• Stellar rotation is a key in our understanding of both mass-loss and evolution of intermediate and massive stars. It can lead to anisotropic mass-loss in the form of radiative wind or an excretion disk. We wished to spatially resolve the photosphere and gaseous environment of 51 Oph, a peculiar star with a very high vsin(i) of 267km s$^{-1}$ and an evolutionary status that remains unsettled. It has been classified by different authors as a Herbig, a $\beta$ Pic, or a classical Be star. We used the VEGA visible beam combiner installed on the CHARA array that reaches a submilliarcsecond resolution. Observation were centered on the H$\alpha$ emission line. We derived, for the first time, the extension and flattening of 51 Oph photosphere. We found a major axis of $\theta_{{\mathrm{eq}}}$=8.08$\pm$0.70$R_\odot$ and a minor axis of $\theta_{{\mathrm{pol}}}$=5.66$\pm$0.23$R_\odot$ . This high photosphere distortion shows that the star is rotating close to its critical velocity. Finally, using spectro-interferometric measurements in the H$ \alpha$ line, we constrained the circumstellar environment geometry and kinematics and showed that the emission is produced in a 5.2$\pm$2R$_{*}$ disk in Keplerian rotation. From the visible point of view, 51 Oph presents all the features of a classical Be star: near critical-rotation and double-peaked H$\alpha $ line in emission produced in a gaseous disk in Keplerian rotation. However, this does not explain the presence of dust as seen in the mid-infrared and millimeter spectra, and the evolutionary status of 51 Oph remains unsettled.
  • We report new CHARA/MIRC interferometric observations of the Cepheid archetype $\delta$ Cep, which aimed at detecting the newly discovered spectroscopic companion. We reached a maximum dynamic range $\Delta H $ = 6.4, 5.8, and 5.2 mag, respectively within the relative distance to the Cepheid $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. Our observations did not show strong evidence of a companion. We have a marginal detection at $3\sigma$ with a flux ratio of 0.21\%, but nothing convincing as we found other possible probable locations. We ruled out the presence of companion with a spectral type earlier than F0V, A1V and B9V, respectively for the previously cited ranges $r$. From our estimated sensitivity limits and the Cepheid light curve, we derived lower-limit magnitudes in the $H$ band for this possible companion to be $H_\mathrm{comp} > 9.15, 8.31$ and 7.77 mag, respectively for $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. We also found that to be consistent with the predicted orbital period, the companion has to be located at a projected separation $< 24$ mas with a spectral type later than a F0V star.
  • We have observed and spatially resolved a set of seven A-type stars in the nearby Ursa Major moving group with the Classic, CLIMB, and PAVO beam combiners on the CHARA Array. At least four of these stars have large rotational velocities ($v \sin i$ $\gtrsim$ 170 $\mathrm{km~s^{-1}}$) and are expected to be oblate. These interferometric measurements, the stars' observed photometric energy distributions, and $v \sin i$ values are used to computationally construct model oblate stars from which stellar properties (inclination, rotational velocity, and the radius and effective temperature as a function of latitude, etc.) are determined. The results are compared with MESA stellar evolution models (Paxton et al. 2011, 2013) to determine masses and ages. The value of this new technique is that it enables the estimation of the fundamental properties of rapidly rotating stars without the need to fully image the star. It can thus be applied to stars with sizes comparable to the interferometric resolution limit as opposed to those that are several times larger than the limit. Under the assumption of coevality, the spread in ages can be used as a test of both the prescription presented here and the MESA evolutionary code for rapidly rotating stars. With our validated technique, we combine these age estimates and determine the age of the moving group to be 414 $\pm$ 23 Myr, which is consistent with, but much more precise than previous estimates.
