• Using a sample of 4 galaxy clusters at $1.35 < z < 1.65$ and 10 galaxy clusters at $0.85 < z < 1.35$, we measure the environmental quenching timescale, $t_Q$, corresponding to the time required after a galaxy is accreted by a cluster for it to fully cease star formation. Cluster members are selected by a photometric-redshift criterion, and categorized as star-forming, quiescent, or intermediate according to their dust-corrected rest-frame colors and magnitudes. We employ a "delayed-then-rapid" quenching model that relates a simulated cluster mass accretion rate to the observed numbers of each type of galaxy in the cluster to constrain $t_Q$. For galaxies of mass $M_* \gtrsim 10^{10.5}~ \mathrm{M}_\odot$, we find a quenching timescale of $t_Q=$ 1.24 Gyr in the $z\sim1.5$ cluster sample, and $t_Q=$ 1.50 Gyr at $z\sim1$. Using values drawn from the literature, we compare the redshift evolution of $t_Q$ to timescales predicted for different physical quenching mechanisms. We find $t_Q$ to depend on host halo mass such that quenching occurs over faster timescales in clusters relative to groups, suggesting that properties of the host halo are responsible for quenching high-mass galaxies. Between $z=0$ and $z=1.5$, we find that $t_Q$ evolves faster than the molecular gas depletion timescale and slower than an SFR-outflow timescale, but is consistent with the evolution of the dynamical time. This suggests that environmental quenching in these galaxies is driven by the motion of satellites relative to the cluster environment, although due to uncertainties in the atomic gas budget at high redshift, we cannot rule out quenching due to simple gas depletion.
  • Measuring and calibrating relations between cluster observables is critical for resource-limited studies. The mass-richness relation of clusters offers an observationally inexpensive way of estimating masses. Its calibration is essential for cluster and cosmological studies, especially for high-redshift clusters. Weak gravitational lensing magnification is a promising and complementary method to shear studies, that can be applied at higher redshifts. We employed the weak lensing magnification method to calibrate the mass-richness relation up to a redshift of 1.4. We used the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) galaxy cluster candidates ($0.2<z<1.4$) and optical data from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) to test whether magnification can be effectively used to constrain the mass of high-redshift clusters. Lyman-Break Galaxies (LBGs) selected using the $u$-band dropout technique and their colours were used as a background sample of sources. LBG positions were cross-correlated with the centres of the sample of SpARCS clusters to estimate the magnification signal measured for cluster sub-samples, binned in both redshift and richness. We detected a weak lensing magnification signal for all bins at a detection significance of 2.6-5.5$\sigma$. In particular, the significance of the measurement for clusters with $z>1.0$ is 4.1$\sigma$; for the entire cluster sample we obtained an average M$_{200}$ of $1.28^{+0.23}_{-0.21}$ $\times 10^{14} \, \textrm{M}_{\odot}$. Our measurements demonstrated the feasibility of using weak lensing magnification as a viable tool for determining the average halo masses for samples of high redshift galaxy clusters. The results also established the success of using galaxy over-densities to select massive clusters at $z > 1$. Additional studies are necessary for further modelling of the various systematic effects we discussed.
  • We present ALMA CO (2-1) detections in 11 gas-rich cluster galaxies at z~1.6, constituting the largest sample of molecular gas measurements in z>1.5 clusters to date. The observations span three galaxy clusters, derived from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey. We augment the >5sigma detections of the CO (2-1) fluxes with multi-band photometry, yielding stellar masses and infrared-derived star formation rates, to place some of the first constraints on molecular gas properties in z~1.6 cluster environments. We measure sizable gas reservoirs of 0.5-2x10^11 solar masses in these objects, with high gas fractions and long depletion timescales, averaging 62% and 1.4 Gyr, respectively. We compare our cluster galaxies to the scaling relations of the coeval field, in the context of how gas fractions and depletion timescales vary with respect to the star-forming main sequence. We find that our cluster galaxies lie systematically off the field scaling relations at z=1.6 toward enhanced gas fractions, at a level of ~4sigma, but have consistent depletion timescales. Exploiting CO detections in lower-redshift clusters from the literature, we investigate the evolution of the gas fraction in cluster galaxies, finding it to mimic the strong rise with redshift in the field. We emphasize the utility of detecting abundant gas-rich galaxies in high-redshift clusters, deeming them as crucial laboratories for future statistical studies.
