• Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) $MX_2$ ($M$ = Ti, Nb, Ta; $X$ = S, Se, Te) exhibit a rich set of charge density wave (CDW) orders, which usually coexist and/or compete with superconductivity. The mechanisms of CDWs and superconductivity in TMDs are still under debate. Here we perform an investigation on a typical TMD system, 1\emph{T}-TaSe$_{2-x}$Te$_x$ ($0 \leq x \leq 2$). Doping-induced disordered distribution of Se/Te suppresses CDWs in 1\emph{T}-TaSe$_2$. A domelike superconducting phase with the maximum $T_\textrm{c}^{\textrm{onset}}$ of 2.5 K was observed near CDWs. The superconducting volume is very small inside the CDW phase and becomes very large instantly when the CDW phase is fully suppressed. The observations can be understood based on the strong \emph{\textbf{q}}-dependent electron-phonon coupling-induced periodic-lattice-distortion (PLD) mechanism of CDWs. The volume variation of superconductivity implies the emergence of domain walls in the suppressing process of CDWs. Our concluded scenario makes a fundamental understanding about CDWs and related superconductivity in TMDs.
  • The superconducting (SC) phase in the phase-separated (PS) K0.8Fe1.6+xSe2 (0<=x<=0.15) materials is found to crystallize on Archimedean solid-like frameworks, this structural feature originate from a spinodal phase separation (SPS) at around Ts~540K depending slightly on the Fe concentration. Two stable phases in K0.8Fe1.6+xSe2 are demonstrated to be the SC K0.5Fe2Se2 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) K0.8Fe1.6Se2. The spinodal waves go along the systematic [113] direction and result in notable lamellar structure as illustrated by using the strain-field theoretical simulation. The 3-dimentional SC framework is constructed by hollow truncated octahedra similar with what discussed for Archimedean solids. Based on this structural model, we can efficiently calculate the volume fraction of SC phase in this type of PS SC materials.
  • Structural features of ferroic domains are fundamentally important for the understanding of microstructure and physical properties of ferroic materials, and they are also of technological significance for information storage and electronic switches. There are three well-known forms of ferroic orders in correlation with the spontaneous magnetization, electric polarization, and spontaneous strain, respectively. Ferroelectricity often accompanies ferroelastic strain, so ferroelectric domains tend to form in simple elongated configurations. However, due to strong boundary conditions, ferroelectric domains in nano-materials or near defects can have unusual configurations. In addition, vortex domains where multiple ferroelectric domains merge at one point have been observed in YMnO3. Herein, we report the discovery of unique ferroelectric domains with a concentric cylindrical shape in hexagonal manganites. We have also observed remarkable domains with multiple annular patterns. Our findings could open a new avenue for comprehensive studies of the ferroic domains, and this novel pattern could also leads to possibilities for new technologic applications.
  • Structural investigations on the K0.8Fe1.6+xSe2 superconducting materials have revealed remarkable micro-stripes arising evidently from the phase separation. Two coexisted structural phases can be characterized by modulations of q1 = 1/5[a*+3b*], the antiferromagnetic phase K0.8Fe1.6Se2, and q2 = 1/2[a*+b*], the superconducting phase K0.75Fe2Se2, respectively. These stripe patterns likely result from the anisotropic assembly of superconducting particles along the [110] and [1-10] direction. In addition to the notable stripe structures, a nano-scale phase separation also appears in present superconducting system as clearly observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Certain notable experimental data obtained in this heterogenous system can be quantitatively explained by the percolation scenario.
  • The Fe-based superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 (0.6 {\leg} x {\leg} 1, 0.2{\leg} y {\leg} 0.4) compounds, unlike the well-known RFe2As2 (R = Ba, Sr, Ca) superconductors, contain complex structural features and notable physical properties, such as the Fe-vacancy ordering, multi-superconducting transitions and the phase separation[1]. Recent experimental studies also suggested the presence of remarkable interplay among the Fe-vacancy order and the antiferromagnetic structure[2]. Here we demonstrate that the well-characterized superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 (0.6 {\leg} x {\leg} 0.8, 0.2 {\leg} x {\leg} 0.3) samples contain complex microstructure features and undergo successive phase transitions at low temperatures. In-situ TEM observations on a number of the KxFe2-ySe2 superconductors demonstrated the presence of a remarkable collapse of the Fe-vacancy order above the superconducting transition, as a result, the superconducting phase actually adopts a tetragonal structure without the Fe-vacancy ordering. Moreover, our analysis at the low temperatures suggests that the superconductors likely adopt a Fe-deficient structure with composition of K0.75Fe2-ySe2. These results are important not only for the further optimization of superconducting phase in present system but also for understanding the mechanism of the Fe-based superconductivity.
