• Nodal-line semimetals are topological semimetals in which band touchings form nodal lines or rings. Around a loop that encloses a nodal line, an electron can accumulate a nontrivial $\pi$ Berry phase, so the phase shift in the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation may give a transport signature for the nodal-line semimetals. However, different experiments have reported contradictory phase shifts, in particular, in the WHM nodal-line semimetals (W=Zr/Hf, H=Si/Ge, M=S/Se/Te). For a generic model of nodal-line semimetals, we present a systematic calculation for the SdH oscillation of resistivity under a magnetic field normal to the nodal-line plane. From the analytical result of the resistivity, we extract general rules to determine the phase shifts for arbitrary cases and apply them to ZrSiS and Cu$_3$PdN systems. Depending on the magnetic field directions, carrier types, and cross sections of the Fermi surface, the phase shift shows rich results, quite different from those for normal electrons and Weyl fermions. Our results may help exploring transport signatures of topological nodal-line semimetals and can be generalized to other topological phases of matter.
  • Detecting the spectroscopic signatures of Dirac-like quasiparticles in emergent topological materials is crucial for searching their potential applications. Magnetometry is a powerful tool for fathoming electrons in solids, yet its ability for discerning Dirac-like quasiparticles has not been recognized. Adopting the probes of magnetic torque and parallel magnetization for the archetype Weyl semimetal TaAs in strong magnetic field, we observed a quasi-linear field dependent effective transverse magnetization and a strongly enhanced parallel magnetization when the system is in the quantum limit. Distinct from the saturating magnetic responses for massive carriers, the non-saturating signals of TaAs in strong field is consistent with our newly developed magnetization calculation for a Weyl fermion system in an arbitrary angle. Our results for the first time establish a thermodynamic criterion for detecting the unique magnetic response of 3D massless Weyl fermions in the quantum limit.
  • Identifying topological insulators and semimetals often focuses on their surface states, using spectroscopic methods such as the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. In contrast, studying the topological properties of topological insulators from their bulk-state transport is more accessible in most labs but seldom addressed. We show that, in the quantum limit of a topological insulator, the backscattering between the only two states on the Fermi surface of the lowest Landau band can be forbidden, at a critical magnetic field. The conductivity is determined solely by the backscattering between the two states, leading to a resistance dip that may serve as a signature for topological insulator phases. More importantly, this forbidden backscattering mechanism for the resistance dip is irrelevant to details of disorder scattering. Our theory can be applied to re-visit the experiments on Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Se, ZrTe$_5$, Ag$_2$Te families, and will be particularly useful for controversial small-gap materials at the boundary between topological insulator and normal insulator.
  • An intriguing phenomenon in topological semimetals and topological insulators is the negative magnetoresistance (MR) observed when a magnetic field is applied along the current direction. A prevailing understanding to the negative MR in topological semimetals is the chiral anomaly, which, however, is not well defined in topological insulators. We calculate the MR of a three-dimensional topological insulator, by using the semiclassical equations of motion, in which the Berry curvature explicitly induces an anomalous velocity and orbital moment. Our theoretical results are in quantitative agreement with the experiments. The negative MR is not sensitive to temperature and increases as the Fermi energy approaches the band edge. The orbital moment and g factors also play important roles in the negative MR. Our results give a reasonable explanation to the negative MR in 3D topological insulators and will be helpful in understanding the anomalous quantum transport in topological states of matter.
  • The quantum Hall effect is usually observed in 2D systems. We show that the Fermi arcs can give rise to a distinctive 3D quantum Hall effect in topological semimetals. Because of the topological constraint, the Fermi arc at a single surface has an open Fermi surface, which cannot host the quantum Hall effect. Via a "wormhole" tunneling assisted by the Weyl nodes, the Fermi arcs at opposite surfaces can form a complete Fermi loop and support the quantum Hall effect. The edge states of the Fermi arcs show a unique 3D distribution, giving an example of (d-2)-dimensional boundary states. This is distinctly different from the surface-state quantum Hall effect from a single surface of topological insulator. As the Fermi energy sweeps through the Weyl nodes, the sheet Hall conductivity evolves from the 1/B dependence to quantized plateaus at the Weyl nodes. This behavior can be realized by tuning gate voltages in a slab of topological semimetal, such as the TaAs family, Cd$_3$As$_2$, or Na$_3$Bi. This work will be instructive not only for searching transport signatures of the Fermi arcs but also for exploring novel electron gases in other topological phases of matter.