  • We report the detection of CO(2-1) emission coincident with the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) of the high-redshift galaxy cluster SpARCS1049+56, with the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR) on the Large Millimetre Telescope (LMT). We confirm a spectroscopic redshift for the gas of z = 1.7091+/-0.0004, which is consistent with the systemic redshift of the cluster galaxies of z = 1.709. The line is well-fit by a single component Gaussian with a RSR resolution-corrected FWHM of 569+/-63 km/s. We see no evidence for multiple velocity components in the gas, as might be expected from the multiple image components seen in near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure the integrated flux of the line to be 3.6+/-0.3 Jy km/s and, using alpha_CO = 0.8 Msun (K km s^-1 pc^2)^-1 we estimate a total molecular gas mass of 1.1+/-0.1x10^11 Msun and a M_H2/M_star ~ 0.4. This is the largest gas reservoir detected in a BCG above z > 1 to date. Given the infrared-estimated star formation rate of 860+/-130 Msun/yr, this corresponds to a gas depletion timescale of ~0.1Gyr. We discuss several possible mechanisms for depositing such a large gas reservoir to the cluster center -- e.g., a cooling flow, a major galaxy-galaxy merger or the stripping of gas from several galaxies -- but conclude that these LMT data are not sufficient to differentiate between them.
  • We present the results of a Spitzer/Herschel infrared photometric analysis of the largest (716) and highest-redshift (z=1.8) sample of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), those from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). Given the tension that exists between model predictions and recent observations of BCGs at z<2, we aim to uncover the dominant physical mechanism(s) guiding the stellar-mass buildup of this special class of galaxies, the most massive in the Universe uniquely residing at the centres of galaxy clusters. Through a comparison of their stacked, broadband, infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a variety of SED model templates in the literature, we identify the major sources of their infrared energy output, in multiple redshift bins between 0 < z < 1.8. We derive estimates of various BCG physical parameters from the stacked {\nu}L{\nu} SEDs, from which we infer a star-forming, as opposed to a 'red and dead' population of galaxies, producing tens to hundreds of solar masses per year down to z=0.5. This discovery challenges the accepted belief that BCGs should only passively evolve through a series of gas-poor, minor mergers since z~4 (De Lucia & Blaizot 2007), but agrees with the improved semi-analytic model of hierarchical structure formation of Tonini et al. (2012), which predicts star-forming BCGs throughout the epoch considered. We attribute the star formation inferred from the stacked infrared SEDs to both major and minor 'wet' (gas-rich) mergers, based on a lack of key signatures (to date) of the cluster cooling flows to which BCG star formation is typically attributed, as well as a number of observational and simulation-based studies that support this scenario.
  • We present an extensive spectroscopic follow-up campaign of 29 strong lensing (SL) selected galaxy clusters discovered primarily in the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-2). Our spectroscopic analysis yields redshifts for 52 gravitational arcs present in the core of our galaxy clusters, which correspond to 35 distinct background sources that are clearly distorted by the gravitational potential of these clusters. These lensed galaxies span a wide redshift range of $0.8 \le z \le 2.9$, with a median redshift of $z_s = 1.8 \pm 0.1 $. We also measure reliable redshifts for 1004 cluster members, allowing us to obtain robust velocity dispersion measurements for 23 of these clusters, which we then use to determine their dynamical masses by using a simulation-based $\sigma_{DM} - M_{200}$ scaling relation. The redshift and mass ranges covered by our SL sample are $0.22 \le z \le 1.01$ and $5 \times10^{13} \le M_{200}/h^{-1}_{70}M_{\odot} \le 1.9\times10^{15}$, respectively. We analyze and quantify some possible effects that might bias our mass estimates, such as the presence of substructure, the region where cluster members are selected for spectroscopic follow-up, the final number of confirmed members, and line-of-sight effects. We find that 10 clusters of our sample with $N_{mem} \gtrsim 20$ show signs of dynamical substructure. However, the velocity data of only one system is inconsistent with a uni-modal distribution. We therefore assume that the substructures are only marginal and not of comparable size to the clusters themselves. Consequently, our velocity dispersion and mass estimates can be used as priors for SL mass reconstruction studies and also represent an important step toward a better understanding of the properties of the SL galaxy cluster population.
