• Upper-division physics students spend much of their time solving problems. In addition to their basic skills and background, their epistemic framing can form an important part of their ability to learn physics from these problems. Encouraging students to move toward productive framing may help them solve problems. Thus, an instructor should understand the specifics of how student have framed a problem and understand how her interaction with the students will impact that framing. In this study we investigate epistemic framing of students in problem solving situations where math is applied to physics. To analyze the frames and changes in frames, we develop and use a two-axis framework involving conceptual and algorithmic physics and math. We examine student and instructor framing and the interactions of these frames over a range of problems in an upper-division electromagnetic fields course. Within interactions, students and instructors generally follow each others' leads in framing.
  • Many studies have investigated students' epistemological framing when solving physics problems. Framing supports students' problem solving as they decide what knowledge to employ and the necessary steps to solve the problem. Students may frame the same problem differently and take alternate paths to a correct solution. When students work in group settings, they share and discuss their framing to decide how to proceed in problem solving as a whole group. In this study, we investigate how groups of students negotiate their framing and frame shifts in group problem solving.