  • Presented are the first interferometric images of cool starspots on the chromospherically active giant $\lambda$ Andromedae. These images represent the first model-independent images of cool starspots on a star other than the Sun to date. The interferometric observations, taken with the Michigan Infra-Red Combiner coupled to the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array, span 26 days from Aug 17$^{th}$, 2008 to Sep 24$^{th}$, 2011. The photometric time series acquired at Fairborn Observatory spanning Sep 20$^{th}$, 2008 to Jan 20$^{th}$, 2011 is also presented. The angular diameter and power law limb-darkening coefficient of this star are 2.759 $\pm$ 0.050 mas and 0.229 $\pm$ 0.111, respectively. Starspot properties are obtained from both modeled and SQUEEZE reconstructed images. The images from 2010 through 2011 show anywhere from one to four starspots. The measured properties of identical starspots identified in both the model and reconstructed images are within two $\sigma$ error bars in 51$\%$ of cases. The cadence in the data for the 2010 and 2011 data sets are sufficient to measure a stellar rotation period based on apparent starspot motion. This leads to estimates of the rotation period (P$_{2010}$ = 60 $\pm$ 13 days, P$_{2011}$ = 54.0 $\pm$ 7.6 days) that are consistent with the photometrically determined period of 54.8 days. In addition, the inclination and position angle of the rotation axis is computed for both the 2010 and 2011 data sets; values ($\bar{\Psi}$ = 21.5$\degree$, $\bar{\emph{i}}$ = 78.0$\degree$) for each are nearly identical between the two years. \end{abstract}
  • Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars. Aims. We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit. The search pro- cedure is made on a N x N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3{\sigma} detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at > 13 sigmas. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15 sigmas with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 +/- 0.30 %. We made a possible detection of the companion orbiting RT Aur with f = 0.22 +/- 0.11 %. It was detected at 3.8{\sigma} using the closure phases only, and so more observations are needed to confirm the detection. We also set the detection limit for possible undetected companions. We found that there is no companion with a spectral type earlier than B7V, A5V, F0V, B9V, A0V, and B9V orbiting V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul, respectively.
  • The rapidly rotating Be star phi Persei was spun up by mass and angular momentum transfer from a now stripped-down, hot subdwarf companion. Here we present the first high angular resolution images of phi Persei made possible by new capabilities in longbaseline interferometry at near-IR and visible wavelengths. We observed phi Persei with the MIRC and VEGA instruments of the CHARA Array. Additional MIRC-only observations were performed to track the orbital motion of the companion, and these were fit together with new and existing radial velocity measurements of both stars to derive the complete orbital elements and distance. The hot subdwarf companion is clearly detected in the near-IR data at each epoch of observation with a flux contribution of 1.5% in the H band, and restricted fits indicate that its flux contribution rises to 3.3% in the visible. A new binary orbital solution is determined by combining the astrometric and radial velocity measurements. The derived stellar masses are 9.6+-0.3Msol and 1.2+-0.2Msol for the Be primary and subdwarf secondary, respectively. The inferred distance (186 +- 3 pc), kinematical properties, and evolutionary state are consistent with membership of phi Persei in the alpha Per cluster. From the cluster age we deduce significant constraints on the initial masses and evolutionary mass transfer processes that transformed the phi Persei binary system. The interferometric data place strong constraints on the Be disk elongation, orientation, and kinematics, and the disk angular momentum vector is coaligned with and has the same sense of rotation as the orbital angular momentum vector. The VEGA visible continuum data indicate an elongated shape for the Be star itself, due to the combined effects of rapid rotation, partial obscuration of the photosphere by the circumstellar disk, and flux from the bright inner disk.
  • The aim of this work is to improve the SBC relation for early-type stars in the $-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$ color domain, using optical interferometry. Observations of eight B- and A-type stars were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument in the visible. The derived uniform disk angular diameters were converted into limb darkened angular diameters and included in a larger sample of 24 stars, already observed by interferometry, in order to derive a revised empirical relation for O, B, A spectral type stars with a V-K color index ranging from -1 to 0. We also took the opportunity to check the consistency of the SBC relation up to $V-K \simeq 4$ using 100 additional measurements. We determined the uniform disk angular diameter for the eight following stars: $\gamma$ Ori, $\zeta$ Per, $8$ Cyg, $\iota$ Her, $\lambda$ Aql, $\zeta$ Peg, $\gamma$ Lyr, and $\delta$ Cyg with V-K color ranging from -0.70 to 0.02 and typical precision of about $1.5\%$. Using our total sample of 132 stars with $V-K$ colors index ranging from about $-1$ to $4$, we provide a revised SBC relation. For late-type stars ($0 \leq V-K \leq 4$), the results are consistent with previous studies. For early-type stars ($-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$), our new VEGA/CHARA measurements combined with a careful selection of the stars (rejecting stars with environment or stars with a strong variability), allows us to reach an unprecedented precision of about 0.16 magnitude or $\simeq 7\%$ in terms of angular diameter.