  • We constrain the internal dynamics of a stack of 10 clusters from the GCLASS survey at 0.87<z<1.34. We determine the stack cluster mass profile M(r) using the MAMPOSSt algorithm of Mamon et al., the velocity anisotropy profile beta(r) from the inversion of the Jeans equation, and the pseudo-phase-space density profiles Q(r) and Qr(r), obtained from the ratio between the mass density profile and the third power of the (total and, respectively, radial) velocity dispersion profiles of cluster galaxies. Several M(r) models are statistically acceptable for the stack cluster (Burkert, Einasto, Hernquist, NFW). The total mass distribution has a concentration c=r200/r-2=4.0-0.6+1.0, in agreement with theoretical expectations, and is less concentrated than the cluster stellar-mass distribution. The stack cluster beta(r) is similar for passive and star-forming galaxies and indicates isotropic galaxy orbits near the cluster center and increasingly radially elongated with increasing cluster-centric distance. Q(r) and Qr(r) are almost power-law relations with slopes similar to those predicted from numerical simulations of dark matter halos. Combined with results obtained for lower-z clusters we determine the dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters, and compare it with theoretical predictions. We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for the differential evolution of total and stellar mass concentrations, and of passive and star-forming galaxy orbits [abridged].
  • We study a sample of ~10^4 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.2<z<0.8 with masses M_200 > 5x10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun, discovered in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). The depth and excellent image quality of the RCS2 enable us to detect the cluster-mass cross-correlation up to z~0.7. To obtain cluster masses, concentrations and halo biases, we fit a cluster halo model simultaneously to the lensing signal and to the projected density profile of red-sequence cluster members, as the latter provides tight constraints on the cluster miscentring distribution. We parametrise the mass-richness relation as M_200 = A x (N_200/20)^alpha, and find A = (15.0 +- 0.8) x 10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun and alpha = 0.73 +- 0.07 at low redshift (0.2<z<0.35). At intermediate redshift (0.35<z<0.55), we find a higher normalisation, which points at a fractional increase of the richness towards lower redshift caused by the build-up of the red-sequence. The miscentring distribution is well constrained. Only ~30% of our BCGs coincide with the peak of the dark matter distribution. The distribution of the remaining BCGs are modelled with a 2D-Gaussian, whose width increases from 0.2 to 0.4 h_70^-1 Mpc towards higher masses; the ratio of width and r_200 is constant with mass and has an average value of 0.44 +- 0.01. The mass-concentration and mass-bias relation agree fairly well with literature results at low redshift, but have a higher normalisation at higher redshifts, which may be due to selection and projection effects. The concentration of the satellite distribution decreases with mass and is correlated with the concentration of the halo.
  • We present an initial study of the mass and evolutionary state of a massive and distant cluster, RCS2 J232727.6-020437. This cluster, at z=0.6986, is the richest cluster discovered in the RCS2 project. The mass measurements presented in this paper are derived from all possible mass proxies: X-ray measurements, weak-lensing shear, strong lensing, Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect decrement, the velocity distribution of cluster member galaxies, and galaxy richness. While each of these observables probe the mass of the cluster at a different radius, they all indicate that RCS2 J232727.6-020437 is among the most massive clusters at this redshift, with an estimated mass of M_200 ~3 x10^15 h^-1 Msun. In this paper, we demonstrate that the various observables are all reasonably consistent with each other to within their uncertainties. RCS2 J232727.6-020437 appears to be well relaxed -- with circular and concentric X-ray isophotes, with a cool core, and no indication of significant substructure in extensive galaxy velocity data.
  • We place the most robust constraint to date on the scale of the turnover in the cosmological matter power spectrum using data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find this feature to lie at a scale of $k_0=0.0160^{+0.0041}_{-0.0035}$ [h/Mpc] (68% confidence) for an effective redshift of 0.62 and obtain from this the first-ever turnover-derived distance and cosmology constraints: a measure of the cosmic distance-redshift relation in units of the horizon scale at the redshift of radiation-matter equality (r_H) of D_V(z=0.62)/r_H=18.3 (+6.3/-3.3) and, assuming a prior on the number of extra relativistic degrees of freedom $N_{eff}=3$, constraints on the matter density parameter $\Omega_Mh^2=0.136^{+0.026}_{-0.052}$ and on the redshift of matter-radiation equality $z_{eq}=3274^{+631}_{-1260}$. All results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of standard LCDM models. Our constraints on the logarithmic slope of the power spectrum on scales larger than the turnover is bounded in the lower limit with values only as low as -1 allowed, with the prediction of standard LCDM models easily accommodated by our results. Lastly, we generate forecasts for the achievable precision of future surveys at constraining $k_0$, $\Omega_Mh^2$, $z_{eq}$ and $N_{eff}$. We find that BOSS should substantially improve upon the WiggleZ turnover constraint, reaching a precision on $k_0$ of $\pm$9% (68% confidence), translating to precisions on $\Omega_Mh^2$ and $z_{eq}$ of $\pm$10% (assuming a prior $N_{eff}=3$) and on $N_{eff}$ of (+78/-56)% (assuming a prior $\Omega_Mh^2=0.135$). This is sufficient precision to sharpen the constraints on $N_{eff}$ from WMAP, particularly in its upper limit. For Euclid, we find corresponding attainable precisions on $(k_0, \Omega_Mh^2, N_eff)$ of (3,4,+17/-21)%. This represents a precision approaching our forecasts for the Planck Surveyor.