  • The concept of topological fermions, including Weyl and Dirac fermions, stems from the quantum Hall state induced by a magnetic field, but the definitions and classifications of topological fermions are formulated without using magnetic field. It is unclear whether and how the topological information of topological fermions can be probed once their eigen spectrum is completely rebuilt by a strong magnetic field. In this work, we provide an answer via mapping Landau levels (bands) of topological fermions in $d$ dimensions to the spectrum of a $(d-1)$-dimensional lattice model. The resultant "Landau lattice" may correspond to a topological insulator, and its topological property can be determined by real-space topological invariants. Accordingly, each zero-energy Landau level (band) inherits the topological stability from the corresponding topological boundary state of the Landau lattice. The theory is demonstrated in detail by transforming 2D Dirac fermions under magnetic fields to the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models in class AIII, and 3D Weyl fermions to the Chern insulators in class A.
  • Topological nodal line semimetals are characterized by the crossing of the conduction and valence bands along one or more closed loops in the Brillouin zone. Usually, these loops are either isolated or touch each other at some highly symmetric points. Here, we introduce a new kind of nodal line semimetal, that contains a pair of linked nodal loops. A concrete two-band model was constructed, which supports a pair of nodal lines with a double-helix structure, which can be further twisted into a Hopf link because of the periodicity of the Brillouin zone. The nodal lines are stabilized by the combined spatial inversion $\mathcal{P}$ and time reversal $\mathcal{T}$ symmetry; the individual $\mathcal{P}$ and $\mathcal{T}$ symmetries must be broken. The band exhibits nontrivial topology that each nodal loop carries a $\pi$ Berry flux. Surface flat bands emerge at the open boundary and are exactly encircled by the projection of the nodal lines on the surface Brillouin zone. The experimental implementation of our model using cold atoms in optical lattices is discussed.
  • Weyl nodes are topological objects in three-dimensional metals. Their topological property can be revealed by studying the high-field transport properties of a Weyl semimetal. While the energy of the lowest Landau band (LLB) of a conventional Fermi pocket always increases with magnetic field due to the zero point energy, the LLB of Weyl cones remains at zero energy unless a strong magnetic field couples the Weyl fermions of opposite chirality. In the Weyl semimetal TaP, we achieve such a magnetic coupling between the electron-like Fermi pockets arising from the W1 Weyl fermions. As a result, their LLBs move above chemical potential, leading to a sharp sign reversal in the Hall resistivity at a specific magnetic field corresponding to the W1 Weyl node separation. By contrast, despite having almost identical carrier density, the annihilation is unobserved for the hole-like pockets because the W2 Weyl nodes are much further separated. These key findings, corroborated by other systematic analyses, reveal the nontrivial topology of Weyl fermions in high-field measurements.
  • Topological semimetals are three-dimensional topological states of matter, in which the conduction and valence bands touch at a finite number of points, i.e., the Weyl nodes. Topological semimetals host paired monopoles and antimonopoles of Berry curvature at the Weyl nodes and topologically protected Fermi arcs at certain surfaces. We review our recent works on quantum transport in topological semimetals, according to the strength of the magnetic field. At weak magnetic fields, there are competitions between the positive magnetoresistivity induced by the weak anti-localization effect and negative magnetoresistivity related to the nontrivial Berry curvature. We propose a fitting formula for the magnetoconductivity of the weak anti-localization. We expect that the weak localization may by induced by inter- alley effects and interaction effect, and occur in double-Weyl semimetals. For the negative magnetoresistance induced by the nontrivial Berry curvature in topological semimetals, we show the dependence of the negative magnetoresistance on the carrier density. At strong magnetic fields, specifically, in the quantum limit, the magnetoconduction depends on the type and range of the scattering potential of disorder. The high-field positive magnetoconductivity may not be a compelling signature of the chiral anomaly. For long-range Gaussian scattering potential and half filling, the magnetoconductivity can be linear in the quantum limit. A minimal conductivity is found at the Weyl nodes although the density of states vanishes there.
