• Hitomi (ASTRO-H) carries two Hard X-ray Telescopes (HXTs) that can focus X-rays up to 80 keV. Combined with the Hard X-ray Imagers (HXIs) that detect the focused X-rays, imaging spectroscopy in the high-energy band from 5 keV to 80 keV is made possible. We studied characteristics of HXTs after the launch such as the encircled energy function (EEF) and the effective area using the data of a Crab observation. The half power diameters (HPDs) in the 5--80 keV band evaluated from the EEFs are 1.59 arcmin for HXT-1 and 1.65 arcmin for HXT-2. Those are consistent with the HPDs measured with ground experiments when uncertainties are taken into account. We can conclude that there is no significant change in the characteristics of the HXTs before and after the launch. The off-axis angle of the aim point from the optical axis is evaluated to be less than 0.5 arcmin for both HXT-1 and HXT-2. The best-fit parameters for the Crab spectrum obtained with the HXT-HXI system are consistent with the canonical values.
  • The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (< 0.25 deg) grazing angles to enhance the reflectivity of reflective coatings. On the other hand, to obtain large collecting area, large mirror diameters (< 350 mm) are necessary. This implies that mirrors with focal lengths >10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with on- ground X-ray facilities, aimed at measuring their effective area and the angular resolution; however, they in general suffer from effects of the finite distance of the X-ray source, e.g. a loss of effective area for double reflection. These effects increase with the focal length of the mirror under test; hence a "partial" full-illumination measurement might not be fully representative of the in-flight performances. Indeed, a pencil beam test can be adopted to overcome this shortcoming, because a sector at a time is exposed to the X-ray flux, and the compensation of the beam divergence is achieved by tilting the optic. In this work we present the result of a hard X-ray test campaign performed at the BL20B2 beamline of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, aimed at characterizing the Point Spread Function (PSF) of a multilayer-coated Wolter-I mirror shell manufactured by Nickel electroforming. The mirror shell is a demonstrator for the NHXM hard X-ray imaging telescope (0.3 - 80 keV), with a predicted HEW (Half Energy Width) close to 20 arcsec. We show some reconstructed PSFs at monochromatic X-ray energies of 15 to 63 keV, and compare them with the PSFs computed from post-campaign metrology data, self-consistently treating profile and roughness data by means of a method based on the Fresnel diffraction theory. The modeling matches the measured PSFs accurately.
  • Athena is an X-ray observatory-class mission concept, developed from April to December 2011 as a result of the reformulation exercise for L-class mission proposals in the framework of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. Athena's science case is that of the Universe of extremes, from Black Holes to Large-scale structure. The specific science goals are structured around three main pillars: "Black Holes and accretion physics", "Cosmic feedback" and "Large-scale structure of the Universe". Underpinning these pillars, the study of hot astrophysical plasmas offered by Athena broadens its scope to virtually all corners of Astronomy. The Athena concept consists of two co-aligned X-ray telescopes, with focal length 12 m, angular resolution of 10" or better, and totalling an effective area of 1 m2 at 1 keV (0.5 m2 at 6 keV). At the focus of one of the telescopes there is a Wide Field Imager (WFI) providing a field of view of 24'\times 24', 150 eV spectral resolution at 6 keV, and high count rate capability. At the focus of the other telescope there is the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS), a cryogenic instrument offering a spectral resolution of 3 eV over a field of view of 2.3' \times 2.3'. Although Athena has not been selected as ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 L1 mission, its science goals and concept conform the basis of what should become ESA's X-ray astronomy flagship.
  • X-ray polarimetry promises to give new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as binary black hole systems, micro-quasars, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur to be used in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 10-80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the electric field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity.
  • X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as binary black hole systems, micro-quasars, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur to be used in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 10-80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the electric field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity.