  • We present a five-band Herschel study (100-500um) of three galaxy clusters at z~1.2 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). With a sample of 120 spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we investigate the role of environment on galaxy properties utilizing the projected cluster phase space (line-of-sight velocity versus clustercentric radius), which probes the time-averaged galaxy density to which a galaxy has been exposed. We divide cluster galaxies into phase-space bins of (r/r200) x (v/sigma_v), tracing a sequence of accretion histories in phase space. Stacking optically star-forming cluster members on the Herschel maps, we measure average infrared star formation rates, and, for the first time in high-redshift galaxy clusters, dust temperatures for dynamically distinct galaxy populations---namely, recent infalls and those that were accreted onto the cluster at an earlier epoch. Proceeding from the infalling to virialized (central) regions of phase space, we find a steady decrease in the specific star formation rate and increase in the stellar age of star-forming cluster galaxies. We perform a probability analysis to investigate all acceptable infrared spectral energy distributions within the full parameter space and measure a ~4 sigma drop in the average dust temperature of cluster galaxies in an intermediate phase-space bin, compared to an otherwise flat trend with phase space. We suggest one plausible quenching mechanism which may be consistent with these trends, invoking ram-pressure stripping of the warmer dust for galaxies within this intermediate accretion phase.
  • We present the results of a MIPS-24um study of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) of 535 high-redshift galaxy clusters. The clusters are drawn from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS), which effectively provides a sample selected on total stellar mass, over 0.2 < z < 1.8 within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey fields. 20%, or 106 clusters have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and the rest have redshifts estimated from the color of their red sequence. A comparison with the public SWIRE images detects 125 individual BCGs at 24um > 100uJy, or 23%. The luminosity-limited detection rate of BCGs in similar richness clusters (Ngal> 12) increases rapidly with redshift. Above z ~ 1, an average of ~20\% of the sample have 24um-inferred infrared luminosities of LIR > 10^12 Lsun, while the fraction below z ~ 1 exhibiting such luminosities is < 1 \%. The Spitzer-IRAC colors indicate the bulk of the 24um-detected population is predominantly powered by star formation, with only 7/125 galaxies lying within the color region inhabited by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Simple arguments limit the star-formation activity to several hundred million years and this may therefore be indicative of the timescale for AGN feedback to halt the star formation. Below redshift z ~ 1 there is not enough star formation to significantly contribute to the overall stellar mass of the BCG population, and therefore BCG growth is likely dominated by dry-mergers. Above z~ 1, however, the inferred star formation would double the stellar mass of the BCGs and is comparable to the mass assembly predicted by simulations through dry mergers. We cannot yet constrain the process driving the star formation for the overall sample, though a single object studied in detail is consistent with a gas-rich merger.
  • Observations consistently show that elliptical galaxies follow a tight "fundamental plane" scaling relation between size, mean surface brightness and velocity dispersion, with the form $R \propto \sigma^{a}\mu^{b}$. This relation not only has very small (<0.05 dex) intrinsic scatter, but also has significantly different coefficients from the expected virial scaling (a "tilt"). We analyze hundreds of simulations of elliptical galaxies formed from mergers of spiral galaxies in groups to determine if the fundamental plane can emerge from multiple, mostly minor and hierarchical collisionless mergers. We find that these simulated ellipticals lie on a similar fundamental plane with $a \approx 1.7$ and $b \approx 0.3$. The scatter about this plane is not larger than observed, while the tilt is in the correct sense, although $a$ is larger than for typical observations. This supports the idea that collisionless mergers can contribute significantly to the tilt of the fundamental plane. The tilt is mainly driven by a mass-dependent dark matter fraction, such that more massive galaxies have larger dark matter fractions within $R_{e}$. We further discuss the origin of this mass-dependent dark matter fraction and its compatibility with strong lensing observations, as well as the links between the fundamental plane, dynamical masses and the virial theorem.