  • We aim at determining the masses of Cepheids in binary systems, as well as their geometric distances and the flux contribution of the companions. The combination of interferometry with spectroscopy will offer a unique and independent estimate of the Cepheid masses. Using long-baseline interferometry at visible and infrared wavelengths, it is possible to spatially resolve binary systems containing a Cepheid down to milliarcsecond separations. Based on the resulting visual orbit and radial velocities, we can then derive the fundamental parameters of these systems, particularly the masses of the components and the geometric distance. We therefore performed interferometric observations of the first-overtone mode Cepheid V1334 Cyg with the CHARA/MIRC combiner. We report the first detection of a Cepheid companion using long-baseline interferometry. We detect the signature of a companion orbiting V1334 Cyg at two epochs. We measure a flux ratio between the companion and the Cepheid f = 3.10+/-0.08%, giving an apparent magnitude mH = 8.47+/-0.15mag. The combination of interferometric and spectroscopic data have enabled the unique determination of the orbital elements: P = 1938.6+/-1.2 days, Tp = 2 443 616.1+/-7.3, a = 8.54+/-0.51mas, i = 124.7+/-1.8{\deg}, e = 0.190+/-0.013, {\omega} = 228.7+/-1.6{\deg}, and {\Omega} = 206.3+/-9.4{\deg}. We derive a minimal distance d ~ 691 pc, a minimum mass for both stars of 3.6 Msol, with a spectral type earlier than B5.5V for the companion star. Our measured flux ratio suggests that radial velocity detection of the companion using spectroscopy is within reach, and would provide an orbital parallax and model-free masses.
  • Due to the strong magnetic field and related abnormal surface layers existing in rapidly oscillating Ap stars, systematic errors are likely to be present when determining their effective temperatures, which potentially compromises asteroseismic studies of these pulsators. Using long-baseline interferometry, our goal is to determine accurate angular diameters of a number of roAp targets to provide a temperature calibration for these stars. We obtained interferometric observations of 10 Aql with the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA array. We determined a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.275+/-0.009 mas and deduced a linear radius of 2.32+/-0.09 R_sun. We estimated the star's bolometric flux and used it, in combination with its parallax and angular diameter, to determine the star's luminosity and effective temperature. For two data sets of bolometric flux we derived an effective temperature of 7800+/-170 K and a luminosity of 18+/-1 L_sun or of 8000+/-210 K and 19+/-2 L_sun. We used these fundamental parameters together with the large frequency separation to constrain the mass and the age of 10 Aql, using the CESAM stellar evolution code. Assuming a solar chemical composition and ignoring all kinds of diffusion and settling of elements, we obtained a mass of 1.92 M_sun and an age of 780 Gy or a mass of 1.95 M_sun and an age of 740 Gy, depending on the considered bolometric flux. For the first time, we managed to determine an accurate angular diameter for a star smaller than 0.3 mas and to derive its fundamental parameters. In particular, by only combining our interferometric data and the bolometric flux, we derived an effective temperature that can be compared to those derived from atmosphere models. Such fundamental parameters can help for testing the mechanism responsible for the excitation of the oscillations observed in the magnetic pulsating stars.
  • Young close binaries clear central cavities in their surrounding circumbinary disk from which the stars can still accrete material. This process takes place within the very first astronomical units, and is still not well constrained as the observational evidence has been gathered, until now, only by means of spectroscopy. The young object HD200775 (MWC361) is a massive spectroscopic binary (separation of ~15.9mas, ~5.0~AU), with uncertain classification (early/late Be), that shows a strong and variable Halpha emission. We aim to study the mechanisms that produce the Halpha line at the AU-scale. Combining the radial velocity measurements and astrometric data available in the literature, we determined new orbital parameters. With the VEGA instrument on the CHARA array, we spatially and spectrally resolved the Halpha emission of HD200775, at low and medium spectral resolutions (R~1600 and 5000) over a full orbital period (~3.6 years). We observe that the Halpha equivalent width varies with the orbital phase, and increases close to periastron, as expected from theoretical models that predict an increase of the mass transfer from the circumbinary disk to the primary disk. In addition, using spectral visibilities and differential phases, we find marginal variations of the typical extent of the Halpha emission (at 1 to 2-sigma level) and location (at 1 to 5-sigma level). The spatial extent of the Halpha emission, as probed by a Gaussian FWHM, is minimum at the ascending node (0.67+/-0.20 mas, i.e., 0.22+/-0.06 AU), and more than doubles at periastron. In addition, the Gaussian photocenter is slightly displaced in the direction opposite to the secondary, ruling out the scenario in which all or most of the Halpha emission is due to accretion onto the secondary. These findings, together with the wide Halpha line profile, may be due to a non-spherical wind enhanced at periastron.
