• ABRIDGED- The UV-optical color magnitude diagram (CMD) of rich galaxy groups is characterised by a well developed Red Sequence (RS), a Blue Cloud (BC) and the so-called Green Valley (GV). Loose, less evolved groups of galaxies likely not virialized yet may lack a well defined RS. This is actually explained in the framework of galaxy evolution. We are focussing on understanding galaxy migration towards the RS, checking for signatures of such a transition in their photometric and morphological properties. We report on the UV properties of a sample of ETGs galaxies inhabiting the RS. The analysis of their structures, as derived by fitting a Sersic law to their UV luminosity profiles, suggests the presence of an underlying disk. This is the hallmark of dissipation processes that still must have a role in the evolution of this class of galaxies. SPH simulations with chemo-photometric implementations able to match the global properties of our targets are used to derive their evolutionary paths through UV-optical CDM, providing some fundamental information such as the crossing time through the GV, which depends on their luminosity. The transition from the BC to the RS takes several Gyrs, being about 3-5 Gyr for the the brightest galaxies and more long for fainter ones, if it occurs. The photometric study of nearby galaxy structures in UV is seriously hampered by either the limited FoV of the cameras (e.g in HST) or by the low spatial resolution of the images (e.g in the GALEX). Current missions equipped with telescopes and cameras sensitive to UV wavelengths, such as Swift-UVOT and Astrosat-UVIT, provide a relatively large FoV and better resolution than the GALEX. More powerful UV instruments (size, resolution and FoV) are obviously bound to yield fundamental advances in the accuracy and depth of the surface photometry and in the characterisation of the galaxy environment.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • This paper focuses on NGC 454, a nearby interacting pair of galaxies (AM0112-554, RR23), composed of an early-type (NGC 454 E) and a star forming late-type companion (NGC 454 W). We aim at characterizing this wet merger candidate via a multi-lambda analysis, from near-UV to optical using SWIFT-UVOT, and mapping the Halpha intensity (I) distribution, velocity (Vr), and velocity dispersion (sigma) fields with SAM+Perot-Fabry at SOAR observations. Luminosity profiles suggest that NGC 454 E is an S0. Distortions in its outskirts caused by the on-going interaction are visible in both optical and near-UV frames. In NGC 454 W, the NUV-UVOT images and the Halpha show a set of star forming complexes connected by a faint tail. Halpha emission is detected along the line connecting NGC 454 E to the NGC 454 main HII complex. We investigate the (I-sigma), (I-Vr ) (Vr-sigma) diagnostic diagrams of the HII complexes, most of which can be interpreted in a framework of expanding bubbles. In the main HII complex, enclosed in the UV brightest region, the gas velocity dispersion is highly supersonic reaching 60 km/s. However, Halpha emission profiles are mostly asymmetric indicating the presence of multiple components with an irregular kinematics. Observations point towards an advanced stage of the encounter. Our SPH simulations with chemophotometric implementation suggest that this mixed pair can be understood in terms of a 1:1 gas/halos encounter giving rise to a merger in about 0.2 Gyr from the present stage.
  • The advent of Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) systems marks the beginning of a new era in high spatial resolution imaging. The newly commissioned Gemini South Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) combined with the infrared camera Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI), delivers quasi diffraction-limited images over a field of 2 arc-minutes across. However, despite this excellent performance, some variable residues still limit the quality of the analyses. In particular, distortions severely affect GSAOI and become a critical issue for high-precision astrometry and photometry. In this paper, we investigate an optimal way to correct for the distortion following an inverse problem approach. Formalism as well as applications on GeMS data are presented.
  • Aims. The formation and properties of star clusters at the edge of H II regions are poorly known, partly due to limitations in angular resolution and sensitivity, which become particularly critical when dealing with extragalactic clusters. In this paper we study the stellar content and star-formation processes in the young N159W region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods. We investigate the star-forming sites in N159W at unprecedented spatial resolution using JHKs-band images obtained with the GeMS/GSAOI instrument on the Gemini South telescope. The typical angular resolution of the images is of 100 mas, with a limiting magnitude in H of 22 mag (90 percent completeness). Photometry from our images is used to identify candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in N159W. We also determine the H-band luminosity function of the star cluster at the centre of the H II region and use this to estimate its initial mass function (IMF). Results. We estimate an age of 2 + or - 1 Myr for the central cluster, with its IMF described by a power-law with an index of gamma = - 1.05 + or - 0.2 , and with a total estimated mass of 1300 solar mass. We also identify 104 candidate YSOs, which are concentrated in clumps and subclusters of stars, principally at the edges of the H II region. These clusters display signs of recent and active star-formation such as ultra-compact H II regions, and molecular outflows. This suggests that the YSOs are typically younger than the central cluster, pointing to sequential star-formation in N159W, which has probably been influenced by interactions with the expanding H II bubble.