  • Berry phase physics is closely related to a number of topological states of matter. Recently discovered topological semimetals are believed to host a nontrivial $\pi$ Berry phase to induce a phase shift of $\pm 1/8$ in the quantum oscillation ($+$ for hole and $-$ for electron carriers). We theoretically study the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation of Weyl and Dirac semimetals, taking into account their topological nature and inter-Landau band scattering. For a Weyl semimetal with broken time-reversal symmetry, the phase shift is found to change nonmonotonically and go beyond known values of $\pm 1/8$ and $\pm 5/8$. For a Dirac semimetal or paramagnetic Weyl semimetal, time-reversal symmetry leads to a discrete phase shift of $\pm 1/8$ or $\pm 5/8$, as a function of the Fermi energy. Different from the previous works, we find that the topological band inversion can lead to beating patterns in the absence of Zeeman splitting. We also find the resistivity peaks should be assigned integers in the Landau index plot. Our findings may account for recent experiments in Cd$_2$As$_3$ and should be helpful for exploring the Berry phase in various 3D systems.
  • Majorana bound states (MBSs) nested in a topological nanowire are predicted to manifest nonlocal correlations in the presence of a finite energy splitting between the MBSs. However, the signal of the nonlocal correlations has not yet been detected in experiments. A possible reason is that the energy splitting is too weak and seriously affected by many system parameters. Here we investigate the charging energy induced nonlocal correlations in a hybrid device of MBSs and quantum dots. The nanowire that hosts the MBSs is assumed in proximity to a mesoscopic superconducting island with a finite charging energy. Each end of the nanowire is coupled to one lead via a quantum dot with resonant levels. With a floating superconducting island, the devices shows a negative differential conductance and giant super-Poissonian shot noise, due to the interplay between the nonlocality of the MBSs and dynamical Coulomb blockade effect. When the island is strongly coupled to a bulk superconductor, the current cross correlations at small lead chemical potentials are negative by tuning the dot energy levels. In contrast, the cross correlation is always positive in a non-Majorana setup. This difference may provide a signature for the existence of the MBSs.
  • Searching for the signature of the violation of chiral charge conservation in solids has inspired a growing passion on the magneto-transport in topological semimetals. One of the open questions is how the conductivity depends on magnetic fields in a semimetal phase when the Fermi energy crosses the Weyl nodes. Here, we study both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoconductivity of a topological Weyl semimetal near the Weyl nodes with the help of a two-node model that includes all the topological semimetal properties. In the semimetal phase, the Fermi energy crosses only the 0th Landau bands in magnetic fields. For a finite potential range of impurities, it is found that both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoconductivity are positive and linear at the Weyl nodes, leading to an anisotropic and negative magnetoresistivity. The longitudinal magnetoconductivity depends on the potential range of impurities. The longitudinal conductivity remains finite at zero field, even though the density of states vanishes at the Weyl nodes. This work establishes a relation between the linear magnetoconductivity and the intrinsic topological Weyl semimetal phase.
  • Many exotic physics anticipated in topological insulators require a gap to be opened for their topologica surface states by breaking time reversal symmetry. The gap opening has been achieved by doping magnetic impurities, which however inevitably create extra carriers and disorder that undermine the electronic transport. In contrast, the proximity to a ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic insulator may improve the device quality, thus promises a better way to open the gap while minimizing the side-effects. Here, we grow thin single-crystal Sb1.9Bi0.1Te3 micro flakes on insulating ferrimagnet BaFe12O19 by using the van der Waals epitaxy technique. The micro flakes show a negative magnetoresistance in weak perpendicular fields below 50 K, which can be quenched by increasing temperature. The signature implies the weak localization effect as its origin, which is absent in intrinsic topological insulators, unless a surface state gap is opened. The surface state gap is estimated to be 10 meV by using the theory of the gap-induced weak localization effect. These results indicate that the magnetic proximity effect may open the gap for the topological surface attached to BaM insulating ferrimagnet. This heterostructure may pave the way for the realization of new physical effects as well as the potential applications of spintronics devices.
  • Topological Weyl semimetals can host Weyl nodes with monopole charges in momentum space. How to detect the signature of the monopole charges in quantum transport remains a challenging topic. Here, we reveal the connection between the parity of monopole charge in topological semimetals and the quantum interference corrections to the conductivity. We show that the parity of monopole charge determines the sign of the quantum interference correction, with odd and even parity yielding the weak anti-localization and weak localization effects, respectively. This is attributed to the Berry phase difference between time-reversed trajectories circulating the Fermi sphere that encloses the monopole charges. From standard Feynman diagram calculations, we further show that the weak-field magnetoconductivity at low temperatures is proportional to $+\sqrt{B}$ in double-Weyl semimetals and $-\sqrt{B}$ in Weyl semimetals, respectively, which could be verified experimentally.
