• In this paper, we study phase structure of a system of hard-core bosons with a nearest-neighbor (NN) repulsive interaction in a stacked triangular lattice. Hamiltonian of the system contains two parameters one of which is the hopping amplitude $t$ between NN sites and the other is the NN repulsion $V$. We investigate the system by means of the Monte-Carlo simulations and clarify the low and high-temperature phase diagrams. There exist solid states with density of boson $\rho={1 \over 3}$ and ${2\over 3}$, superfluid, supersolid and phase-separated state. The result is compared with the phase diagram of the two-dimensional system in a triangular lattice at vanishing temperature.
  • The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and the data transmitted to the ground are also described.
  • We present Chandra X-ray Observatory monitoring observations of the recent accretion outburst displayed by the pre-main sequence (pre-MS) star V1647 Ori. The X-ray observations were obtained over a period beginning prior to outburst onset in late 2003 and continuing through its apparent cessation in late 2005, and demonstrate that the mean flux of the spatially coincident X-ray source closely tracked the near-infrared luminosity of V1647 Ori throughout its eruption. We find negligible likelihood that the correspondence between X-ray and infrared light curves over this period was the result of multiple X-ray flares unrelated to the accretion burst. The recent Chandra data confirm that the X-ray spectrum of V1647 Ori hardened during outburst, relative both to its pre-outburst state and to the X-ray spectra of nearby pre-MS stars in the L1630 cloud. We conclude that the observed changes in the X-ray emission from V1647 Ori over the course of its 2003-2005 eruption were generated by a sudden increase and subsequent decline in its accretion rate. These results for V1647 Ori indicate that the flux of hard X-ray emission from erupting low-mass, pre-MS stars, and the duration and intensity of such eruptions, reflect the degree to which star-disk magnetic fields are reorganized before and during major accretion events.
  • We observed the main core F of the rho Ophiuchi cloud, an active star-forming region located at ~140 pc, using XMM-Newton with an exposure of 33 ks. We detect 87 X-ray sources within the 30' diameter field-of-view of the it EPIC imaging detector array. We cross-correlate the positions of XMM-Newton X-ray sources with previous X-ray and infrared (IR) catalogs: 25 previously unknown X-ray sources are found from our observation; 43 X-ray sources are detected by both XMM-Newton and Chandra; 68 XMM-Newton X-ray sources have 2MASS near-IR counterparts. We show that XMM-Newton and Chandra have comparable sensitivity for point source detection when the exposure time is set to ~30 ks for both. We detect X-ray emission from 7 Class I sources, 26 Class II sources, and 17 Class III sources. The X-ray detection rate of Class I sources is very high (64 %), which is consistent with previous Chandra observations in this area. We propose that 15 X-ray sources are new class III candidates, which doubles the number of known Class III sources, and helps to complete the census of YSOs in this area. We also detect X-ray emission from two young bona fide brown dwarfs, GY310 and GY141, out of three known in the field of view. GY141 appears brighter by nearly two orders of magnitude than in the Chandra observation. We extract X-ray light curves and spectra from these YSOs, and find some of them showed weak X-ray flares. We observed an X-ray flare from the bona fide brown dwarf GY310. We find as in the previous Chandra observation of this region that Class I sources tend to have higher temperatures and heavier X-ray absorptions than Class II and III sources.
  • We observed the HH24-26 region in the L1630 Orion molecular cloud complex with the X-ray observatory ASCA in the 0.5$-$10 keV band. X-ray emission was detected from the T Tauri star SSV61 and from the region where the Class I protostars SSV63E and SSV63W are located (hereafter SSV63E+W). The spectra of both SSV63E+W and SSV61 are well explained by an optically thin thermal plasma model. The spectrum of the T Tauri star SSV61 has a low temperature of $kT=0.9$ (0.7$-$1.2) keV and a moderate absorption of $N_{\rm{H}}=1.3$ (0.9$-$1.7) $\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$, while that of the protostar SSV63E+W has a high temperature of $kT=5.0$ (3.3$-$7.9) keV and a heavy absorption of $N_{\rm{H}}=1.5$ (1.2$-$1.8) $\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$. The X-ray light curve of SSV63E+W showed a flare during the observation. The peak flux reached about 9 times that of the quiescent flux. The temperature and the absorption column density do not change conspicuously during the flare. The 0.5$-$10 keV luminosity of SSV63E+W was about $1\times10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in the quiescent state. The present detection of hard X-rays from SSV63E+W is remarkable, because this is the first X-ray detection of a protostar in Orion.