  • The International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) will address fundamental questions in astrophysics, including "When did the first SMBH form? How does large scale structure evolve? What happens close to a black hole? What is the connection between these processes? What is the equation of state of matter at supra-nuclear density?" This report presents an overview of the assessment study phase of the IXO candidate ESA L-class Cosmic Vision mission. We provide a description of the IXO science objectives, the mission implementation and the payload. The performance will offer more than an order of magnitude improvement in capability compared with Chandra and XMM-Newton. This observatory-class facility comprises a telescope with highly nested grazing incidence optics with a performance requirement of 2.5 sq.m. of effective area at 1.25 keV with a 5" PSF. There is an instrument complement that provides capabilities in imaging, spatially resolved spectroscopy, timing, polarimetry and high resolution dispersive spectroscopy. Since earlier submissions to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey, substantial technological progress has been made, particularly in the mirror development. Risk reduction measures and important programmatic choices have also been identified. An independent internal Technical and Programmatic Review has also been carried out by ESA, concluding with positive recommendations. Subject to successful conclusion of agreements between the partner space agencies, IXO is fully ready to proceed to further definition, moving towards an eventual launch in 2021-2022.
  • One of the main themes in extragalactic astronomy for the next decade will be the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Many future observatories, including JWST, ALMA, GMT, TMT and E-ELT will intensively observe starlight over a broad redshift range, out to the dawn of the modern Universe when the first galaxies formed. It has, however, become clear that the properties and evolution of galaxies are intimately linked to the growth of their central black holes. Understanding the formation of galaxies, and their subsequent evolution, will therefore be incomplete without similarly intensive observations of the accretion light from supermassive black holes (SMBH) in galactic nuclei. To make further progress, we need to chart the formation of typical SMBH at z>6, and their subsequent growth over cosmic time, which is most effectively achieved with X-ray observations. Recent technological developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation now bring this within our grasp, enabling capabilities fully matched to those expected from flagship observatories at longer wavelengths.
  • We use \suzaku observations to measure the spatial variation of the Fe K$\alpha$ line with radius in the \tycho supernova remnant. The Fe line widths show a significant decrease from a FWHM value of 210 eV at the center to 130 eV at the rim. Over the same radial range the line center energy remains nearly constant. These observations are consistent with a scenario in which the shell of Fe-emitting ejecta in \tycho is expanding at speeds of 2800--3350 km s$^{-1}$. The minimum line width we measure is still a factor of two larger than expected from a single component plasma emission model. If thermal Doppler broadening is the dominant additional source of broadening, we infer an ion temperature of $(1--3) \times 10^{10}$ K.
  • The NeXT (New exploration X-ray Telescope), the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission which is currently planed for launch in 2013. NeXT is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector. With these instruments, NeXT covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. The micro-calorimeter system will be developed by international collaboration lead by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~ 7 eV by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued.
  • Tycho's supernova remnant was observed by the XIS and HXD instruments onboard the Suzaku satellite on 2006 June 26-29 for 92 ks. The spectrum up to 30 keV was well fitted with a two-component model, consisting of a power-law with photon index of 2.7 and a thermal bremsstrahlung model with temperature of 4.7 keV. The former component can alternatively be modeled as synchrotron emission from a population of relativistic electrons with an estimated roll-off energy of around 1 keV. In the XIS spectra, in addition to the prominent Fe K_alpha line (6.445 keV), we observe for the first time significant K_alpha line emission from the trace species Cr and Mn at energies of 5.48 keV and 5.95 keV, respectively. Faint K_beta lines from Ca (4.56 keV) and Fe (7.11 keV) are also seen. The ionization states of Cr and Mn, based on their line centroids, are estimated to be similar to that of Fe K_alpha (Fe XV or XVI).
  • We analyzed the data for the nearby cluster of galaxies Abell 2255 from archival XMM-Newton observations in order to search for the properties of X-ray point like structures in the outskirts. 11 point-like X-ray emission is detected. Detected X-ray sources are then observed with the 1.5 meter RTT-150 at Turkish National Observatory for possible optical counterparts. The cluster field is covered through 5 ANDOR photometer pointings. 3 sources have no optical follow-ups. 2 QSOs and 1 star are observed from the field. For 4 sources we have obtained the corresponding redhifts. The cumulative log(N)-log(S) is studied and the cluster source number is calculated to be 4 times higher than the field at Fx~10E-13 ergs cm-2 s-1. This phenomenon is interpreted as increased galaxy activity as they first encounter high density ICM environment at the cluster outskirt. We suggest that X-ray emission is triggered by either increased accretion onto LMXBs, fueling of AGNs and/or awakening of BHs.
