII] 157 $\mu$m, [OI] 63 $\mu$m, and [OI] 145 $\mu$m line emission with PACS, CO J=4-3 through J=13-12, [CI] 370 $\mu$m, and [CI] 609 $\mu$m with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [OI] 63 $\mu$m emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the IRAS 60/100 $\mu$m ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [CII], [SiII], [OI], and [CI] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO $4\leq J_{upp}\leq13$. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J=1-0 linewidth, and the AGN contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important.
  • Herschel/PACS observations of 29 local (Ultra-)Luminous Infrared Galaxies, including both starburst and AGN-dominated sources as diagnosed in the mid-infrared/optical, show that the equivalent width of the absorbing OH 65 um Pi_{3/2} J=9/2-7/2 line (W_{eq}(OH65)) with lower level energy E_{low}~300 K, is anticorrelated with the [C ii]158 um line to far-infrared luminosity ratio, and correlated with the far-infrared luminosity per unit gas mass and with the 60-to-100 um far-infrared color. While all sources are in the active L_{IR}/M_{H2}>50 Lsun/Msun mode as derived from previous CO line studies, the OH65 absorption shows a bimodal distribution with a discontinuity at L_{FIR}/M_{H2}~100 Lsun/Msun. In the most buried sources, OH65 probes material partially responsible for the silicate 9.7 um absorption. Combined with observations of the OH 71 um Pi_{1/2} J=7/2-5/2 doublet (E_{low}~415 K), radiative transfer models characterized by the equivalent dust temperature, Tdust, and the continuum optical depth at 100 um, tau_{100}, indicate that strong [C ii]158 um deficits are associated with far-IR thick (tau_{100}>~0.7, N_{H}>~10^{24} cm^{-2}), warm (Tdust>~60 K) structures where the OH 65 um absorption is produced, most likely in circumnuclear disks/tori/cocoons. With their high L_{FIR}/M_{H2} ratios and columns, the presence of these structures is expected to give rise to strong [C ii] deficits. W_{eq}(OH65) probes the fraction of infrared luminosity arising from these compact/warm environments, which is >~30-50% in sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}). Sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}) have surface densities of both L_{IR} and M_{H2} higher than inferred from the half-light (CO or UV/optical) radius, tracing coherent structures that represent the most buried/active stage of (circum)nuclear starburst-AGN co-evolution.
  • We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate gamma-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed gamma-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE gamma-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from either one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q22 parameter, which is analogous to the q24 parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 micron. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated with confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate gamma-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.
  • We present the first detection from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 4.5 micron variability from Sgr A*, the emitting source associated with the Milky Way's central black hole. The >23 hour continuous light curve was obtained with the IRAC instrument in 2013 December. The result characterizes the variability of Sgr A* prior to the closest approach of the G2 object, a putative infalling gas cloud that orbits close to Sgr A*. The high stellar density at the location of Sgr A* produces a background of ~250 mJy at 4.5 microns in each pixel with a large pixel-to-pixel gradient, but the light curve for the highly variable Sgr A* source was successfully measured by modeling and removing the variations due to pointing wobble. The observed flux densities range from the noise level of ~0.7 mJy rms in a 6.4-s measurement to ~10 mJy. Emission was seen above the noise level ~34% of the time. The light curve characteristics, including the flux density distribution and structure function, are consistent with those previously derived at shorter infrared wavelengths. We see no evidence in the light curve for activity attributable to the G2 interaction at the observing epoch, ~100 days before the expected G2 periapsis passage. The IRAC light curve is more than a factor of two longer than any previous infrared observation, improving constraints on the timescale of the break in the power spectral distribution of Sgr A* flux densities. The data favor the longer of the two previously published values for the timescale.
  • We present FIR-CO luminosity relations ($\log L_{\rm FIR} = \alpha \log L'_{\rm CO} + \beta$) for the full CO rotational ladder from J=1-0 to J=13-12 for 62 local (z < 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 (sub)-millimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIR-CO luminosity relations towards the high-IR-luminosity end while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-/high-J CO line data available prior to Herschel. This new data-set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIR-CO luminosity relations ($\alpha \sim 1$) for J=1-0 up to J=5-4, with a nearly constant normalisation ($\beta \sim 2$). This is expected from the (also) linear FIR-(molecular line) relations found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However from J=6-5 and up to J=13-12 we find an increasingly sub-linear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (~100K) and dense ($>10^4{\rm cm^{-3}}$) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star formation powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs), which remain highly excited from J=6-5 up to J=13-12, are found to be a generic feature of the (U)LIRGs in our sample, and further support the presence of this gas component.