  • The structural features and physical properties of the antiferromagnetic K0.8Fe1.6Se2 (so called K2Fe4Se5 phase) have been studied in the temperature range from 300K up to 600K. Resistivity measurements on both single crystal and polycrystalline samples reveal a semiconducting behavior. Structural investigations of K2Fe4Se5 by means of transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray diffraction demonstrate the presence of a well-defined superstructure within the a-b plane originating from a Fe-vacancy order along the [130] direction. Moreover, in-situ heating structural analysis shows that K0.8Fe1.6Se2 undergoes a transition of the Fe-vacancy order to disorder at about 600K. The phase separation and the Fe-vacancy ordering in the superconducting materials of KxFe2-ySe2 (0.2 \leq y \leq 0.3) has been briefly discussed.
  • Structural investigations by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on KFexSe2 with 1.5 \leq x \leq 1.8 have revealed a rich variety of microstructure phenomena, the KFe1.5Se2 crystal often shows a superstructure modulation along the [310] zone-axis direction, this superstructure can be well interpreted by the Fe-vacancy order within the a-b plane. Increase of Fe-concentration in the KFexSe2 materials could not only result in the appearance of superconductivity but also yield clear alternations of microstructure. Structural inhomogeneity, the complex superstructures and defect structures in the superconducting KFe1.8Se2 sample have been investigated based on the high-resolution TEM.
  • The SrFe2As2-xPx and CaFe2As2-yPy materials were prepared by a solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate the single-phase samples can be successfully obtained for SrFe2As2-xPx and CaFe2As2-yPy samples. Clear contraction of the lattice parameters are clearly determined due to the relatively smaller P ions substation for As. The SDW instability associated with tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition is suppressed visibly in both systems following with the increase of P contents. The highest superconducting transitions are respectively observed at about 27 K in SrFe2As1.3P0.7 and at about 13 K in CaFe2As1.7P0.3.
  • Electric transport measurements of the charge frustrated LuFe2O4, in which the charge ordering (CO) and electronic ferroelectricity are found, reveal strong nonlinear electric conduction upon application of electrical field in both single crystalline and polycrystalline samples. The threshold electric fields (Et) in single crystalline LuFe2O4 are estimated respectively to be about 60V/cm and 10V/cm with E parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis direction. Experimental measurements also demonstrate that the I-V nonlinearity increases quickly with lowering temperature. Furthermore, our in-situ TEM investigations evidently reveal that the nonlinear I-V behavior is intrinsically in correlation with a current driven charge ordering insulator-metal transition, and the applied electrical field triggers a visible CO collapse recognizable as the fading of satellite spots of the CO modulations.
  • Electronic ferroelectricity from charge ordering (CO) is currently a significant issue that has been extensively investigated in the charge/spin frustrated LuFe2O4 system. Chemical substitution and structural layer intercalation have been considered as potentially effective approaches in our recent study, and we herein report on the structural and multi-ferromagnetic properties in the layered series of LuFe2O4(LuFeO3)n (n=0, 1, and 2). Experimental investigations reveal that the (RFeO3)-layer intercalation results in notable changes in ferroelectricity, magnetic properties and CO features. These results demonstrate that further exploration of this series of layered members might prove fruitful.
  • Raman spectroscopy measurements have been performed on alpha-, beta-, gamma-NaxCoO2 phases differing in their stacking of CoO6 octahedra along the c-axis direction. The results demonstrate that, in general, there are five active phonons for gamma-Na0.75CoO2, two Raman active phonons for alpha-NaCoO2, and four Raman active phonons for beta-NaCoO2. We have also performed Raman scattering measurements on several gamma-(Ca,Sr)xCoO2 (0.15 <= x <= 0.35) samples which show well-defined intercalated Ca/Sr-ordering. The experimental data show that the intercalated cation ordering could result in visible alterations on Raman spectral structures. The observations of the spectral changes along with the variation of the CoO6 stacking, as well as the intercalated Sr/Ca ordering suggest that the interlayer interaction plays an important role for understanding the lattice dynamics in this layered system.
  • Epitaxial Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin films grown on the (001) LaAlO3 substrates with the ferroelectric transition of about 250K have been investigated by TEM and off-axis electron holography. Cross-sectional TEM observations show that the 350nm-thick Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 film has a sharp interface with notable misfit dislocations. Off-axis electron holographic measurements reveal that, at low temperatures, the ferroelectric polarization results in systematic accumulations of negative charges on the interface and positive charges on the film surface, and, at room temperature, certain charges could only accumulate at the interfacial dislocations and other defective areas.