  • We present significant improvements in cosmic distance measurements from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, achieved by applying the reconstruction of the baryonic acoustic feature technique. We show using both data and simulations that the reconstruction technique can often be effective despite patchiness of the survey, significant edge effects and shot-noise. We investigate three redshift bins in the redshift range 0.2<$z$<1, and in all three find improvement after reconstruction in the detection of the baryonic acoustic feature and its usage as a standard ruler. We measure model independent distance measures $D_{\mathrm V}(r_{\mathrm s}^\mathrm{fid}/r_{\mathrm s})$ of 1716 $\pm$ 83 Mpc, 2221 $\pm$ 101 Mpc, 2516 $\pm$ 86 Mpc (68% CL) at effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.6, 0.73, respectively, where $D_{\mathrm V}$ is the volume-average-distance, and $r_{\mathrm s}$ is the sound horizon at the end of the baryon drag epoch. These significantly improved 4.8, 4.5 and 3.4 percent accuracy measurements are equivalent to those expected from surveys with up to 2.5 times the volume of WiggleZ. These measurements are fully consistent with cosmologies allowed by the analyses of the Planck Collaboration and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.We provide the $D_{\mathrm V}(r_{\mathrm s}^\mathrm{fid}/r_{\mathrm s})$ posterior probability distributions and their covariances. When combining these measurements with temperature fluctuations measurements of Planck, the polarization of WMAP9, and the 6dF Galaxy Survey baryonic acoustic feature, we do not detect deviations from a flat LCDM model. Assuming this model we constrain the current expansion rate to $H_0$ = 67.15 $\pm$ 0.98 kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy to vary we obtain $w_\mathrm{DE}$ = -1.080 $\pm$ 0.135. When assuming a curved LCDM model we obtain a curvature value of $\Omega_{\mathrm K}$ = -0.0043 $\pm$ 0.0047.
  • We study the stellar mass content of massive haloes in the redshift range 0.86<z<1.34, by measuring: (1) The stellar mass in the central galaxy versus total dynamical halo mass. (2) The total stellar mass (including satellites) versus total halo mass. (3) The radial stellar mass and number density profiles for the ensemble halo. We use a Ks-band selected catalogue for the 10 clusters in the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS), with photometric redshifts and stellar masses measured from 11-band SED fitting. Combining the photometric catalogues with the deep spectroscopic component of GCLASS, we correct the cluster galaxy sample for interlopers. We also perform a dynamical analysis of the cluster galaxies to estimate the halo mass M200 for each cluster based on a measurement of its velocity dispersion. (1) We find that the central galaxy stellar mass fraction decreases with total halo mass, and that this is in reasonable quantitative agreement with measurements from abundance matching studies at z~1. (2) The total stellar mass fractions of these systems decrease with halo mass, indicating that lower mass systems are more efficient at transforming baryons into stars. We find the total stellar mass to be a good proxy for total halo mass, with a small intrinsic scatter. When we compare these results with literature measurements, we find that the stellar mass fraction at fixed halo mass shows no significant evolution in the range 0<z<1. (3) We measure a relatively high NFW concentration parameter c ~ 7 for the stellar mass distribution in these clusters. A simple model shows that the stellar mass content of GCLASS can evolve in typical distributions observed at lower redshifts if the clusters primarily accrete stellar mass onto the outskirts. [Abridged]
  • We present collisionless simulations of dry mergers in groups of three to twenty-five galaxies to test the hypothesis that elliptical galaxies form at the centers of such groups. Mock observations of the central remnants confirm their similarity to ellipticals, despite having no dissipational component. We vary the profile of the original spiral's bulge and find that ellipticals formed from spirals with exponential bulges have too low Sersic indices. Mergers of spirals with de Vaucouleurs (classical) bulges produce remnants with larger Sersic indices correlated with luminosity, as with SDSS ellipticals. Exponential bulge mergers are better fits to faint ellipticals, whereas classical bulge mergers better match luminous ellipticals. Similarly, luminous ellipticals are better reproduced by remnants undergoing many (>5) mergers, and fainter ellipticals by those with fewer mergers. The remnants follow tight size-luminosity and velocity dispersion-luminosity (Faber-Jackson) relations (<0.12 dex scatter), demonstrating that stochastic merging can produce tight scaling relations if the merging galaxies also follow tight scaling relations. The slopes of the size-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations are close to observations but slightly shallower in the former case. Both relations' intercepts are offset - remnants are too large but have too low dispersions at fixed luminosity. Some remnants show substantial (v/\sigma > 0.1) rotational support, although most are slow rotators and few are very fast rotators (v/\sigma > 0.5). These findings contrast with previous studies concluding that dissipation necessary to produce ellipticals from binary mergers of spirals. Multiple, mostly minor and dry mergers can produce bright ellipticals, whereas significant dissipation could be required to produce faint, rapidly-rotating ellipticals.