  • We report on observations of near-Earth asteroid 2011 MD with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have spent 19.9 h of observing time with channel 2 (4.5 {\mu}m) of the Infrared Array Camera and detected the target within the 2{\sigma} positional uncertainty ellipse. Using an asteroid thermophysical model and a model of nongravitational forces acting upon the object we constrain the physical properties of 2011 MD, based on the measured flux density and available astrometry data. We estimate 2011 MD to be 6 (+4/-2) m in diameter with a geometric albedo of 0.3 (+0.4/-0.2) (uncertainties are 1{\sigma}). We find the asteroid's most probable bulk density to be 1.1 (+0.7/-0.5) g cm^{-3}, which implies a total mass of (50-350) t and a macroporosity of >=65%, assuming a material bulk density typical of non-primitive meteorite materials. A high degree of macroporosity suggests 2011 MD to be a rubble-pile asteroid, the rotation of which is more likely to be retrograde than prograde.
  • RR Lyr is one of the most studied variable stars. Its light curve has been regularly monitored since the discovery of the periodic variability in 1899. Analysis of all observed maxima allows us to identify two primary pulsation states defined as pulsation over a long (P0 longer than 0.56684 d) and a short (P0 shorter than 0.56682 d) primary pulsation period. These states alternate with intervals of 13-16 yr, and are well defined after 1943. The 40.8 d periodical modulations of the amplitude and the period (i.e. Blazhko effect) were noticed in 1916. We provide homogeneous determinations of the Blazhko period in the different primary pulsation states. The Blazhko period does not follow the variations of P0 and suddenly diminished from 40.8 d to around 39.0 d in 1975. The monitoring of these periodicities deserved and deserves a continuous and intensive observational effort. For this purpose we have built dedicated, transportable and autonomous small instruments, Very Tiny Telescopes (VTTs), to observe the times of maximum brightness of RR Lyr. As immediate results the VTTs recorded the last change of P0 state in mid-2009 and extended the time coverage of the Kepler observations, thus recording a maximum O-C amplitude of the Blazhko effect at the end of 2008, followed by the historically smallest O-C amplitude in late 2013. This decrease is still ongoing and VTT instruments are ready to monitor the expected increase in the next few years.
  • A significant fraction ($\sim 30$ %) of the gamma-ray sources listed in the second $\textit{Fermi}$ LAT (2FGL) catalog is still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at lower energies. Using the available information at lower energies and optical spectroscopy on the selected counterparts of these gamma-ray objects we can pinpoint their exact nature. Here we present a pilot project pointing to assess the effectiveness of the several classification methods developed to select gamma-ray blazar candidates. To this end, we report optical spectroscopic observations of a sample of 5 gamma-ray blazar candidates selected on the basis of their infrared WISE colors or of their low-frequency radio properties. Blazars come in two main classes: BL Lacs and FSRQs, showing similar optical spectra except for the stronger emission lines of the latter. For three of our sources the almost featureless optical spectra obtained confirm their BL Lac nature, while for the source WISEJ022051.24+250927.6 we observe emission lines with equivalent width $EW\sim 31$ $\AA$, identifying it as a FSRQ with $z = 0.48$. The source WISEJ064459.38+603131.7, although not featuring a clear radio counterpart, shows a blazar-like spectrum with weak emission lines with $EW \sim 7$ $\AA$, yielding a redshift estimate of $z=0.36$. In addition we report optical spectroscopic observations of 4 WISE sources associated with known gamma-ray blazars without a firm classification or redshift estimate. For all of these latter sources we confirm a BL Lac classification, with a tentative redshift estimate for the source WISEJ100800.81+062121.2 of $z = 0.65$.
  • A significant fraction ($\sim 30$ %) of the high-energy gamma-ray sources listed in the second $\textit{Fermi}$ LAT (2FGL) catalog are still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at lower energies. In order to investigate the nature of these enigmatic sources, we present here an extensive search of X-ray sources lying in the positional uncertainty region of a selected sample of these Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources (UGSs) that makes use of all available observations performed by the $\textit{Swift}$ X-ray Telescope before March 31, 2013, available for 205 UGSs. To detect the fainter sources, we merged all the observations covering the $\textit{Fermi}$ LAT positional uncertainty region at 95 % level of confidence of each UGSs. This yields a catalog of 357 X-ray sources, finding {candidate} X-ray counterparts for $\sim 70$ % of the selected sample. In particular, 25 % of the UGSs feature a single X-ray source within their positional uncertainty region while 45 % have multiple X-ray sources. For each X-ray source we also looked in the corresponding $\textit{Swift}$ UVOT merged images for optical and ultraviolet counterparts, also performing source photometry. We found ultraviolet-optical correspondences for $\sim 70$ % of the X-ray sources. We searched several major radio, infrared, optical and ultraviolet surveys for possible counterparts within the positional error of the sources in the X-ray catalog to obtain additional information on their nature. Applying the kernel density estimator technique to infrared colors of WISE counterparts of our X-ray sources we select 6 $\gamma$-ray blazar candidates. In addition, comparing our results with previous analyses, we select 11 additional $\gamma$-ray blazar candidates.