  • We present our proposal for a small X-ray mission DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor) to perform survey observations of warm-hot intergalactic medium using OVII and OVIII emission lines. This will be proposed to a small satellite program planned by ISAS/JAXA in Japan for a launch in 2008. The instrument consists of an array of TES microcalorimeters with an energy resolution 2 eV, cooled by mechanical coolers. The X-ray telescope will employ 4-stage reflection mirrors with a focal length as short as 70 cm and an angular resolution 2'. In addition to DIOS, we briefly describe the NeXT (New X-ray Telescope) mission, which is a larger Japanese X-ray observatory to be launched in 2010 and plans to explore non-thermal processes in the universe.
  • The CZT detector on the Infocus hard X-ray telescope is a pixellated solid-state device capable of imaging spectroscopy by measuring the position and energy of each incoming photon. The detector sits at the focal point of an 8m focal length multilayered grazing incidence X-ray mirror which has significant effective area between 20--40 keV. The detector has an energy resolution of 4.0keV at 32keV, and the Infocus telescope has an angular resolution of 2.2 arcminute and a field of view of about 10 arcminutes. Infocus flew on a balloon mission in July 2001 and observed Cygnus X-1. We present results from laboratory testing of the detector to measure the uniformity of response across the detector, to determine the spectral resolution, and to perform a simple noise decomposition. We also present a hard X-ray spectrum and image of Cygnus X-1, and measurements of the hard X-ray CZT background obtained with the SWIN detector on Infocus.
  • We present results of new ASCA observations of the low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) NGC 4579 obtained on 1998 December 18 and 28, and we report on detection of variability of an iron K emission line. The X-ray luminosities in the 2--10 keV band for the two observations are nearly identical (LX $\approx$ 2$\times10^{41}$ ergs/s), but they are $\sim$35% larger than that measured in 1995 July by Terashima et al. An Fe K emission line is detected at $6.39\pm0.09$ keV (source rest frame) which is lower than the line energy $6.73^{+0.13}_{-0.12}$ keV in the 1995 observation. If we fit the Fe lines with a blend of two Gaussians centered at 6.39 keV and 6.73 keV, the intensity of the 6.7 keV line decreases, while the intensity of the 6.4 keV line increases, within an interval of 3.5 yr. This variability rules out thermal plasmas in the host galaxy as the origin of the ionized Fe line in this LLAGN. The detection and variability of the 6.4 keV line indicates that cold matter subtends a large solid angle viewed from the nucleus and that it is located within $\sim1$ pc from the nucleus. It could be identified with an optically thick standard accretion disk. If this is the case, a standard accretion disk is present at the Eddington ratio of $L_{\rm Bol}/L_{\rm Eddington} \sim 2\times10^{-3}$. A broad disk-line profile is not clearly seen and the structure of the innermost part of accretion disk remains unclear.
  • We present ASCA observations of LINERs without broad H$\alpha$ emission in their optical spectra. The sample of "type 2" LINERs consists of NGC 404, 4111, 4192, 4457, and 4569. We have detected X-ray emission from all the objects except for NGC 404; among the detected objects are two so-called transition objects (NGC 4192 and NGC 4569), which have been postulated to be composite nuclei having both an HII region and a LINER component. The images of NGC 4111 and NGC 4569 in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-7 keV) X-ray bands are extended on scales of several kpc. The X-ray spectra of NGC 4111, NGC 4457 and NGC 4569 are well fitted by a two-component model that consists of soft thermal emission with $kT\sim0.65$ keV and a hard component represented by a power law (photon index $\sim$ 2) or by thermal bremsstrahlung emission ($kT\sim$ several keV). The extended hard X-rays probably come from discrete sources, while the soft emission most likely originates from hot gas produced by active star formation in the host galaxy. We have found no clear evidence for the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the sample. If an AGN component is the primary ionization source of the optical emission lines, then it must be heavily obscured with a column density significantly larger than $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$. Alternatively, the optical emission could be ionized by a population of exceptionally hot stars.