  • We carried out a dynamical study of the galaxy cluster pair A3407 \& A3408 based on a spectroscopic survey obtained with the 4 meter Blanco telescope at the CTIO, plus 6dF data, and ROSAT All-Sky-Survey. The sample consists of 122 member galaxies brighter than $m_R=20$. Our main goal is to probe the galaxy dynamics in this field and verify if the sample constitutes a single galaxy system or corresponds to an ongoing merging process. Statistical tests were applied to clusters members showing that both the composite system A3407 + A3408 as well as each individual cluster have Gaussian velocity distribution. A velocity gradient of $\sim 847\pm 114$ $\rm km\;s^{-1}$ was identified around the principal axis of the projected distribution of galaxies, indicating that the global field may be rotating. Applying the KMM algorithm to the distribution of galaxies we found that the solution with two clusters is better than the single unit solution at the 99\% c.l. This is consistent with the X-ray distribution around this field, which shows no common X-ray halo involving A3407 and A3408. We also estimated virial masses and applied a two-body model to probe the dynamics of the pair. The more likely scenario is that in which the pair is gravitationally bound and probably experiences a collapse phase, with the cluster cores crossing in less than $\sim$1 $h^{-1}$ Gyr, a pre-merger scenario. The complex X-ray morphology, the gas temperature, and some signs of galaxy evolution in A3408 suggests a post-merger scenario, with cores having crossed each other $\sim 1.65 h^{-1}$Gyr ago, as an alternative solution.
  • We present new optical observations of the HH 111 Herbig-Haro jet using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in its Integral Field Unit mode. Eight fields of 5" x 3.5" have been positioned along and across the HH 111 jet, covering the spatial region from knot E to L in HH 111 (namely, knots E, F, G, H, J, K and L). We present images and velocity channel maps for the [O I] 6300+6360, Halpha, [N II] 6548+6583 and [S II] 6716+6730 lines, as well as for the [S II]6716/6730 line ratio. We find that the HH 111 jet has an inner region with lower excitation and higher radial velocity, surrounded by a broader region of higher excitation and lower radial velocity. Also, we find higher electron densities at lower radial velocities. These results imply that the HH 111 jet has a fast, axial region with lower velocity shocks surrounded by a lower velocity sheath with higher velocity shocks.
  • We present new Fabry-Perot observations for a sample of 42 galaxies located in twelve compact groups of galaxies: HCG 1, HCG 14, HCG 25, HCG 44, HCG 53, HCG 57, HCG 61, HCG 69, HCG 93, VV 304, LGG 455 and Arp 314. From the 42 observed galaxies, a total of 26 objects are spiral galaxies, which range from Sa to Im morphological types. The remaining 16 objects are E, S0 and S0a galaxies. Using these observations, we have derived velocity maps, monochromatic and velocity dispersion maps for 24 galaxies, where 18 are spiral, three are S0a, two are S0 and one is an Im galaxy. From the 24 velocity fields obtained, we could derive rotation curves for 15 galaxies; only two of them exhibit rotation curves without any clear signature of interactions. Based on kinematic information, we have evaluated the evolutionary stage of the different groups of the current sample. We identify groups that range from having no H$\alpha$ emission to displaying an extremely complex kinematics, where their members display strongly perturbed velocity fields and rotation curves. In the case of galaxies with no H$\alpha$ emission, we suggest that past galaxy interactions removed their gaseous components, thereby quenching their star formation. However, we can not discard that the lack of H$\alpha$ emission is linked with the detection limit for some of our observations.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • We used K-band photometry, maximum rotational velocities derived from Fabry-Perot data and HI observed and predicted masses to study, for the first time, the K-band, stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations for galaxies in Hickson compact groups. We compared these relations with the ones defined for galaxies in less dense environments from the GHASP survey and from a sample of gas-rich galaxies. We find that most of the Hickson compact group galaxies lie on the K-band Tully-Fisher relation defined by field galaxies with a few low-mass outliers, namely HCG 49b and HCG 96c, which appear to have had strong recent burst of star formation. The stellar Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies presents a similar dispersion to that of the K-band relation, and it has no significant outliers when a proper computation of the stellar mass is done for the strongly star-forming galaxies. The scatter in these relations can be reduced if the gaseous component is taken into account, i.e., if a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is considered. In order to explain the positions of the galaxies off the K-band Tully-Fisher relation we favour a scenario in which their luminosities are brightened due to strong star formation or AGN activity. We argue that strong bursts of star formation can affect the B and K-band luminosities of HCG 49b and HCG 96c and in the case of the latter also AGN activity may affect the K-band magnitude considerably, without affecting their total masses.
