• The solar corona is frequently disrupted by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), whose core structure is believed to be a flux rope made of helical magnetic field. This has become a "standard" picture although it remains elusive how the flux rope forms and evolves toward eruption. While 1/3 of the ejecta passing through spacecrafts demonstrate a flux-rope structure, the rest have complex magnetic fields. Are they originating from a coherent flux rope, too? Here we investigate the source region of a complex ejecta, focusing on a flare precursor with definitive signatures of magnetic reconnection, i.e., nonthermal electrons, flaring plasma, and bi-directional outflowing blobs. Aided by nonlinear force-free field modeling, we conclude that the reconnection occurs within a system of multiple braided flux ropes with different degree of coherency. The observation signifies the importance of internal structure and dynamics in understanding CMEs and in predicting their impacts on Earth.
  • Solar energetic particles (SEPs), including protons and heavy ions, are believed to be accelerated either by CME shock or by magnetic reconnection. The latter also produces solar flares, in which the white light flares (WLFs) are among the most energetic ones. Magnetic reconnections occur in the corona and the accelerated particles propagate both downward and upward along the magnetic loops. The former is the source of flare emission and the latter is thought to be SEPs. Therefore, a comparison between flare emission and SEP events provides valuable constraint in determining the acceleration site of SEPs. We collect 43 SEP events, observed from 2010 to 2017, and investigate their correlation with WL emission and SXR flus, observed by SDO/HMI and GOES, respectively. Our preliminary results show: 1) Among 47 SEP events, 39 of which do not have detectable flare emissions in white light and SXR. 2) Most strong WLFs are not associated with SEPs. 3) No clear correlation is found between the proton flux and the equivalent area, a quantity that measures the magnitude of WLF emission. A straightforward speculation is that the acceleration process could be different for SEPs and the energetic electrons powering WLFs in the events analyzed.
  • The evolution of photospheric flow and magnetic fields before and after flares can provide important information regarding the flare triggering and back reaction processes. However, such studies on the flow field are rare due to the paucity of high-resolution observations covering the entire flaring period. Here we study the structural evolution of penumbra and shear flows associated with the 2015 June 22 M6.5 flare in NOAA AR 12371, using high-resolution imaging observation in the TiO band taken by the 1.6~m Goode Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, with the aid of the differential affine velocity estimator method for flow tracking. The accompanied photospheric vector magnetic field changes are also analyzed using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. As a result, we found, for a penumbral segment in the negative field adjacent to the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), an enhancement of penumbral flows (up to an unusually high value of \sm2~\kms) and extension of penumbral fibrils after the first peak of the flare hard X-ray (HXR) emission. We also found an area at the PIL, which is co-spatial with a precursor brightening kernel, exhibits a gradual increase of shear flow velocity (up to \sm0.9~\kms) after the flare. The enhancing penumbral and shear flow regions are also accompanied by an increase of horizontal field and decrease of magnetic inclination angle(measured from the solar surface). These results are discussed in the context of the theory of back reaction of coronal restructuring on the photosphere as a result of flare energy release.
  • Solar Active Region (AR) 12673 is the most flare productive AR in the solar cycle 24. It produced four X-class flares including the X9.3 flare on 06 September 2017 and the X8.2 limb event on 10 September. Sun and Norton (2017) reported that this region had an unusual high rate of flux emergence, while Huang et al. (2018) reported that the X9.3 flare had extremely strong white-light flare emissions. Yang at al. (2017) described the detailed morphological evolution of this AR. In this report, we focus on usual behaviors of the light bridge (LB) dividing the delta configuration of this AR, namely the strong magnetic fields (above 5500 G) in the LB and apparent photospheric twist as shown in observations with a 0.1 arcsec spatial resolution obtained by the 1.6m telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory.
  • As one of the most violent eruptions on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection. The fundamental physics involving the release, transfer and deposition of energy have been studied extensively. Taking advantage of the unprecedented resolution provided by the 1.6-m Goode Solar Telescope, here we show a sudden rotation of vector magnetic fields, about 12$^{\circ}$-20$^{\circ}$ counterclockwise, associated with a flare. Unlike the permanent changes reported previously, the azimuth-angle change is transient and co-spatial/temporal with H$\alpha$ emission. The measured azimuth angle becomes closer to that in potential fields suggesting untwist of flare loops. The magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1.56~$\mu$m, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. We believe that these transient changes are real and discuss the possible explanations in which the high energy electron beams or $Alfv\acute{e}n$ waves play a crucial role.