  • We report the detection of a 58 ks (16 hr) periodicity in the 0.5-10 keV X-ray light curve of the Seyfert galaxy IRAS18325-5926 (Fairall49), obtained from a 5-day ASCA observation. Nearly 9 cycles of the periodic variation are seen; it shows no strong energy dependence and has an amplitude of about 15 per cent. Unlike most other well-studied Seyfert galaxies, there is no evidence for strong power-law red noise in the X-ray power spectrum of IRAS18325-5926. Scaling from the QPOs found in Galactic black hole candidates suggests that the mass of the black hole in IRAS18325-5926 is (6-40) million solar masses.
  • Analysis results from ASCA and ROSAT observations of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 766 are reported. In the ASCA observation we observed rapid variability with a doubling time scale of 1000 seconds. A spectral variability event was observed in which the spectrum softened and hardened above and below ~1 keV, respectively, as the flux increased. The spectra could be modeled with 5 components: a power law, warm absorber, iron K(alpha) line and soft excess component flux. The spectral variability resulted from a highly significant change in the intrinsic photon law index from Gamma ~1.6 to ~2.0, an increase in the warm absorber ionization, and a marginally significant decrease in the soft component normalization. A ~100 eV equivalent width narrow iron K(alpha) line was detected in the high state spectrum. Spectral hardening during flux increases was observed in three ROSAT observations. The change in intrinsic photon index and disappearance of the soft excess component in the ASCA spectra can be explained as a transition from a first order pair reprocessed spectrum to a pair cascade brought about by a sudden increase in the injected electron Lorentz factor. The change in the ionization of the warm absorber, though model dependent, could correspond to the increase in flux at the oxygen edges resulting from the spectral index change. The ROSAT spectral variability can be interpreted by variable intensity hard power law and a relatively nonvarying soft component, possibly primary disk emission. These results are compared with those reported from other narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.
  • We present the results of a 4 day ASCA observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15, focussing on the nature of the X-ray absorption by the warm absorber, characterizd by the K-edges of the intermediately ionized oxygen, OVII and OVIII. We confirm that the column density of OVIII changes on a timescale of $\sim 10^4$~s when the X-ray continuum flux decreases. The significant anti-correlation of column density with continuum flux gives direct evidence that the warm absorber is photoionized by the X-ray continuum. From the timescale of the variation of the OVIII column density, we estimate that it originates from gas within a radius of about $10^{17}\cm$ of the central engine. In contrast, the depth of the OVII edge shows no response to the continuum flux, which indicates that it originates in gas at larger radii. Our results strongly suggest that there are two warm absorbing regions; one located near or within the Broad Line Region, the other associated with the outer molecular torus, scattering medium or Narrow Line Region.
  • We present a detailed re-analysis of the two {\it ASCA} Performance Verification observations of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. Confirming the results of Fabian et al. (1994), we find definite evidence for the {\sc O\,vii} and {\sc O\,viii} K-shell absorption edges of the warm absorber and a doubling of the warm absorber column density within the 3 weeks separating the two observations. No intra-day {\it flux-correlated} variability of the warm absorber is found. However, we report the discovery of an `event' in which the warm absorber parameters temporarily change for \sim10\,000\thinspace s before returning to their original values. Possible interpretations are discussed but a contradiction remains: the constancy of the ionization state of the warm absorber argues that it lies at large distances from the central source whereas the short term change in column density argues for small distances. Fluorescent iron emission is examined. As found by Fabian et al. (1994), the iron line is broad and strong (equivalent width \sim300\thinspace eV). The line profile is also suggestive of it being skewed. Such a line would be expected from a relativistic accretion disk. We also find very rapid primary X-ray variability. Assuming relativistic beaming to be unimportant, the derived efficiency is comparable to the maximum obtainable from accretion onto a Schwarzschild black hole. Correlated variability outside of the energy range of {\it ASCA} might exceed this maximum, thus requiring efficient accretion onto a Kerr hole.