  • Optical and infrared interferometers definitively established that the photometric standard Vega (alpha Lyrae) is a rapidly rotating star viewed nearly pole-on. Recent independent spectroscopic analyses could not reconcile the inferred inclination angle with the observed line profiles, preferring a larger inclination. In order to resolve this controversy, we observed Vega using the six-beam Michigan Infrared Combiner on the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array. With our greater angular resolution and dense (u,v)-coverage, we find Vega is rotating less rapidly and with a smaller gravity darkening coefficient than previous interferometric results. Our models are compatible with low photospheric macroturbulence and also consistent with the possible rotational period of ~0.71 days recently reported based on magnetic field observations. Our updated evolutionary analysis explicitly incorporates rapid rotation, finding Vega to have a mass of 2.15+0.10_-0.15 Msun and an age 700-75+150 Myrs, substantially older than previous estimates with errors dominated by lingering metallicity uncertainties (Z=0.006+0.003-0.002).
  • Studying exoplanet host stars is of the utmost importance to establish the link between the presence of exoplanets around various types of stars and to understand the respective evolution of stars and exoplanets. Using the limb-darkened diameter (LDD) obtained from interferometric data, we determine the fundamental parameters of four exoplanet host stars. We are particularly interested in the F4 main-sequence star, {\theta} Cyg, for which Kepler has recently revealed solar-like oscillations that are unexpected for this type of star. Furthermore, recent photometric and spectroscopic measurements with SOPHIE and ELODIE (OHP) show evidence of a quasi-periodic radial velocity of \sim150 days. Models of this periodic change in radial velocity predict either a complex planetary system orbiting the star, or a new and unidentified stellar pulsation mode. We performed interferometric observations of {\theta} Cyg, 14 Andromedae, {\upsilon} Andromedae and 42 Draconis for two years with VEGA/CHARA (Mount Wilson, California) in several three-telescope configurations. We measured accurate limb darkened diameters and derived their radius, mass and temperature using empirical laws. We obtain new accurate fundamental parameters for stars 14 And, {\upsilon} And and 42 Dra. We also obtained limb darkened diameters with a minimum precision of \sim 1.3%, leading to minimum planet masses of Msini=5.33\pm 0.57, 0.62 \pm 0.09 and 3.79\pm0.29 MJup for 14 And b, {\upsilon} And b and 42 Dra b, respectively. The interferometric measurements of {\theta} Cyg show a significant diameter variability that remains unexplained up to now. We propose that the presence of these discrepancies in the interferometric data is caused by either an intrinsic variation of the star or an unknown close companion orbiting around it.
  • We report the first angular diameter measurements of two classical Cepheids, FF Aql and T Vul, that we have obtained with the FLUOR instrument installed at the CHARA interferometric array. We obtain average limb-darkened angular diameters of \theta_LD = 0.878 +/- 0.013 mas and \theta_LD = 0.629 +/- 0.013 mas, respectively for FF Aql and T Vul. Combining these angular diameters with the HST-FGS trigonometric parallaxes leads to linear radii R = 33.6 +/- 2.2 Rsol and R = 35.6 +/- 4.4 Rsol, respectively. The comparison with empirical and theoretical Period-Radius relations leads to the conclusion that these Cepheids are pulsating in their fundamental mode. The knowledge of the pulsation mode is of prime importance to calibrate the Period-Luminosity relation with a uniform sample of fundamental mode Cepheids.
  • Wolf-Rayet stars represent one of the final stages of massive stellar evolution. Relatively little is known about this short-lived phase and we currently lack reliable mass, distance, and binarity determinations for a representative sample. Here we report the first visual orbit for WR 140(=HD193793), a WC7+O5 binary system known for its periodic dust production episodes triggered by intense colliding winds near periastron passage. The IOTA and CHARA interferometers resolved the pair of stars in each year from 2003--2009, covering most of the highly-eccentric, 7.9 year orbit. Combining our results with the recent improved double-line spectroscopic orbit of Fahed et al. (2011), we find the WR 140 system is located at a distance of 1.67 +/- 0.03 kpc, composed of a WR star with M_WR = 14.9 +/- 0.5 Msun and an O star with M_O = 35.9 +/- 1.3 Msun. Our precision orbit yields key parameters with uncertainties times 6 smaller than previous work and paves the way for detailed modeling of the system. Our newly measured flux ratios at the near-infrared H and Ks bands allow an SED decomposition and analysis of the component evolutionary states.
  • Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of {\theta}LD = 0.445 \pm 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 \pm 0.04 Rsun. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 \pm 0.08 Msun and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 \pm 100 K, log g = 4.21 \pm 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.
  • We aim to constrain the geometrical extent of the chromosphere of non-binary K giant stars and detect any spatial structures in the chromosphere. We performed observations with the CHARA interferometer and the VEGA beam combiner at optical wavelengths. We observed seven non-binary K giant stars. We measured the ratio of the radii of the photosphere to the chromosphere using the interferometric measurements in the Halpha and the Ca II infrared triplet line cores. For beta Ceti, spectro-interferometric observations are compared to an non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) semi-empirical model atmosphere including a chromosphere. The NLTE computations provide line intensities and contribution functions that indicate the relative locations where the line cores are formed and can constrain the size of the limb-darkened disk of the stars with chromospheres. We measured the angular diameter of seven K giant stars and deduced their fundamental parameters: effective temperatures, radii, luminosities, and masses. We determined the geometrical extent of the chromosphere for four giant stars. The chromosphere extents obtained range between 16% to 47% of the stellar radius. The NLTE computations confirm that the Ca II/849 nm line core is deeper in the chromosphere of ? Cet than either of the Ca II/854 nm and Ca II/866 nm line cores. We present a modified version of a semi-empirical model atmosphere derived by fitting the Ca II triplet line cores of this star. In four of our targets, we also detect the signature of a differential signal showing the presence of asymmetries in the chromospheres. Conclusions. It is the first time that geometrical extents and structure in the chromospheres of non-binary K giant stars are determined by interferometry. These observations provide strong constrains on stellar atmosphere models.
  • Classical Be stars are hot non-supergiant stars surrounded by a gaseous circumstellar disk that is responsible for the observed IR-excess and emission lines. The influence of binarity on these phenomena remains controversial. delta Sco is a binary system whose primary suddently began to exhibit the Be phenomenon at the last periastron in 2000. We want to constrain the geometry and kinematics of its circumstellar environment. We observed the star between 2007 and 2010 using spectrally-resolved interferometry with the VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/VEGA instruments. We found orbital elements that are compatible with previous estimates. The next periastron should take place around July 5, 2011 (+- 4,days). We resolved the circumstellar disk in the HAlpha (FWHM = 4.8+-1.5mas), BrGamma (FWHM = 2.9 0.,mas), and the 2.06$ \mu$m HeI (FWHM = 2.4+-0.3mas) lines as well as in the K band continuum (FWHM ~2.4mas). The disk kinematics are dominated by the rotation, with a disk expansion velocity on the order of 0.2km/s. The rotation law within the disk is compatible with Keplerian rotation. As the star probably rotates at about 70% of its critical velocity the ejection of matter doesn't seems to be dominated by rotation. However, the disk geometry and kinematics are similar to that of the previously studied quasi-critically rotating Be stars, namely Alpha Ara, Psi Per and 48 Per.
  • Near-infrared interferometers have recently imaged a number of rapidly rotating A-type stars, finding levels of gravity darkening inconsistent with theoretical expectations. Here, we present new imaging of both a cooler star {\beta} Cas (F2IV) and a hotter one {\alpha} Leo (B7V) using the CHARA array and the MIRC instrument at the H band. Adopting a solid-body rotation model with a simple gravity darkening prescription, we modeled the stellar geometric properties and surface temperature distributions, confirming both stars are rapidly rotating and show gravity darkening anomalies. We estimate the masses and ages of these rapid rotators on L-Rpol and HR diagrams constructed for non-rotating stars by tracking their non-rotating equivalents. The unexpected fast rotation of the evolved subgiant {\beta} Cas offers a unique test of the stellar core-envelope coupling, revealing quite efficient coupling over the past ~ 0.5 Gyr. Lastly we summarize all our interferometric determinations of the gravity darkening coefficient for rapid rotators, finding none match the expectations from the widely used von Zeipel gravity darkening laws. Since the conditions of the von Zeipel law are known to be violated for rapidly rotating stars, we recommend using the empirically-derived {\beta} = 0.19 for such stars with radiation-dominated envelopes. Furthermore, we note that no paradigm exists for self-consistently modeling heavily gravity-darkened stars that show hot radiative poles with cool convective equators.