  • We analyze the high-resolution observations from the 1.6m telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory that cover an active region filament. Counter-streaming motions are clearly observed in the filament. The northern end of the counter-streaming motions extends to a light bridge, forming a spectacular circulation pattern around a sunspot, with clockwise motion in the blue wing and counterclockwise motion in the red wing as observed in Halpha off-bands. The apparent speed of the flow is around 10 to 60 km/s in the filament, decreasing to 5 to 20 km/s in the light bridge. The most intriguing results are the magnetic structure and the counter-streaming motions in the light bridge. Similar to those in the filament, magnetic fields show a dominant transverse component in the light bridge. However, the filament is located between opposite magnetic polarities, while the light bridge is between strong fields of the same polarity. We analyze the power of oscillations with the image sequences of constructed Dopplergrams, and find that the filament's counter-streaming motion is due to physical mass motion along fibrils, while the light bridge's counter-streaming motion is due to oscillation in the direction along the line-of-sight. The oscillation power peaks around 4 minutes. However, the section of the light bridge next to the filament also contains a component of the extension of the filament in combination with the oscillation, indicating that some strands of the filament are extended to and rooted in that part of the light bridge.
  • The well-established notion of a "common population" of the accelerated electrons simultaneously producing the hard X-ray (HXR) and the microwave (MW) emission during the flare impulsive phase has been challenged by some studies reporting the discrepancies between the HXR-inferred and the MW-inferred electron energy spectra. The traditional methods of their spectral inversion have some problems that can be mainly attributed to the unrealistic and the oversimplified treatment of the flare emission. To properly address this problem, we use a Non-linear Force Free Field (NLFFF) model extrapolated from an observed photospheric magnetogram as input to the three-dimensional, multi-wavelength modeling platform GX Simulator, and create a unified electron population model that can simultaneously reproduce the observed HXR and MW observations. We model the end of the impulsive phase of the 2015-06-22 M6.5 flare, and constrain the modeled electron spatial and energy parameters using observations made by the highest-resolving instruments currently available in two wavelengths, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) for HXR and the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) for MW. Our results suggest that the HXR-emitting electron population model fits the standard flare model with a broken power-law spectrum (E_break ~ 200 keV) that simultaneously produces the HXR footpoint emission and the MW high frequency emission. The model also includes an "HXR invisible" population of nonthermal electrons that are trapped in a large volume of magnetic field above the HXR-emitting loops, which is observable by its gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation emitting mainly in MW low frequency range.
  • Context. Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) have been frequently observed during the gradual phase of solar flares near the limb. In coronal emission lines sensitive to flaring plasmas, they appear as tadpole-like dark voids against the diffuse fan-shaped "haze" above, flowing toward the well-defined flare arcade. Aims. We aim to investigate the evolution of SADs' thermal properties, and to shed light on the formation mechanism and physical processes of SADs. Methods. We carefully studied several selected SADs from two flare events and calculated their differential emission measures (DEMs) as well as DEM-weighted temperatures using data obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Results. Our analysis shows that SADs are associated with a substantial decrease in DEM above 4 MK, which is 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the surrounding haze as well as the region before or after the passage of SADs, but comparable to the quiet corona. There is no evidence for the presence of the SAD-associated hot plasma (> 20 MK) in the AIA data, and this decrease in DEM does not cause any significant change in the DEM distribution as well as the DEM-weighted temperature, which supports this idea that SADs are density depletion. This depression in DEM rapidly recovers in the wake of the SADs studied, generally within a few minutes, suggesting that they are discrete features. In addition, we found that SADs in one event are spatio-temporally associated with the successive formation of post-flare loops along the flare arcade.
  • Adverse space weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December, and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hours, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF is used to make multi-class predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.
  • We report the intriguing large-scale dynamic phenomena associated with the M6.5 flare~(SOL2015-06-22T18:23) in NOAA active region 12371, observed by RHESSI, Fermi, and the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The most interesting feature of this event is a third ribbon (R3) arising in the decay phase, propagating along a dimming channel (seen in EUV passbands) towards a neighboring sunspot. The propagation of R3 occurs in the presence of hard X-ray footpoint emission, and is broadly visible at temperatures from 0.6~MK to over 10~MK through the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis. The coronal loops then undergo an apparent slipping motion following the same path of R3, after a $\sim$ 80~min delay. To understand the underlying physics, we investigate the magnetic configuration and the thermal structure of the flaring region. Our results are in favor of a slipping-type reconnection followed by the thermodynamic evolution of coronal loops. In comparison with those previously reported slipping reconnection events, this one proceeds across a particularly long distance ($\sim$60 Mm) over a long period of time ($\sim$50 min), and shows two clearly distinguished phases: the propagation of the footpoint brightening driven by nonthermal particle injection and the apparent slippage of loops governed by plasma heating and subsequent cooling.