  • Weyl semimetals provide the realization of Weyl fermions in solid-state physics. Among all the physical phenomena that are enabled by Weyl semimetals, the chiral anomaly is the most unusual one. Here, we report signatures of the chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport measurements on the first Weyl semimetal TaAs. We show negative magnetoresistance under parallel electric and magnetic fields, that is, unlike most metals whose resistivity increases under an external magnetic field, we observe that our high mobility TaAs samples become more conductive as a magnetic field is applied along the direction of the current for certain ranges of the field strength. We present systematically detailed data and careful analyses, which allow us to exclude other possible origins of the observed negative magnetoresistance. Our transport data, corroborated by photoemission measurements, first-principles calculations and theoretical analyses, collectively demonstrate signatures of the Weyl fermion chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport of TaAs.
  • A large negative magnetoresistance is anticipated in topological semimetals in the parallel magnetic and electric field configuration as a consequence of the nontrivial topological properties. The negative magnetoresistance is believed to demonstrate the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that Cd3As2, a Dirac topological semimetal, has the record-high mobility and exhibits positive linear magnetoresistance in the orthogonal magnetic and electric field configuration. However, the negative magnetoresistance in the parallel magnetic and electric field configuration remains unveiled. Here, we report the observation of the negative magnetoresistance in Cd3As2 microribbons in the parallel magnetic and electric field configuration as large as 66% at 50 K and even visible at room temperatures. The observed negative magnetoresistance is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical field, robust against temperature, and dependent on the carrier density. We have found that carrier densities of our Cd3As2 samples obey an Arrhenius's law, decreasing from 3.0x10^17 cm^-3 at 300 K to 2.2x10^16 cm^-3 below 50 K. The low carrier densities result in the large values of the negative magnetoresistance. We therefore attribute the observed negative magnetoresistance to the chiral anomaly. Furthermore, in the perpendicular magnetic and electric field configuration a positive non-saturating linear magnetoresistance up to 1670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. This work demonstrates potential applications of topological semimetals in magnetic devices.
  • Weyl semimetals are three-dimensional topological states of matter, in a sense that they host paired monopoles and antimonopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, leading to the chiral anomaly. The chiral anomaly has long been believed to give a positive magnetoconductivity or negative magnetoresistivity in strong and parallel fields. However, several recent experiments on both Weyl and Dirac topological semimetals show a negative magnetoconductivity in high fields. Here, we study the magnetoconductivity of Weyl and Dirac semimetals in the presence of short-range scattering potentials. In a strong magnetic field applied along the direction that connects two Weyl nodes, we find that the conductivity along the field direction is determined by the Fermi velocity, instead of by the Landau degeneracy. We identify three scenarios in which the high-field magnetoconductivity is negative. Our findings show that the high-field positive magnetoconductivity may not be a compelling signature of the chiral anomaly and will be helpful for interpreting the inconsistency in the recent experiments and earlier theories.
  • Using the Feynman diagram techniques, we derive the finite-temperature conductivity and magnetoconductivity formulas from the quantum interference and electron-electron interaction, for a three-dimensional disordered Weyl semimetal. For a single valley of Weyl fermions, we find that the magnetoconductivity is negative and proportional to the square root of magnetic field at low temperatures, as a result of the weak antilocalization. By including the contributions from the weak antilocalization, Berry curvature correction, and Lorentz force, we compare the calculated magnetoconductivity with a recent experiment. The weak antilocalization always dominates the magnetoconductivity near zero field, thus gives one of the transport signatures for Weyl semimetals. In the presence of strong intervalley scattering and correlations, we expect a crossover from the weak antilocalization to weak localization. In addition, we find that the interplay of electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering always dominates the conductivity at low temperatures and leads to a tendency to localization. Finally, we present a systematic comparison of the transport properties of single-valley Weyl fermions, 2D massless Dirac fermions, and 3D conventional electrons.
  • The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. Here we study the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect resulting from structure inversion asymmetry. The phase diagrams of the quantum Hall states are presented as functions of magnetic field, gate voltage and chemical potential. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.
  • We study the transport properties of a quantum dot-Majorana hybrid system, in which each of paired Majorana bound states is connected to one quantum dot. With the help of non-equilibrium Green's function method, we obtain an exact solution of the Green's functions and calculate the currents through the quantum dots and nonlocal noise cross correlation between the currents. As a function of dot energy levels $\epsilon_{1}$ and $\epsilon_{2}$, we find that for the symmetric level configuration $\epsilon_{1}=\epsilon_{2}$, the noise cross correlation is negative in the low lead voltage regime, while it becomes positive with the increase of the lead voltages. Due to the particle-hole symmetry, the cross correlation is always positive in the anti-symmetric case $\epsilon_{1}=-\epsilon_{2}$. In contrast, the cross correlation of non-Majorana setups is always positive. For comparison, we also perform the diagonalized master equation calculation to check its applicability. It is found that the diagonalized master equations work well in most regimes of system parameters. Nevertheless, it shows an obvious deviation from the exact solution by the non-equilibrium Green's function method when all eigenenergies of the dot-Majorana hybrid system and simultaneously the energy intervals are comparable to the dot-lead coupling strength.