  • We present the photometric and kinematic characterization of two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 located in different regions of the Leo cloud. U268, composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (~24%) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 plus 8 new added members, with ~38% of ETGs. We find the presence of significant substructures in both groups suggesting that they are likely accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-UV and near-UV with GALEX, and in u,g, r, i, z (SDSS) bands. H_alpha imaging and 2D high resolution kinematical data have been obtained using PUMA Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 2.12 m telescope in San Pedro M\'artir, (Baja California, M\'exico). We improved the galaxy classification and we detected morphological and kinematical distortions that may be connected to either on-going and/or past interaction/accretion events or environmental induced secular evolution. U268 appears more active than U376, with a large fraction of galaxies showing interaction signatures (60% vs. 13%). The presence of bars among late-type galaxies is ~10% in U268 and ~$29% in U376. The cumulative distribution of (FUV - NUV) colours of galaxies in U268 is significantly different than that in U376 with galaxies in U268 bluer than those in U376. In the (FUV-r vs. M_r) and (NUV-r vs. M_r) planes no members of U268 are found in the `red sequence', even early-type galaxies lie in the `blue sequence' or in the `green valley'. Most (80%) of the early-type members in U376 inhabits the `red sequence, a large fraction of galaxies, of different morphological types, are located in the `green valley', while the `blue sequence' is under-populated with respect to U268.
  • We studied, for the first time, the near infrared, stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations for a sample of field galaxies taken from an homogeneous Fabry-Perot sample of galaxies (the GHASP survey). The main advantage of GHASP over other samples is that maximum rotational velocities were estimated from 2D velocity fields, avoiding assumptions about the inclination and position angle of the galaxies. By combining these data with 2MASS photometry, optical colors, HI masses and different mass-to-light ratio estimators, we found a slope of 4.48\pm0.38 and 3.64\pm0.28 for the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, respectively. We found that these values do not change significantly when different mass-to-light ratios recipes were used. We also point out, for the first time, that rising rotation curves as well as asymmetric rotation curves show a larger dispersion in the Tully-Fisher relation than flat ones or than symmetric ones. Using the baryonic mass and the optical radius of galaxies, we found that the surface baryonic mass density is almost constant for all the galaxies of this sample. In this study we also emphasize the presence of a break in the NIR Tully-Fisher relation at M(H,K)\sim-20 and we confirm that late-type galaxies present higher total-to-baryonic mass ratios than early-type spirals, suggesting that supernova feedback is actually an important issue in late-type spirals. Due to the well defined sample selection criteria and the homogeneity of the data analysis, the Tully-Fisher relation for GHASP galaxies can be used as a reference for the study of this relation in other environments and at higher redshifts.