  • Studying the dynamics of filaments at pre-eruption phase can shed light on the precursor of eruptive events. Such studies in high-resolution (in the order of 0.1") are highly desirable yet very rare so far. In this work, we present a detailed observation of a pre-eruption evolution of a filament obtained by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). One end of the filament is anchored at the sunspot in NOAA active region (AR) 11515, which is well observed by NST H$\alpha$ off-bands four hours before till one hour after the filament eruption. A M1.6 flare is associated with the eruption. We observed persistent downflowing materials along the H$\alpha$ multi-threaded component of the loop towards the AR end during the pre-eruption phase. We traced the trajectories of plasma blobs along the H$\alpha$ threads and obtained the plane-of-sky velocity of 45 km s$^{-1}$ on average. We further estimated the real velocities of the downflows and the altitude of the filament by matching the observed H$\alpha$ threads with magnetic field lines extrapolated from a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) model. Observation of chromospheric brightenings (BZs) at the footpoints of the falling plasma blobs is also presented in the paper. The lower limit of the kinetic energy per second of the downflows through the BZs is found to be $\sim$ 10$^{21}$ erg. Larger FOV observations from BBSO full disk H$\alpha$ images show that the AR end of the filament started ascending four hours before the flare. We attribute the observed downflows at the AR end of the filament to the draining effect of the filament rising prior to its eruption. During the slow-rise phase, the downflows continuously drained away $\sim$ 10$^{15}$g mass from the filament over a few hours, which is believed to be essential for the instability at last, and could be an important precursor of eruptive events.
  • Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to 50 deg per hr) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.
  • Solar flares are generally believed to be powered by free magnetic energy stored in the corona, but the build up of coronal energy alone may be insufficient for the imminent flare occurrence. The flare onset mechanism is a critical but less understood problem, insights into which could be gained from small-scale energy releases known as precursors, which are observed as small pre-flare brightenings in various wavelengths, and also from certain small-scale magnetic configurations such as the opposite polarity fluxes, where magnetic orientation of small bipoles is opposite to that of the ambient main polarities. However, high-resolution observations of flare precursors together with the associated photospheric magnetic field dynamics are lacking. Here we study precursors of a flare using unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, complemented by novel microwave data. Two episodes of precursor brightenings are initiated at a small-scale magnetic channel (a form of opposite polarity fluxes) with multiple polarity inversions and enhanced magnetic fluxes and currents, lying near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops. The low-atmospheric origin of these precursor emissions is corroborated by microwave spectra. We propose that the emerging magnetic channel field interacts with the sheared arcades to cause precursor brightenings at the main flare core region. These high-resolution results provide evidence of low-atmospheric small-scale energy release and possible relationship to the onset of the main flare.
  • Using high-resolution observations from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), we report direct evidence of merging/reconnection of cool H$\alpha$ loops in the chromosphere during two homologous flares (B- and C-class) caused by a shear motion at the footpoint of two loops. The reconnection between these loops caused the formation of an unstable flux rope which showed counterclockwise rotation. The flux rope could not reach the height of torus instability and failed to form a coronal mass ejection. The HMI magnetograms revealed rotation of the negative/positive (N1/P2) polarity sunspots in the opposite directions, which increased the right and left-handed twist in the magnetic structures rooted at N1/P2. Rapid photospheric flux cancellation (duration$\sim$20-30 min, rate$\approx$3.44$\times$10$^{20}$ Mx h$^{-1}$) was observed during and even after the first B6.0 flare and continued until the end of the second C2.3 flare. The RHESSI X-ray sources were located at the site of the loop's coalescence. To the best of our knowledge, such a clear interaction of chromospheric loops along with rapid flux cancellation has not been reported before. These high-resolution observations suggest the formation of a small flux rope by a series of magnetic reconnection within chromospheric loops associated with very rapid flux cancellation.