  • We present measurements of fundamental astrophysical properties of nearby, low-mass, K- and M-dwarfs from our DISCOS survey (DIameterS of COol Stars). The principal goal of our study is the determination of linear radii and effective temperatures for these stars. We calculate their radii from angular diameter measurements using the CHARA Array and Hipparcos distances. Combined with bolometric flux measurements based on literature photometry, we use our angular diameter results to calculate their effective surface temperatures. We present preliminary results established on an assortment of empirical relations to the stellar effective temperature and radius that are based upon these measurements. We elaborate on the discrepancy seen between theoretical and observed stellar radii, previously claimed to be related to stellar activity and/or metallicity. Our preliminary conclusion, however, is that convection plays a larger role in the determination of radii of these late-type stars. Understanding the source of the radius disagreement is likely to impact other areas of study for low-mass stars, such as the detection and characterization of extrasolar planets in the habitable zones.
  • Physical processes working in the stellar interiors as well as the evolution of stars depend on some fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, luminosity, and chemical abundances. A classical way to test stellar interior models is to compare the predicted and observed location of a star on theoretical evolutionary tracks in a H-R diagram. This requires the best possible determinations of stellar mass, radius, luminosity and abundances. To derive its fundamental parameters, we observed the well-known rapidly oscillating Ap star, $\gamma$ Equ, using the visible spectro-interferometer VEGA installed on the optical CHARA array. We computed the calibrated squared visibility and derived the limb-darkened diameter. We used the whole energy flux distribution, the parallax and this angular diameter to determine the luminosity and the effective temperature of the star. We obtained a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.564~$\pm$~0.017~mas and deduced a radius of $R$~=~2.20~$\pm$~0.12~${\rm R_{\odot}}$. Without considering the multiple nature of the system, we derived a bolometric flux of $(3.12\pm 0.21)\times 10^{-7}$ erg~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$ and an effective temperature of 7364~$\pm$~235~K, which is below the effective temperature that has been previously determined. Under the same conditions we found a luminosity of $L$~=~12.8~$\pm$~1.4~${\rm L_{\odot}}$. When the contribution of the closest companion to the bolometric flux is considered, we found that the effective temperature and luminosity of the primary star can be, respectively, up to $\sim$~100~K and up to $\sim$~0.8~L$_\odot$ smaller than the values mentioned above.These new values of the radius and effective temperature should bring further constraints on the asteroseismic modelling of the star.
  • High-precision interferometric measurements of pulsating stars help to characterize their close environment. In 1974, a close companion was discovered around the pulsating star beta Cep using the speckle interferometry technique and features at the limit of resolution (20 milli-arcsecond or mas) of the instrument were mentioned that may be due to circumstellar material. Beta Cep has a magnetic field that might be responsible for a spherical shell or ring-like structure around the star as described by the MHD models. Using the visible recombiner VEGA installed on the CHARA long-baseline interferometer at Mt. Wilson, we aim to determine the angular diameter of beta Cep and resolve its close environment with a spatial resolution up to 1 mas level. Medium spectral resolution (R=6000) observations of beta Cep were secured with the VEGA instrument over the years 2008 and 2009. These observations were performed with the S1S2 (30m) and W1W2 (100m) baselines of the array. We investigated several models to reproduce our observations. A large-scale structure of a few mas is clearly detected around the star with a typical flux relative contribution of 0.23 +- 0.02. Our best model is a co-rotational geometrical thin ring around the star as predicted by magnetically-confined wind shock models. The ring inner diameter is 8.2 +- 0.8 mas and the width is 0.6 +- 0.7 mas. The orientation of the rotation axis on the plane of the sky is PA = 60 +- 1 deg, while the best fit of the mean angular diameter of beta Cep gives UD[V] = 0.22 +- 0.05 mas. Our data are compatible with the predicted position of the close companion of beta Cep. These results bring additional constraints on the fundamental parameters and on the future MHD and asteroseismological models of the star.