  • We obtained new Fabry-Perot data cubes and derived velocity fields, monochromatic and velocity dispersion maps for 28 galaxies in the Hickson compact groups 37, 40, 47, 49, 54, 56, 68, 79 and 93. We find that one third of the non-barred compact group galaxies have position angle misalignments between the stellar and gaseous components. This and the asymmetric rotation curves are clear signatures of kinematic perturbations, probably due to interactions among compact group galaxies. A comparison between the B-band Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies and that for the GHASP field-galaxy sample shows that, despite the high fraction of compact group galaxies with asymmetric rotation curves, these lie on the Tully-Fisher relation defined by galaxies in less dense environments, although with more scatter. This is in agreement with previous results, but now confirmed for a larger sample of 41 galaxies. We confirm the tendency for compact group galaxies at the low-mass end of the Tully-Fisher relation (HCG 49b, 89d, 96c, 96d and 100c) to have either a magnitude that is too bright for its mass (suggesting brightening by star formation) and/or a low maximum rotational velocity for its luminosity (suggesting tidal stripping). These galaxies are outside the Tully Fisher relation, at the 1 sigma level, even when the minimum acceptable values of inclinations are used to compute their maximum velocities. The inclusion of such galaxies with v<100 km/s in the determination of the zero point and slope of the compact group B-band Tully-Fisher relation would strongly change the fit, making it different from the relation for field galaxies, a fact that has to be kept in mind when studying scaling relations of interacting galaxies, specially at high redshifts.
  • We present the results of a multiwavelength campaign searching for young objects in the intragroup medium of seven compact groups of galaxies: HCG 2, 7, 22, 23, 92, 100 and NGC 92. We used Fabry-Perot velocity fields and rotation curves together with GALEX NUV and FUV images, optical R-band and HI maps to evaluate the stage of interaction of each group. We conclude that groups (i) HCG 7 and HCG 23 are in an early stage of interaction, (ii) HCG 2 and HCG 22 are mildly interacting, and (iii) HCG 92, HCG 100 and NGC 92 are in a late stage of evolution. Evolved groups have a population of young objects in their intragroup medium while no such population is found within the less evolved groups. We also report the discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy candidate in the tail of NGC 92. These three groups, besides containing galaxies which have peculiar velocity fields, also show extended HI tails. Our results indicate that the advanced stage of evolution of a group together with the presence of intragroup HI clouds may lead to star formation in the intragroup medium.
  • This study presents the mass distribution for a sample of 18 late-type galaxies in nine Hickson Compact Groups. We used rotation curves from high resolution 2D velocity fields of Fabry-Perot observations and J-band photometry from the 2MASS survey, in order to determine the dark halo and the visible matter distributions. The study compares two halo density profile, an isothermal core-like distribution and a cuspy one. We also compare their visible and dark matter distributions with those of galaxies belonging to cluster and field galaxies coming from two samples: 40 cluster galaxies of Barnes et al (2004) and 35 field galaxies of Spano et al. (2008). The central halo surface density is found to be constant with respect to the total absolute magnitude similar to what is found for the isolated galaxies. This suggests that the halo density is independent to galaxy type and environment. We have found that core-like density profiles fit better the rotation curves than cuspy-like ones. No major differences have been found between field, cluster and compact group galaxies with respect to their dark halo density profiles.
  • Context: Compact groups of galaxies are entities that have high densities of galaxies and serve as laboratories to study galaxy interactions, intergalactic star formation and galaxy evolution. Aims: The main goal of this study is to search for young objects in the intragroup medium of seven compact groups of galaxies: HCG 2, 7, 22, 23, 92, 100 and NGC 92 as well as to evaluate the stage of interaction of each group. Methods: We used Fabry-Perot velocity fields and rotation curves together with GALEX NUV and FUV images and optical R-band and HI maps. Results: (i) HCG 7 and HCG 23 are in early stages of interaction, (ii) HCG 2 and HCG 22 are mildly interacting, and (iii) HCG 92, HCG 100 and NGC 92 are in late stages of evolution. We find that all three evolved groups contain populations of young blue objects in the intragroup medium, consistent with ages < 100 Myr, of which several are younger than < 10 Myr. We also report the discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy candidate in the tail of NGC 92. These three groups, besides containing galaxies that have peculiar velocity fields, also show extended HI tails. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the advanced stage of evolution of a group, together with the presence of intragroup HI clouds, may lead to star formation in the intragroup medium. A table containing all intergalactic HII regions and tidal dwarf galaxies confirmed to date is appended.