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of galaxies from the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey with measured spectroscopic redshifts from the first data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. This sample selects galaxies with high star formation rates: at 0.6 < z < 0.9 the median star formation rate is at the upper 95th percentile of optically-selected (r<22.5) galaxies and the sample contains about 50 per cent of all NUV < 22.8, 0.6 < z < 0.9 starburst galaxies within the volume sampled. The most luminous galaxies in our sample (-21.0>M_NUV>-22.5) evolve very rapidly with a number density declining as (1+z)^{5\pm 1} from redshift z = 0.9 to z = 0.6. These starburst galaxies (M_NUV<-21 is approximately a star formation rate of 30 \msuny) contribute about 1 per cent of cosmic star formation over the redshift range z=0.6 to z=0.9. The star formation rate density of these very luminous galaxies evolves rapidly, as (1+z)^{4\pm 1}. Such a rapid evolution implies the majority of star formation in these large galaxies must have occurred before z = 0.9. We measure the UV luminosity function in 0.05 redshift intervals spanning 0.1<z<0.9, and provide analytic fits to the results. At all redshifts greater than z=0.55 we find that the bright end of the luminosity function is not well described by a pure Schechter function due to an excess of very luminous (M_NUV<-22) galaxies. These luminosity functions can be used to create a radial selection function for the WiggleZ survey or test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we test the AGN feedback model in Scannapieco et al. (2005), and find that this AGN feedback model requires AGN feedback efficiency to vary with one or more of the following: stellar mass, star formation rate and redshift.
  • We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies from observations of 10 rich clusters in the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS) in the redshift range 0.86<z<1.34. We compare our results with field measurements at similar redshifts using data from a Ks-band selected catalogue of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. We construct a Ks-band selected multi-colour catalogue for the clusters in 11 photometric bands covering u-8um, and estimate photometric redshifts and stellar masses using SED fitting techniques. To correct for interlopers in our cluster sample, we use the deep spectroscopic component of GCLASS, which contains spectra for 1282 identified cluster and field galaxies taken with Gemini/GMOS. Both the photometric and spectroscopic samples are sufficiently deep that we can probe the SMF down to masses of 10^10 Msun. We distinguish between star-forming and quiescent galaxies using the rest-frame U-V versus V-J diagram, and find that the best-fitting Schechter parameters alpha and M* are similar within the uncertainties for these galaxy types within the different environments. However, there is a significant difference in the shape and normalisation of the total SMF between the clusters and the field sample. This difference in the total SMF is primarily a reflection of the increased fraction of quiescent galaxies in high-density environments. We apply a simple quenching model that includes components of mass- and environment-driven quenching, and find that in this picture 45% of the star-forming galaxies, which normally would be forming stars in the field, are quenched by the cluster. If galaxies in clusters and the field quench their star formation via different mechanisms, these processes have to conspire in such a way that the shapes of the quiescent and star-forming SMF remain similar in these different environments.
  • Higher-order statistics are a useful and complementary tool for measuring the clustering of galaxies, containing information on the non-gaussian evolution and morphology of large-scale structure in the Universe. In this work we present measurements of the three-point correlation function (3PCF) for 187,000 galaxies in the WiggleZ spectroscopic galaxy survey. We explore the WiggleZ 3PCF scale and shape dependence at three different epochs z=0.35, 0.55 and 0.68, the highest redshifts where these measurements have been made to date. Using N-body simulations to predict the clustering of dark matter, we constrain the linear and non-linear bias parameters of WiggleZ galaxies with respect to dark matter, and marginalise over them to obtain constraints on sigma_8(z), the variance of perturbations on a scale of 8 Mpc/h and its evolution with redshift. These measurements of sigma_8(z), which have 10-20% accuracies, are consistent with the predictions of the LCDM concordance cosmology and test this model in a new way.