  • We report on Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC observations of near-Earth object (NEO) 2009 BD that were carried out in support of the NASA Asteroid Robotic Retrieval Mission (ARRM) concept. We did not detect 2009 BD in 25 hrs of integration at 4.5 micron. Based on an upper-limit flux density determination from our data, we present a probabilistic derivation of the physical properties of this object. The analysis is based on the combination of a thermophysical model with an orbital model accounting for the non-gravitational forces acting upon the body. We find two physically possible solutions. The first solution shows 2009 BD as a 2.9+/-0.3 m diameter rocky body (rho = 2.9+/-0.5 g cm-3) with an extremely high albedo of 0.85(+0.20/-0.10) that is covered with regolith-like material, causing it to exhibit a low thermal inertia (Gamma = 30(+20/-10) SI units). The second solution suggests 2009 BD to be a 4+/-1 m diameter asteroid with pV = 0.45(+0.35/-0.15) that consists of a collection of individual bare rock slabs (Gamma = 2000+/-1000 SI units, rho = 1.7(+0.7/-0.4) g cm-3). We are unable to rule out either solution based on physical reasoning. 2009 BD is the smallest asteroid for which physical properties have been constrained, in this case using an indirect method and based on a detection limit, providing unique information on the physical properties of objects in the size range smaller than 10 m.
  • We present new BVI photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6981 (M72), based mostly on ground-based CCD archive images. We present a new color-magnitude diagram (CMD) that reaches almost four magnitudes below the turn-off level. We performed new derivations of metallicity and morphological parameters of the evolved sequences, in good agreement with previous authors, obtaining a value of [Fe/H] ~ -1.50 in the new UVES scale. We also identify the cluster's blue straggler population. Comparing the radial distribution of these stars with the red giant branch population, we find that the blue stragglers are more centrally concentrated, as found in previous studies of blue stragglers in globular clusters. Taking advantage of the large field of view covered by our study, we analyzed the surface density profile of the cluster, finding extratidal main sequence stars out to r ~ 14.1 arcmin or about twice the tidal radius. We speculate that this may be due to tidal disruption in the course of M72's orbit, in which case tidal tails associated with the cluster may exist. We also take a fresh look at the variable stars in the cluster, recovering all previous known variables, including three SX Phoenicis stars, and adding three previously unknown RR Lyrae (1 c-type and 2 ab-type) to the total census. Finally, comparing our CMD with unpublished data for M3 (NGC 5272), a cluster with similar metallicity and horizontal branch morphology, we found that both objects are essentially coeval.
  • We are coming to believe that stellar populations in globular clusters are not as simple as they were once thought to be. A growing amount of photometric and spectroscopic evidence shows that globular clusters host at least two different stellar populations. In our contribution to these proceedings we present the first results of a survey we are conducting to look for the presence of multiple populations in a significant number of Galactic globular clusters, using the Str\"omgren system. We intend to photometrically separate these populations and characterize their radial distributions and extensions.
  • An increasing amount of spectroscopic and photometric evidence is showing that the stellar populations of globular clusters are not as simple as they have been considered for many years. The presence of at least two different populations of stars is being discovered in a growing number of globular clusters, both in our Galaxy and in others. We have started a series of observations of Galactic globular clusters using the Str\"omgren photometric system in order to find the signatures of these multiple populations and establish their presence in a more complete sample of globular clusters in the Milky Way, and to study their radial distributions and extensions. We present here the first results of our survey.
  • In a previous paper we identified cores within infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). We regarded those without embedded sources as the least evolved, and labelled them starless. Here we identify the most isolated starless cores and model them using a three-dimensional, multi-wavelength, Monte Carlo, radiative transfer code. We derive the cores' physical parameters and discuss the relation between the mass, temperature, density, size and the surrounding interstellar radiation field (ISRF) for the cores. The masses of the cores were found not to correlate with their radial size or central density. The temperature at the surface of a core was seen to depend almost entirely on the level of the ISRF surrounding the core. No correlation was found between the temperature at the centre of a core and its local ISRF. This was seen to depend, instead, on the density and mass of the core.