  • We present a multiwavelength study of the highly evolved compact galaxy group known as Seyfert's Sextet (HCG79: SS). We interpret SS as a 2-3 Gyr more evolved analog of Stephan's Quintet (HCG92: SQ). We postulate that SS formed by sequential acquisition of 4-5 primarily late-type field galaxies. Four of the five galaxies show an early-type morphology which is likely the result of secular evolution driven by gas stripping. Stellar stripping has produced a massive/luminous halo and embedded galaxies that are overluminous for their size. These are interpreted as remnant bulges of the accreted spirals. H79d could be interpreted as the most recent intruder being the only galaxy with an intact ISM and uncertain evidence for tidal perturbation. In addition to stripping activity we find evidence for past accretion events. H79b (NGC6027) shows a strong counter-rotating emission line component interpreted as an accreted dwarf spiral. H79a shows evidence for an infalling component of gas representing feedback or possible cross fueling by H79d. The biggest challenge to this scenario involves the low gas fraction in the group. If SS formed from normal field spirals then much of the gas is missing. Finally, despite its advanced stage of evolution, we find no evidence for major mergers and infer that SS (and SQ) are telling us that such groups coalesce via slow dissolution.
  • We investigate the properties of the B-band Tully-Fisher (T-F) relation for 25 compact group galaxies, using Vmax derived from 2-D velocity maps. Our main result is that the majority of the Hickson Compact Group galaxies lie on the T-F relation. However, about 20% of the galaxies, including the lowest-mass systems, have higher B luminosities for a given mass, or alternatively, a mass which is too low for their luminosities. We favour a scenario in which outliers have been brightened due to either enhanced star formation or merging. Alternatively, the T-F outliers may have undergone truncation of their dark halo due to interactions. It is possible that in some cases, both effects contribute. The fact that the B-band T-F relation is similar for compact group and field galaxies tells us that these galaxies show common mass-to-size relations and that the halos of compact group galaxies have not been significantly stripped inside R25. We find that 75% of the compact group galaxies studied (22 out of 29) have highly peculiar velocity fields. Nevertheless, a careful choice of inclination, position angle and center, obtained from the velocity field, and an average of the velocities over a large sector of the galaxy enabled the determination of fairly well-behaved rotation curves for the galaxies. However, two of the compact group galaxies which are the most massive members in M51--like pairs, HCG 91a and HCG 96a, have very asymmetric rotation curves, with one arm rising and the other one falling, indicating, most probably, a recent perturbation by the small close companions.
  • We present Fabry Perot observations of three Hickson Compact Groups, HCG 88, HCG 89 and HCG 100. We detect ionized gas in 15 group members, three of which were previously uncatalogued objects, two in HCG 89 and one in HCG 100. We were able to derive 2D velocity, monochromatic and continuum maps and rotation curves for a total of 12 giant late-type galaxies and two dwarf galaxies. Even with this small sample of three groups, we can clearly see a trend of kinematic evolution and the different evolutionary stages of the groups. The members of HCG 88 show almost no signs of previous or current interactions, while HCG 100 contains at least two merging and one strongly-interacting galaxies. HCG 89 shows members with signs of interactions and galaxies with normal kinematics. We therefore classify HCG 88, HCG 89 and HCG 100 respectively as an unevolved group, a mildly interacting group and a system in the final stage of evolution.
  • We present new observations of $H\alpha $ emission in the Hickson Compact Group 18 (HCG 18) obtained with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The velocity field does not show motions of individual group members but, instead, a complex common velocity field for the whole group. The gas distribution is very asymmetric with clumps of maximum intensity coinciding with the optically brightest knots. Comparing $H\alpha $ and HI data we conclude that HCG 18 is not a compact group but instead a large irregular galaxy with several clumps of star formation.
  • We present kinematic observations of H$\alpha$ emission for two early-type galaxies and one disk system, members of the Hickson compact group 90 (HCG 90) obtained with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and samplings of 16 $km$ $s^{-1}$ and 1$\arcsec$. Mapping of the gas kinematics was possible to $\sim$ 2 r$_{eff}$ for the disk galaxy N7174 and to $\sim$ 1.3 r$_{eff}$ and $\sim$ 1.7 r$_{eff}$ for the early-type galaxies N7176 and N7173 respectively. Evidence for ongoing interaction was found in the properties of the warm gas of the three galaxies, some of which do not have stellar counterparts. We suggest the following evolutionary scenario for the system. H90d is the warm gas reservoir of the group in process of fueling H90b with gas. H90c and d have experienced past interaction with gas exchange. The gas acquired by H90c has already settled and relaxed but the effects of the interaction can still be visible in the morphology of the two galaxies and their stellar kinematics. This process will possibly result in a major merger.