  • The growth history of large-scale structure in the Universe is a powerful probe of the cosmological model, including the nature of dark energy. We study the growth rate of cosmic structure to redshift $z = 0.9$ using more than $162{,}000$ galaxy redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We divide the data into four redshift slices with effective redshifts $z = [0.2,0.4,0.6,0.76]$ and in each of the samples measure and model the 2-point galaxy correlation function in parallel and transverse directions to the line-of-sight. After simultaneously fitting for the galaxy bias factor we recover values for the cosmic growth rate which are consistent with our assumed $\Lambda$CDM input cosmological model, with an accuracy of around 20% in each redshift slice. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the details of the assumed model and the range of physical scales fitted, making close comparison with a set of N-body simulations for calibration. Our measurements are consistent with an independent power-spectrum analysis of a similar dataset, demonstrating that the results are not driven by systematic errors. We determine the pairwise velocity dispersion of the sample in a non-parametric manner, showing that it systematically increases with decreasing redshift, and investigate the Alcock-Paczynski effects of changing the assumed fiducial model on the results. Our techniques should prove useful for current and future galaxy surveys mapping the growth rate of structure using the 2-dimensional correlation function.
  • We characterise the stellar masses and star formation rates in a sample of almost 40000 spectroscopically confirmed UV luminous galaxies at 0.3<z<1.0 selected from within the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. In particular, we match this UV bright population to wide-field infrared surveys such as the near infrared UKIDSS LAS and the mid infrared WISE All-Sky Survey. We find that ~30% of the UV luminous WiggleZ galaxies are detected at >5sigma in the UKIDSS-LAS at all redshifts. An even more luminous subset of 15% are also detected in the WISE 3.4 and 4.6um bands. We compute stellar masses for this very large sample of extremely blue galaxies and quantify the sensitivity of the stellar mass estimates to various assumptions made during the SED fitting. The median stellar masses are log10(M*/M0)=9.6\pm0.7, 10.2\pm0.5 and 10.4\pm0.4 for the IR-undetected, UKIDSS detected and UKIDSS+WISE detected galaxies respectively. We demonstrate that the inclusion of NIR photometry can lead to tighter constraints on the stellar masses. The mass estimates are found to be most sensitive to the inclusion of secondary bursts of star formation as well as changes in the stellar population synthesis models, both of which can lead to median discrepancies of the order of 0.3dex in the stellar masses. We find that the best-fit M/LK is significantly lower (by ~0.4 dex) than that predicted by simple optical colour based estimators, in particular for the bluer galaxies with younger best-fit ages. The WiggleZ galaxies have star formation rates of 3-10 M0/yr and mostly lie at the upper end of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at these redshifts. Their rest-frame UV luminosities and stellar masses are comparable to both local compact UV-luminous galaxies as well as Lyman break galaxies at z~2-3.(abridged)
  • We present the results of a weak gravitational lensing analysis to determine whether the stellar mass or the velocity dispersion is more closely related to the amplitude of the lensing signal around galaxies - and hence to the projected distribution of dark matter. The lensing signal on scales smaller than the virial radius corresponds most closely to the lensing velocity dispersion in the case of a singular isothermal profile, but is on larger scales also sensitive to the clustering of the haloes. We select over 4000 lens galaxies at a redshift z<0.2 with concentrated (or bulge-dominated) surface brightness profiles from the ~300 square degree overlap between the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2) and the data release 7 (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We consider both the spectroscopic velocity dispersion and a model velocity dispersion (a combination of the stellar mass, the size and the Sersic index of a galaxy). Comparing the model and spectroscopic velocity dispersion we find that they correlate well for galaxies with concentrated brightness profiles. We find that the stellar mass and the spectroscopic velocity dispersion trace the amplitude of the lensing signal on small scales equally well. The model velocity dispersion, however, does significantly worse. A possible explanation is that the halo properties that determine the small-scale lensing signal - mainly the total mass - also depend on the structural parameters of galaxies, such as the effective radius and Sersic index, but we lack data for a definitive conclusion.