  • A crucial issue in star formation is to understand the physical mechanism by which mass is accreted onto and ejected by a young star. The visible spectrometer VEGA on the CHARA array can be an efficient means of probing the structure and the kinematics of the hot circumstellar gas at sub-AU. For the first time, we observed the Herbig Ae star AB Aur in the H$\alpha$ emission line, using the VEGA low spectral resolution on two baselines of the array. We computed and calibrated the spectral visibilities between 610 nm and 700 nm. To simultaneously reproduce the line profile and the visibility, we used a 1-D radiative transfer code that calculates level populations for hydrogen atoms in a spherical geometry and synthetic spectro-interferometric observables. We clearly resolved AB Aur in the H$\alpha$ line and in a part of the continuum, even at the smallest baseline of 34 m. The small P-Cygni absorption feature is indicative of an outflow but could not be explained by a spherical stellar wind model. Instead, it favors a magneto-centrifugal X-disk or disk-wind geometry. The fit of the spectral visibilities could not be accounted for by a wind alone, so we considered a brightness asymmetry possibly caused by large-scale nebulosity or by the known spiral structures, inducing a visibility modulation around H$\alpha$. Thanks to the unique capabilities of VEGA, we managed to simultaneously record for the first time a spectrum at a resolution of 1700 and spectral visibilities in the visible range on a target as faint as $m_{V}$ = 7.1. It was possible to rule out a spherical geometry for the wind of AB Aur and provide realistic solutions to account for the H$\alpha$ emission compatible with magneto-centrifugal acceleration. The study illustrates the advantages of optical interferometry and motivates observations of other bright young stars to shed light on the accretion/ejection processes.
  • We present infrared interferometric observations of the inner regions of two A-star debris disks, beta Leo and zeta Lep, using the FLUOR instrument at the CHARA interferometer on both short (30 m) and long (>200 m) baselines. For the target stars, the short baseline visibilities are lower than expected for the stellar photosphere alone, while those of a check star, delta Leo, are not. We interpret this visibility offset of a few percent as a near-infrared excess arising from dust grains which, due to the instrumental field of view, must be located within several AU of the central star. For beta Leo, the near-infrared excess producing grains are spatially distinct from the dust which produces the previously known mid-infrared excess. For zeta Lep, the near-infrared excess may be spatially associated with the mid-infrared excess producing material. We present simple geometric models which are consistent with the near and mid-infrared excess and show that for both objects, the near-infrared producing material is most consistent with a thin ring of dust near the sublimation radius with typical grain sizes smaller than the nominal radiation pressure blowout radius. Finally, we discuss possible origins of the near-infrared emitting dust in the context of debris disk evolution models.
  • We present comprehensive models for the Herbig Ae stars MWC275 and AB Aur that aim to explain their spectral energy distribution (from UV to millimeter) and long baseline interferometry (from near-infrared to millimeter) simultaneously. Data from the literature, combined with new mid-infrared (MIR) interferometry from the Keck Segment Tilting Experiment, are modeled using an axisymmetric Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Models in which most of the near-infrared (NIR) emission arises from a dust rim fail to fit the NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) and sub-milli-arcsecond NIR CHARA interferometry. Following recent work, we include an additional gas emission component with similar size scale to the dust rim, inside the sublimation radius, to fit the NIR SED and long-baseline NIR interferometry on MWC275 and AB Aur. In the absence of shielding of star light by gas, we show that the gas-dust transition region in these YSOs will have to contain highly refractory dust, sublimating at ~1850K. Despite having nearly identical structure in the thermal NIR, the outer disks of MWC275 and AB Aur differ substantially. In contrast to the AB Aur disk, MWC275 lacks small grains in the disk atmosphere capable of producing significant 10-20micron emission beyond ~7AU, forcing the outer regions into the "shadow" of the inner disk
  • We present the first resolved images of the eclipsing binary Beta Lyrae, obtained with the CHARA Array interferometer and the MIRC combiner in the H band. The images clearly show the mass donor and the thick disk surrounding the mass gainer at all six epochs of observation. The donor is brighter and generally appears elongated in the images, the first direct detection of photospheric tidal distortion due to Roche-lobe filling. We also confirm expectations that the disk component is more elongated than the donor and is relatively fainter at this wavelength. Image analysis and model fitting for each epoch were used for calculating the first astrometric orbital solution for Beta Lyrae, yielding precise values for the orbital inclination and position angle. The derived semi-ma jor axis also allows us to estimate the distance of Beta Lyrae; however, systematic differences between the models and the images limit the accuracy of our distance estimate to about 15%. To address these issues, we will need a more physical, self-consistent model to account for all epochs as well as the multi-wavelength information from the eclipsing light curves.