  • We have used data taken as part of the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey (Hi-GAL) to study 3171 infrared-dark cloud (IRDC) candidates that were identified in the mid-infrared (8 {\mu}m) by Spitzer (we refer to these as 'Spitzer-dark' regions). They all lie in the range l=300 - 330 \circ and |b| 6 1 \circ. Of these, only 1205 were seen in emission in the far-infrared (250-500 {\mu}m) by Herschel (we call these 'Herschel-bright' clouds). It is predicted that a dense cloud will not only be seen in absorption in the mid-infrared, but will also be seen in emission in the far-infrared at the longest Herschel wavebands (250-500 {\mu}m). If a region is dark at all wavelengths throughout the mid-infrared and far-infrared, then it is most likely to be simply a region of lower background infrared emission (a 'hole in the sky'). Hence, it appears that previous surveys, based on Spitzer and other mid-infrared data alone, may have over-estimated the total IRDC population by a factor of 2. This has implications for estimates of the star formation rate in IRDCs in the Galaxy.We studied the 1205 Herschel-bright IRDCs at 250 {\mu}m, and found that 972 of them had at least one clearly defined 250-{\mu}m peak, indicating that they contained one or more dense cores. Of these, 653 (67 per cent) contained an 8-{\mu}m point source somewhere within the cloud, 149 (15 per cent) contained a 24-{\mu}m point source but no 8-{\mu}m source, and 170 (18 per cent) contained no 24-{\mu}m or 8-{\mu}m point sources. We use these statistics to make inferences about the lifetimes of the various evolutionary stages of IRDCs.
  • We analyse the far infrared dust emission from the Galactic Centre region, including the Circumnuclear Disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with ten detectors observing at ten different wavelengths in the range from 46 to 180 \mum, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the MSX at 21.3 \mum for completeness. We model the combined ISO LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sgr A*, a region that includes the CND. We find that the FIR spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three greybody curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be ~5.0x10e+4 Msum, with luminosities: Lcavity ~2.2x10e+6 Lsun and Lcnd ~1.5x10e+6 Lsun in the central 2 pc radius around SgrA* . We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of ~3.2x10E+4 Msun; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature variations, and we map that distribution.
  • We present the preliminary results of an image-subtraction analysis of the Galactic globular cluster M79 (NGC 1904), as well as a new investigation of the variable star population in NGC 1851. Both M79 and NGC 1851 have been previously associated with the Canis Major overdensity, which has been suggested to have an extragalactic origin. We found 6 new RR Lyrae in M79, and also recovered 3 previously known RR Lyrae. The average period of the 5 ab-type RR Lyrae is 0.68 ~ d, corresponding to an Oosterhoff II classification -- which is unusual, though not unprecedented, for systems of extragalactic origin. We also report on the discovery of at least 4 previously unknown variables in NGC 1851.
  • Space missions to NEOs are being planned at all major space agencies, and recently a manned mission to an NEO was announced as a NASA goal. Efforts to find and select suitable targets (plus backup targets) are severely hampered by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of dynamically favorable NEOs. In particular, current mission scenarios tend to favor primitive low-albedo objects. For the vast majority of NEOs the albedo is unknown. Here we report new constraints on the size and albedo of 65 NEOs with rendezvous deltaV < 7 km/s. Our results are based on thermal-IR flux data obtained in the framework of our ongoing (2009--2011) ExploreNEOs survey (Trilling et al. 2010) using NASA's "Warm Spitzer" space telescope. As of 2010 July 14, we have results for 293 objects in hand (including the 65 low-deltaV NEOs presented here); before the end of 2011 we expect to have measured the size and albedo of ~ 700 NEOs (including probably ~ 160 low-deltaV NEOs). While there are reasons to believe that primitive volatile-rich materials are universally low in albedo, the converse need not be true: the orbital evolution of some dark objects likely has caused them to lose their volatiles by coming too close to the Sun. For all our targets, we give the closest perihelion distance they are likely to have reached (using orbital integrations from Marchi et al. 2009) and corresponding upper limits on the past surface temperature. Low-deltaV objects for which both albedo and thermal history may suggest a primitive composition include (162998) 2001 SK162, (68372) 2001 PM9, and (100085) 1992 UY4.