  • This paper presents cosmological results from the final data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We perform full analyses of different cosmological models using the WiggleZ power spectra measured at z=0.22, 0.41, 0.60, and 0.78, combined with other cosmological datasets. The limiting factor in this analysis is the theoretical modelling of the galaxy power spectrum, including non-linearities, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortions. In this paper we assess several different methods for modelling the theoretical power spectrum, testing them against the Gigaparsec WiggleZ simulations (GiggleZ). We fit for a base set of 6 cosmological parameters, {Omega_b h^2, Omega_CDM h^2, H_0, tau, A_s, n_s}, and 5 supplementary parameters {n_run, r, w, Omega_k, sum m_nu}. In combination with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), our results are consistent with the LambdaCDM concordance cosmology, with a measurement of the matter density of Omega_m =0.29 +/- 0.016 and amplitude of fluctuations sigma_8 = 0.825 +/- 0.017. Using WiggleZ data with CMB and other distance and matter power spectra data, we find no evidence for any of the extension parameters being inconsistent with their LambdaCDM model values. The power spectra data and theoretical modelling tools are available for use as a module for CosmoMC, which we here make publicly available at http://smp.uq.edu.au/wigglez-data . We also release the data and random catalogues used to construct the baryon acoustic oscillation correlation function.
  • We study the shapes of galaxy dark matter haloes by measuring the anisotropy of the weak gravitational lensing signal around galaxies in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). We determine the average shear anisotropy within the virial radius for three lens samples: all galaxies with 19<m_r'<21.5, and the `red' and `blue' samples, whose lensing signals are dominated by massive low-redshift early-type and late-type galaxies, respectively. To study the environmental dependence of the lensing signal, we separate each lens sample into an isolated and clustered part and analyse them separately. We also measure the azimuthal dependence of the distribution of physically associated galaxies around the lens samples. We find that these satellites preferentially reside near the major axis of the lenses, and constrain the angle between the major axis of the lens and the average location of the satellites to <theta>=43.7 deg +/- 0.3 deg for the `all' lenses, <theta>=41.7 deg +/- 0.5 deg for the `red' lenses and <theta>=42.0 deg +/- 1.4 deg for the `blue' lenses. For the `all' sample, we find that the anisotropy of the galaxy-mass cross-correlation function <f-f_45>=0.23 +/- 0.12, providing weak support for the view that the average galaxy is embedded in, and preferentially aligned with, a triaxial dark matter halo. Assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we find that the ratio of the dark matter halo ellipticity and the galaxy ellipticity f_h=e_h/e_g=1.50+1.03-1.01, which for a mean lens ellipticity of 0.25 corresponds to a projected halo ellipticity of e_h=0.38+0.26-0.25 if the halo and the lens are perfectly aligned. For isolated galaxies of the `all' sample, the average shear anisotropy increases to <f-f_45>=0.51+0.26-0.25 and f_h=4.73+2.17-2.05, whilst for clustered galaxies the signal is consistent with zero. (abridged)
  • We present a submillimetre survey of seven high-z galaxy clusters (0.64<z<1.0) using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) at 850 and 450 um. The targets, of similar richness and redshift, are selected from the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). We use this sample to investigate the apparent excess of submillimetre source counts in the direction of cluster fields compared to blank fields. The sample consists of three galaxy clusters that exhibit multiple optical arcs due to strong gravitational lensing, and a control group of four clusters with no apparent strong lensing. A tentative excess of 2.7-sigma is seen in the number density of submillimetre luminous galaxies (SMGs) within the lensing cluster fields compared to that in the control group. Ancillary observations at radio, mid-infrared, optical, and X-ray wavelengths allow for the identification of counterparts to many of the SMGs. Utilizing photometric redshifts, we conclude that at least three of the galaxies within the lensing fields have redshifts consistent with the clusters and implied infrared luminosities of ~10^12 Lsol. The existence of SMG cluster members may therefore be boosting source counts in the lensing cluster fields, which might be an effect of the dynamical state of those clusters. However, we find that the removal of potential cluster members from the counts analysis does not entirely eliminate the difference between the cluster samples. We also investigate possible occurrences of lensing between background SMGs and lower-z optical galaxies, though further observations are required to make any conclusive claims. Although the excess counts between the two cluster samples have not been unambiguously accounted for, these results warrant caution for interpreting submillimetre source counts in cluster fields and point source contamination for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys. [Abridged]