  • Recently, a logarithmic decrease of conductivity has been observed in topological insulators at low temperatures, implying a tendency of localization of surface electrons. Here, we report quantum transport experiments on the topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films with arrayed antidot nanostructures. With increasing density of the antidots, a systematic decrease is observed in the slope of the logarithmic temperature-dependent conductivity curves, indicating the electron-electron interaction can be tuned by the antidots. Meanwhile, the weak anti-localization effect revealed in magnetoconductivity exhibits an enhanced dominance of electron-electron interaction among decoherence mechanisms. The observation can be understood from an antidot-induced reduction of the effective dielectric constant, which controls the interactions between the surface electrons. Our results clarify the indispensable role of the electron-electron interaction in the localization of surface electrons and indicate the localization of surface electrons in an interacting topological insulator.
  • Weak localization and weak anti-localization are quantum interference effects in quantum transport in a disordered electron system. Weak anti-localization enhances the conductivity and weak localization suppresses the conductivity with decreasing temperature at very low temperatures. A magnetic field can destroy the quantum interference effect, giving rise to a cusp-like positive and negative magnetoconductivity as the signatures of weak localization and weak anti-localization, respectively. These effects have been widely observed in topological insulators. In this article, we review recent progresses in both theory and experiment of weak (anti-)localization in topological insulators, where the quasiparticles are described as Dirac fermions. We predicted a crossover from weak anti-localization to weak localization if the massless Dirac fermions (such as the surface states of topological insulator) acquire a Dirac mass, which was confirmed experimentally. The bulk states in a topological insulator thin film can exhibit the weak localization effect, quite different from other system with strong spin-orbit interaction. We compare the localization behaviors of Dirac fermions with conventional electron systems in the presence of disorders of different symmetries. Finally, we show that both the interaction and quantum interference are required to account for the experimentally observed temperature and magnetic field dependence of the conductivity at low temperatures.
  • The electronic transport experiments on topological insulators exhibit a dilemma. A negative cusp in magnetoconductivity is widely believed as a quantum transport signature of the topological surface states, which are immune from localization and exhibit the weak antilocalization. However, the measured conductivity drops logarithmically when lowering temperature, showing a typical feature of the weak localization as in ordinary disordered metals. Here, we present a conductivity formula for massless and massive Dirac fermions as a function of magnetic field and temperature, by taking into account the electron-electron interaction and quantum interference simultaneously. The formula reconciles the dilemma by explicitly clarifying that the temperature dependence of the conductivity is dominated by the interaction while the magnetoconductivity is mainly contributed by the quantum interference. The theory paves the road to quantitatively study the transport in topological insulators and other two-dimensional Dirac-like systems, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and silicene.
  • The experimental observation of the long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was recently reported in magnetically doped topological insulator thin films [Chang et al., Science 340, 167 (2013)]. An intriguing observation is a rapid decrease from the quantized plateau in the Hall conductance, accompanied by a peak in the longitudinal conductance as a function of the gate voltage. Here, we present a quantum transport theory with an effective model for magnetic topological insulator thin films. The good agreement between theory and experiment reveals that the measured transport originates from a topologically nontrivial conduction band which, near its band edge, has concentrated Berry curvature and a local maximum in group velocity. The indispensable roles of the broken structure inversion and particle-hole symmetries are also revealed. The results are instructive for future experiments and transport studies based on first-principles calculations.
  • We study both the intrinsic and extrinsic spin Hall effect in spin-valley coupled monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. We find that whereas the skew-scattering contribution is suppressed by the large band gap, the side-jump contribution is comparable to the intrinsic one with opposite sign in the presence of scalar and magnetic scattering. Intervalley scattering tends to suppress the side-jump contribution due to the loss of coherence. By tuning the ratio of intra- to intervalley scattering, the spin Hall conductivity shows a sign change in hole-doped samples. Multiband effect in other doping regime is considered, and it is found that the sign change exists in the heavily hole-doped regime, but not in the electron-doped regime.