  • White-light (WL) flares have been observed and studied more than a century since the first discovery. However, some fundamental physics behind the brilliant emission remains highly controversial. One of the important facts in addressing the flare energetics is the spatialtemporal correlation between the white-light emission and the hard X-ray radiation, presumably suggesting that the energetic electrons are the energy sources. In this study, we present a statistical analysis of 25 strong flares (?greater than or equal to M5) observed simultaneously by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Among these events, WL emission was detected by SDO/HMI in 13 flares, associated with HXR emission. To quantitatively describe the strength of WL emission, equivalent area (EA) is defined as the integrated contrast enhancement over the entire flaring area. Our results show that the equivalent area is inversely proportional to the HXR power index, indicating that stronger WL emission tends to be associated with larger population of high energy electrons. However, no obvious correlation is found between WL emission and flux of non-thermal electrons at 50 keV. For the other group of 13 flares without detectable WL emission, the HXR spectra are softer (larger power index) than those flares with WL emission, especially for the X-class flares in this group.
  • The rotation of sunspots of 2 yr in two different solar cycles is studied with the data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the \it Solar Dynamics Observatory \rm and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the \it Solar and Heliospheric Observataory.\rm We choose the $\alpha$ sunspot groups and the relatively large and stable sunspots of complex active regions in our sample. In the year of 2003, the $\alpha$ sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots tend to rotate counterclockwise and have positive magnetic polarity in the northern hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere, the magnetic polarity and rotational tendency of the $\alpha$ sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots are opposite to the northern hemisphere. The average rotational speed of these sunspots in 2003 is about $0^{\circ}.65 \rm \ hr^{-1}$. From 2014 January to 2015 February, the $\alpha$ sunspot groups and the preceding sunspots tend to rotate clockwise and have negative magnetic polarity in the northern hemisphere. The patterns of rotation and magnetic polarity of the southern hemisphere are also opposite to those of the northern hemisphere. The average rotational speed of these sunspots in 2014/2015 is about $1^{\circ}.49 \rm \ hr^{-1}$. The rotation of the relatively large and stable preceding sunspots and that of the $\alpha$ sunspot groups located in the same hemisphere have opposite rotational direction in 2003 and 2014/2015.
  • Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. (2014b) revealed numerous short-lived subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether these subarcsecond TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a multi-wavelength study of the TR penumbral BDs using a coordinated observation of a near disk-center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrow-band H-alpha imaging spectroscopy and broad-band TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral BDs are identified from a 37-minute time series of IRIS 1400 A slitjaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the BDs show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral BDs by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The BDs may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.
  • We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using a data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution,which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully "reproduced" the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption-the consequent of the reconnection is the shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found much weaker magnetic implosion effect comparing to many other X-class flares
  • Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.
  • It has been found that photospheric magnetic fields can change in accordance with the three-dimensional magnetic field restructuring following solar eruptions. Previous studies mainly use vector magnetic field data taken for events near the disk center. In this paper, we analyze the magnetic field evolution associated with the 2012 October 23 X1.8 flare in NOAA AR 11598 that is close to the solar limb, using both the 45 s cadence line-of-sight and 12 minute cadence vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board Solar Dynamic Observatory. This flare is classified as a circular-ribbon flare with spine-fan type magnetic topology containing a null point. In the line-of-sight magnetograms, there are two apparent polarity inversion lines (PIL). The PIL closer to the limb is affected more by the projection effect. Between these two PILs there lie positive polarity magnetic fields, which are surrounded by negative polarity fields outside the PILs. We find that after the flare, both the apparent limb-ward and disk-ward negative fluxes decrease, while the positive flux in-between increases. We also find that the horizontal magnetic fields have a significant increase along the disk-ward PIL, while in surrounding area, they decrease. Synthesizing the observed field changes, we conclude that the magnetic fields collapse toward the surface above the disk-ward PIL as depicted in the coronal implosion scenario, while the peripheral field turns to a more vertical configuration after the flare. We also suggest that this event is an asymmetric circular-ribbon flare: a flux rope is likely present above the disk-ward PIL. Its eruption causes the instability of the entire fan-spine structure and the implosion near that PIL.
  • Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles which have adverse effects in the near Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6~m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, here we show a striking "negative" flare with a narrow, but unambiguous "dark" moving front observed in He I 10830 \AA, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in H-alpha and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 \AA\ can be produced under special circumstances, by nonthermal-electron collisions, or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomical objects.
  • We investigate the evolution of NOAA Active Region 11817 during 2013 August 10--12, when it developed a complex field configuration and produced four confined, followed by two eruptive, flares. These C-and-above flares are all associated with a magnetic flux rope (MFR) located along the major polarity inversion line, where shearing and converging photospheric flows are present. Aided by the nonlinear force-free field modeling, we identify the MFR through mapping magnetic connectivities and computing the twist number $\mathcal{T}_w$ for each individual field line. The MFR is moderately twisted ($|\mathcal{T}_w| < 2$) and has a well-defined boundary of high squashing factor $Q$. We found that the field line with the extremum $|\mathcal{T}_w|$ is a reliable proxy of the rope axis, and that the MFR's peak $|\mathcal{T}_w|$ temporarily increases within half an hour before each flare while it decreases after the flare peak for both confined and eruptive flares. This pre-flare increase in $|\mathcal{T}_w|$ has little effect on the active region's free magnetic energy or any other parameters derived for the whole region, due to its moderate amount and the MFR's relatively small volume, while its decrease after flares is clearly associated with the stepwise decrease in free magnetic energy due to the flare. We suggest that $\mathcal{T}_w$ may serve as a useful parameter in forewarning the onset of eruption, and therefore, the consequent space weather effects. The helical kink instability is identified as the prime candidate onset mechanism for the considered flares.
  • The dynamic properties of flare ribbons and the often associated filament eruptions can provide crucial information on the flaring coronal magnetic field. This Letter analyzes the GOES-class X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48), in which we found an asymmetric eruption of a sigmoidal filament and an ensuing circular flare ribbon. Initially both EUV images and a preflare nonlinear force-free field model show that the filament is embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine-like structure. In the first phase, which is defined by a weak but still increasing X-ray emission, the western portion of the sigmoidal filament arches upward and then remains quasi-static for about five minutes. The western fan-like and the outer spine-like fields display an ascending motion, and several associated ribbons begin to brighten. Also found is a bright EUV flow that streams down along the eastern fan-like field. In the second phase that includes the main peak of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, the filament erupts, leaving behind two major HXR sources formed around its central dip portion and a circular ribbon brightened sequentially. The expanding western fan-like field interacts intensively with the outer spine-like field, as clearly seen in running difference EUV images. We discuss these observations in favor of a scenario where the asymmetric eruption of the sigmoidal filament is initiated due to an MHD instability and further facilitated by reconnection at a quasi-null in corona; the latter is in turn enhanced by the filament eruption and subsequently produces the circular flare ribbon.
  • In this paper, we present a study on persistent and gradual penumbral decay and correlated decline of the photospheric transverse field component during 10-20 hours before a major flare (X1.8) eruption on 2011 September 7. This long-term pre-eruption behavior is corroborated with the well-imaged pre-flare filament rising, the consistent expansion of coronal arcades overlying the filament, as well as the NLFFF modelling results in the literature. We suggest that both the long-term pre-flare penumbral decay and the transverse field decline are the photospheric manifestation of the gradual rise of the coronal filament-flux rope system. We also suggest that a C3 flare and subsequent reconnection process preceding the X1.8 flare play an important role in triggering the later major eruption.
  • In this paper, we present observations and analysis of an interesting sigmoid formation, eruption and the associated flare that occurred on 2014 April 18 using multi-wavelength data sets. We discuss the possible role of the sigmoid eruption in triggering the flare, which consists of two different set of ribbons: parallel ribbons as well as a large-scale quasi-circular ribbon. Several observational evidence and nonlinear force-free field extrapolation results show the existence of a large-scale fan-spine type magnetic configuration with a sigmoid lying under a section of the fan dome. The event can be explained with the following two phases. During the pre-flare phase, we observed the formation and appearance of sigmoid via tether-cutting reconnection between the two sets of sheared fields under the fan dome. The second, main flare phase, features the eruption of the sigmoid, the subsequent flare with parallel ribbons, and a quasi-circular ribbon. We propose the following multi-stage successive reconnections scenario for the main flare. First, tether-cutting reconnection is responsible for the formation and the eruption of the sigmoid structure. Second, the reconnection occurred in the wake of the erupting sigmoid produces the parallel flare ribbons on the both sides of the circular polarity inversion line. Third, the null-type reconnection higher in the corona, possibly triggered by the erupting sigmoid, leads to the formation of a large quasi-circular ribbon. For the first time we suggest a mechanism for this type of flare consisting of a double set of ribbons triggered by an erupting sigmoid in a large scale fan-spine type magnetic configuration.